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2011 NFL Draft - The CFN Top 250 (2nd Round)
Nebada OLB/DE Dontay Moch
Nebada OLB/DE Dontay Moch
CollegeFootballNews.com
Posted Mar 3, 2011


After the Combine, CFN's Top 250 Draft Prospects for 2011. Here are the players with second round talent.


2011 NFL Post-Combine

2nd Round Talents


2011 NFL Post-Combine Draft Rankings
- Top 32 Talents | 2nd Rounders | 3rd Rounders | 4th Rounders
- 5th Rounders | 6th Rounders | 7th Rounders & Top Free Agents  

2011 NFL Combine Position Analysis
- QBs | RBs | WRs | TEs | Cs | OTs | OGs 
- DEs | DTs | ILBs | OLBs | Ss | CBs

2011 NFL Combine Results

- QBs | RBs | WRs | TEs | Cs | OTs | OGs 
- DEs | DTs | ILBs | OLBs | Ss | CBs

2010 NFL Post-Combine Draft Rankings
- Top 32 Talents | 2nd Rounders | 3rd Rounders | 4th Rounders
- 5th Rounders | 6th Rounders | 7th Rounders & Top Free Agents  
- 2009 Post-Combine Top 250 Rankings

What happens when you combine the real, live, on-field production of the college careers of all the top NFL prospects with raw workout numbers and practices? The CFN Top 250 players for the 2011 NFL Draft. Please note, this isn't a prediction or a projection of where the prospects will go. Instead, it's a ranking based on apparent talent, safety, risk, and the potential to be a bona fide NFL starter. These are the best 250 prospects regardless of position.

33. CB Brandon Harris, Miami 5-9, 191
Post-Combine Skinny: He was way too slow for his size. He looks fast on tape and in games, but the 4.51 was tough considering he doesn’t have the bulk to ever be moved to safety. Very quick, he showed his athleticism in the cone drill and the ball drills, but he didn’t do much to move up.
Positives: Fast. Plays fast on the field and times well enough off of it. Doesn’t get beaten deep. … Tough as nails. He’s not soft in any way and he has no problems sticking his nose into a running play. … Great instincts. Doesn’t make a lot of mistakes and doesn’t waste any steps.
Negatives: Fast, but not a jaw-dropping blazer. He’ll have to get used to facing faster receivers. … Didn’t do enough when the ball was in the air. He only picked off four passes in 39 games. … A good all-around corner with zero bust potential, but he doesn’t have elite skills.

34. TE Kyle Rudolph, Notre Dame 6-6, 259
Post-Combine Skinny: He still wasn’t healthy enough to run, but he measured well. He proved he was big and had some of the longest arms of any of the tight ends. He’s still the No. 1 tight end in a light class, but the scouts are going to want to see more when he’s able to run and lift.
Positives: Has all the tools to be a terrific all-around NFL tight end. Great size and excellent speed. … Good strength. Is a good blocker who isn’t afraid to get dirty for the ground game. … Like a wide receiver in the body of a big blocking end. Can do it all.
Negatives: Durability. Had to fight though a hamstring injury two years ago and missed half of last year hurt again. … Wasn’t a big time pass catcher even though the offense bombed away. … Can be a better blocker. Not a bad one, but he’s hardly a road grader.

35. QB Ryan Mallett, Arkansas 6-6, 240
Positives: Arm, arm, arm, arm, arm, ARM. No NFL receiver will be able to outrun his deep passes, and when he gets time to set up, he can put the ball through the eye of a needle. He has a major league fastball. … Size. He’s a big, strong passer who can see over linemen and reads the field extremely well. … While he’s better in the shotgun, he doesn’t need a whole bunch of work at learning how to get under center. His mechanics are close to NFL ready.
Negatives: He might be big and he might be strong, and he’s not afraid to take a big shot, but get a body on him and his accuracy and his production go bye-bye. There will be times when a decent NFL pass rush shuts him and his offense down cold. … Is compared to Ryan Leaf for a variety of reasons. The talent and tools are there, but he’s going to rub some people the wrong way. He’ll have to prove to the GMs that he’s willing to become a filmroom rat and will be willing to put in the time to be special. … He has gotten by on a thunderbolt of an arm, and he relies on it too much taking too many chances. … While he can move relatively well for his size, he’s far, FAR better when he gets a clean pocket to step up and fire.

36. ILB Quan Sturdivant, North Carolina 6-1, 241
Positives: A very tough, very good tackler. He doesn’t miss any stops and was a high producer for a strong defense. … Moves well in traffic. Is able to get through the trash to come up with a play. He finds ways to come up with the hit. … Knows what he’s doing and is a natural football player. He doesn’t take many wasted steps.
Negatives: Got bigger this offseason. Played about ten pounds lighter and has to prove he can produce and be as quick with the bigger bulk. … Not an elite athlete. He’s not necessarily a sideline-to-sideline player and makes most of his plays between the hashes. … Had a hamstring problem last year. He might have a short shelf life with the way he plays.

37. OLB Bruce Carter, North Carolina 6-2, 241
Positives: Superior athleticism, at least on the field. He water-skis off the edge and is fluid on his cuts. He can be used in a variety of ways and can become a playmaker inside or out. … Solid in pass coverage. He’s fluid enough to cut and chase to hang with any running back. … If he gets the right coaching and has he right fire lit under him, he could be a much stronger pro than a collegian.
Negatives: Isn’t nearly physical enough. He moves well and he’s a willing tackler, but he’s far better at chasing down plays than holding up against the power running teams. … The effort is fine, but he’s not in on as many plays as he needs to be. With his athleticism, he should make far more assisted tackles. … Not used as much as a pass rusher later on in his college career. Didn’t get better and had a somewhat disappointing senior season.

38. OG/OT Orlando Franklin, Miami 6-6, 315
Positives: Athletic enough to possibly be a right tackle after moving outside in his final year. Looked the part in college, but he could be a far stronger regular at guard. … Great for the running game. Goes to the whistle and has a great motor. … Buries blockers and never gives up ground when he has control.
Negatives: Might be a tweener. He’s not necessarily a strong tackle prospect and he’s not exactly built to be a guard. … Not quick enough on the outside and could struggle a bit in pass protection inside. … Can he stay in shape? He was all over the map with his weight over his career.

39. DT Drake Nevis, LSU 6-1, 294
Positives: A great playmaker in the backfield. He’s great off the ball and he has the quickness to be a dominator in the right scheme. … Always working and always with the motor on. He’s never going to stop. … He’ll try to get better. Very coachable, very good character, and he’ll make sure he’s a productive player.
Negatives: Not huge. He’s a short, squatty player who lacks the raw bulk to be on the nose. He might have to be a three-technique tackle and that’s it. … He’ll need to be on a line with bigger, stronger players. He’s not going to be anyone’s anchor. … Can he play against the power running teams? He’ll get beaten on and might be a part of a rotation.

40. RB Ryan Williams, Virginia Tech, 5-10, 205
Positives: Fast, quick, and zips. He needs just a little bit of room and he’ll cut and fly. … Smooth as silk. Moves effortlessly can be a game-changer if he’s not asked to be a workhorse. … A strong receiver prospect and will be used in a variety of ways.
Negatives: Not built to be a 20-carry back. He has to be a part of a rotation. … He won’t bring any power at an NFL level. He’ll have to be used on the outside. … Missed most of 2010 and has to prove he can last. He thinks he’s a workhorse, but isn’t.

41. DT Christian Ballard, Iowa 6-4, 283
Positives: Extremely quick and very athletic. He has the build and the pop to be a great 3-4 end. … Gets to the ball carrier down the field if needed and he’s not going to stay blocked. … Looks smooth. He has the ability to be a big producer just on physical tools.
Negatives: Not consistent. A good college player who benefitted by being next to some great players. … Does he want it? He’s not known for being a fire-eater. Needs to get pushed. … More of a workout guy than a top shelf player. He has to get stronger to be a true tackle and might be a tweener.

42. OG/C Rodney Hudson, Florida State, (C) 6-2, 291
Positives: Ultra-productive four-year starter who got the call in 48 of 51 career games. … Extremely athletic who moves well and can be used in a variety of ways. He fires off the ball with terrific agility. … Doesn’t make mistakes and doesn’t need any work. Ready to start from Day One. Polished. … Could be a center.
Negatives: Not big enough. He’s going to have to fight to get to over 300 pounds and stay there. … Not a mauler. He needs to be in the right system where he can shine in a zone-blocking scheme. … Could get overwhelmed by the monster defensive tackles with big bulk.

43. OLB Justin Houston, Georgia 6-3, 270
Positives: An elite pass rushing prospect who might just be scratching the surface. In the right scheme and with the right coaching staff, he could be the best pass rusher of all the outside linebackers. … Big. Could easily be a defensive end and not lose a thing. He’s a secure tackler. … As versatile as they come, he’ll be used in a variety of ways and won’t have to work at playing anywhere on the outside. Finishes well as a tackler and when he gets a bead on a quarterback.
Negatives: Disappeared way too often. The numbers might be great, but he wasn’t consistent. … Does he want to be an elite player? He doesn’t have a high revving motor and might need a kick in the pants. … Not great against the pass. He isn’t going to be asked to do too much on third downs other than get into the backfield.

44. OG/OT Marcus Cannon, TCU 6-5,, 363
Positives: A tackle with the size to be a guard. He moves extremely well for his size and he should be able to do a little of everything for a line. He’ll find a starting job. … Insane strength. He should be a dominant guard for the ground game. … Has all the tools. He has the potential to be a special guard.
Negatives: He needs a fire lit under him to become a special blocker. It’s all there to be a great guard or an okay right tackle, but he needs to harness all his talent. … Doesn’t seem to have the jerkweed trait needed to destroy defenders. … Right tackle only if he ends up on the outside. The feet aren’t quite there to be a left tackle.

45. DT Phil Taylor, Baylor 6-3, 334
Positives: A massive, MASSIVE interior presence and, possibly, the purest nose tackle in the draft. … Owns the inside and turned into a bigger producer as his season went on. The former Penn State transfer finally maximized his potential with a whopper of a senior year. … Engulfs blockers. He can handle double teams without a problem.
Negatives: He’s not known for keeping the motor running. He didn’t exactly turn it on 100% of the time. … He’s not going to be a pass rusher and he might come off the field on third downs. … He has to keep his weight in check. He could quickly balloon up without working on it.

46. OLB Dontay Moch, Nevada 6-1, 248
Positives: Elite athlete. Seriously scary speed and can be used as a blur into the backfield. Made a whopping 30 career tackles and 63 tackles for loss. … A willing run stopper. Not just a pass rushing specialist, he’ll hold up against the power offenses. … Will be turned loose at the next level. He’ll end up being a one-trick pony and a third down specialist, and he’ll be phenomenal.
Negatives: Not all that big and can’t be a defensive end. He moves faster than most defensive backs, but he’ll get knocked off his route to the quarterback with a good shove. … Still needs work. Got by in the WAC be being light-years more athletic than anyone else. … Not all that strong when locked on. He doesn’t shed blocks well enough.

47. FS Rahim Moore, UCLA 6-0, 202
Positives: Has a knack for getting to the ball and making plays. Was an interception machine as a sophomore with ten picks. … Moves like a corner and could end up moving outside if needed. He has the ball skills to be a playmaker no matter where he is. … Wants to be a player. He’s a tough, smart player who wants to ball.
Negatives: A bit slight for a safety. A bit rangy and is built more like a corner. … A good tackler, but not a great one. He whiffs a bit too much in the open field. … Not an intimidator. He’s a finesse defender who’s better in coverage than in run support.

48. QB Christian Ponder, Florida State 6-4, 225
Positives: There’s a general feeling that it’s all there, but he has yet to show everything he can do. He might just be scratching the surface and could be the type of player who blossoms in a pro environment. … He has good enough size, excellent mobility, and has unquestioned leadership skills. The tools are there, the attitude is right, and want-to is there to become a special player and the face of a franchise. … Accurate and consistent, he can get into a groove and doesn’t get shaken out of it easily. … While he’s not at the Cam Newton level, he moves well and is one of the better running quarterbacks in the draft. … Very, very smart.
Negatives: Health. He was constantly battered and beaten up with a slew of injuries. On the plus side, he’s willing to take a shot. On the negative, he’s willing to take a shot and he got hammered way too much for his body to take. … While he looks the part, he didn’t always play like it. Everyone was waiting for him to take his game and his offense to another level, and it didn’t happen. … The arm is adequate and he can make all the throws, but it’s hardly an elite arm. He can’t rely on his arm to make every throw in every situation like other top quarterbacks in this draft class can. … For good and bad, think of him as Matt Schaub. He can work out and he can be good, but he has to be in the right system and his health will always have coaches holding their breath.

49. SS DeAndre McDaniel, Clemson 6-0, 217
Positives: Excellent size and uses it well. He’s like another linebacker but doesn’t move like it. … Gets moving in a hurry. Cuts well and is good at planting and going. … A strong, willing tackler who isn’t afraid to get his nose dirty. Not a finesse player, but he can run like one.
Negatives: Not the most secure tackler. Bounces a bit at times. … Not the best of coverage defenders. Made a slew of plays in college that he won’t make in the pros. … Gets blocked way too easily. Gets buried.

50. ILB Kelvin Sheppard, LSU (OLB)
51. CB Jimmy Smith, Colorado 6-2, 211
Positives: The measureables are there. He’s very big, very fast, and is physical. He can shove around the bigger receivers. … Could end up being a killer of a safety. He’s a corner for now, but with his skills and his frame he could be a Pro Bowl free safety with a little bit of time and work. … He has the frame to get bigger. He could end up being a big, cut 220 pounds without losing a thing.
Negatives: Smooth as a three-day beard. Tight, TIGHT hips and doesn’t move all that well. He’s big, and he moves like it. … Not a great pass defender. A better pass defender and tackler than a pure cover corner. … Will get blown away by any quick receiver he doesn’t get his hands on.

52. QB Colin Kaepernick, Nevada 6-5, 225
Positives: Great size. Tall, long, and looks the part of a possible NFL quarterback stature-wise. … Mobility. He’s one of the best running quarterbacks in the draft and one of the best in college football history. He’s a weapon out of the pocket. … Major-league fastball, literally. A pitcher, he had the option to give baseball a shot. … All the positives of Vince Young coming out of college, but with a far better head on his shoulders.
Negatives: Not from a passing program. Spent the last four years running the Pistol offense and needs work as a pro-style passer. … Takes ten years to get the ball out of his hands. He needs a far, far more compact throwing motion. … The potential is there, but he needs a ton of polish.

53. SS Robert Sands, West Virginia 6-4, 217
Positives: Extremely intruiging size and skills. He’s a very tall, very cut 6-4 and he as intimidating as they come. … HUGE hitter. Blows up anyone with the ball and makes them think twice before ever coming his way. … Closes well. Great at helping out.
Negatives: A bit too stiff because of his size. Has a hard time dropping down and cutting. … A bit of an attitude. Needs to be pushed a bit and has to be coached up. … Still raw. He might be a strong nickel back and he’ll need time to harness his unique skills.

54. QB Jake Locker, Washington, 6-3, 230
Positives: It’s all there from a physical standpoint. He’s big, strong, has the NFL arm, has the NFL size, and has the mobility to take off from time to time. … Great character. A baller who’ll do whatever it takes to lead the team and try to get the win. … One of the fastest quarterbacks in the draft.
Negatives: Can’t throw with any semblance of consistency. He’s not nearly accurate enough on a regular basis and needs tuning. Lots and lots of tuning to put the ball where it needs to be on timing routes. … He has all the throws in the book, but he doesn’t anticipate well enough. Relies on his arm strength to make up for slow reads. … Takes too many big shots. For good and bad, he’s willing to sacrifice himself for the play.

55. DE Jabaal Sheard, Pitt 6-3, 264
Positives: Very quick off the ball and goes from 0-to-60 in a hiccup. Grew into a stronger pass rusher. … Fights hard and works to get into the backfield. He doesn’t take plays off. … A hybrid with just enough athleticism to work as an outside linebacker or a 4-3 end.
Negatives: Needs to be far better against the run. He’ll struggle as a true lineman against the power teams. … Injury concerns. Nothing major, but he was always trying to fight through something that kept him from letting it rip. … Not big. He had to work to get up past 260 pounds and doesn’t have much room to get bigger.

56. RB Demarco Murray, Oklahoma, 6-0, 214
Positives: Extremely versatile. Can run, catch, return kicks, and do anything an offense needs him to do. … A pure scorer with a whopping 65 career total touchdowns. … A speed back in the size of a power runner. He finishes off runs extremely well and cuts like a smallish runner.
Negatives: Health. He has a lot of hard miles on him after overcoming a variety of injuries. … Short shelf life. He takes huge shots and doesn’t get small enough to avoid them. … Might be more of a receiver and returner than a regular running back.

57. C/OG Stefen Wisniewski, Penn State 6-3, 295
Positives: An athletic blocker who could be a whale of a player in a zone blocking scheme. He could play center or guard. … Always working and always going full tilt. He did everything to be the main man for average Penn State lines. … Very tough. Can’t get him off the field.
Negatives: Not big. He doesn’t look the part of a guard and struggled at times this year. Is a far better center prospect. … He’s not going to beat anyone up. He’s a finesse blocker at the next level and won’t bury anyone. … There’s a limit on what he can become unless he’s a center in the right system.

58. OG/OT Benjamin Ijalana, Villanova 6-4, 319
Positives: Call him the big question mark. If he’s healthy, he has the tools and the skills to be the best blocker in the draft either at tackle of guard. … Almost perfect frame. He’s tall, lean, and long. He’s already close to 320 pounds, and he can get even stronger without a problem. … Moves well. Doesn’t have a problem when he’s on the run.
Negatives: Double hernia surgery. He wasn’t able to go at the Senior Bowl and it might be tough to get a proper read on him just before the draft. … The tools are all there, but he hasn’t gone against the top defenders enough to get a good read on him. … Could stand to have a fire lit under him. He has gotten by on tools, but he might need to be pushed to reach his full potential.

59. ILB Greg Jones, Michigan State 6-0, 242
Positives: Ultra-productive. One of the best linebackers in college football over the last three years and had a tremendous four-year run making 465 stops. … A leader and instinctive. He knows exactly what to do and he knows how to help out everyone around him. He doesn’t take a wasted step. … Doesn’t miss a stop. If he gets to the ball, it’s over.
Negatives: Not all that big. He’s not athletic enough to work on the outside and he doesn’t have brutish raw strength to be anyone’s middle linebacker. He might need to work in a 3-4. … Best when battling to get to the ball. He’s not necessarily going to chase down too many NFL ball carriers. … Can get erased by anyone who locks on. He’s slippery, but he needs to always keep moving.

60. RB Daniel Thomas, Kansas State, 6-0, 225
Positives: Great size and did a great job of producing even though he was the target of every defensive gameplan. … Gets to the hole in a hurry. Quick for a big back and changes direction like a far smaller back. … A good receiver who could be far stronger a pass catcher when he gets more opportunities.
Negatives: Not powerful enough at his size. He’s not going to pound it like he should for a 225-pound runner. … Quick, but not fast. He’s not going to come up with any home runs. … Questions about handling an NFL playbook. Missed 2008 to work on his academics.

61. TE Lance Kendricks, Wisconsin 6-3, 243
Post-Combine Skinny: Seemed a bit nervous during the workout with way too many drops. He fought the ball way too much, but he looked fluid running and was extremely quick through the drills. He was one of the fastest tight ends in the shuttle and came up with terrific 25 reps on the bench.
Positives: A terrific pass catcher who has the moves of a receiver. Fluid. … A strong blocker, especially down the field. He does what’s needed to come up with the big hit. … Athletic. Plays bigger and faster than most of the tight ends in the draft.
Negatives: Not huge. He’s a willing blocker, but he’s not going to flatten anyone. … He has to show he can do more once he gets the ball in his hands. He was mostly a deep play threat. … Will disappear for stretches and can get erased by a real corner who’s trying to cover him.

62. OT Derek Sherrod, Mississippi State 6-6, 312
Positives: Huge base. He has the anchor strength to potentially move to guard if needed. … Moves extremely well for a player of his size. He looks big and bulky, but he’s an athlete. … A technician in pass protection. Doesn’t get beat even when someone gets a step on him.
Negatives: Isn’t quite an NFL athlete to become a left tackle. … He doesn’t destroy defenders like he should for a player of his bulk. He needs to put more players into the ground. … Could be good at all positions but not dominant at any one.

63. WR Greg Little, North Carolina 6-2, 215
Positives: The potential is there to be terrific. Great size, great strength, and extremely physical. … He’ll push around NFL defensive backs. No one will outmuscle him, and he has the strength to bust through tackles. … Former running back who’ll hit people. He’ll block without a problem.
Negatives: Attitude and character. Beyond getting suspended all of last year, he’s also going to have to prove he wants to be a special player and will do all the little things needed to work his craft. … Not fast. His game is about being physical. He’s not going to blow past anyone. … Not for every offense. He could end up being just an inside target who doesn’t have to stretch the field.

64. WR Randall Cobb, Kentucky 5-11, 185
Positives: Did it all for Kentucky. Was a quarterback when he had to be, was a runner, was a returner, and was a top receiver who got better once he concentrated mostly on being a No. 1 target. … Extremely quick. Gets in and out of his breaks in a heartbeat. … Will work to be better. Great effort player.
Negatives: Not big. He doesn’t have NFL No. 1 size and might end up being forced to be just a slot target … Not a deadly blazer for his size. He’s not fast, but he’s not deadly. … Not physical. He’ll get beaten up at times.