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2011 NFL Draft - The CFN Top 250 (6th Round)
Iowa QB Ricky Stanzi
Iowa QB Ricky Stanzi
CollegeFootballNews.com
Posted Mar 3, 2011


After the Combine, CFN's Top 250 Draft Prospects for 2011. Here are the players with sixth round talent.

2011 NFL Post-Combine

6th Round Talents


2011 NFL Post-Combine Draft Rankings
- Top 32 Talents | 2nd Rounders | 3rd Rounders | 4th Rounders
- 5th Rounders | 6th Rounders | 7th Rounders & Top Free Agents  

2011 NFL Combine Position Analysis
- QBs | RBs | WRs | TEs | Cs | OTs | OGs 
- DEs | DTs | ILBs | OLBs | Ss | CBs

2011 NFL Combine Results

- QBs | RBs | WRs | TEs | Cs | OTs | OGs 
- DEs | DTs | ILBs | OLBs | Ss | CBs

2010 NFL Post-Combine Draft Rankings
- Top 32 Talents | 2nd Rounders | 3rd Rounders | 4th Rounders
- 5th Rounders | 6th Rounders | 7th Rounders & Top Free Agents  
- 2009 Post-Combine Top 250 Rankings

What happens when you combine the real, live, on-field production of the college careers of all the top NFL prospects with raw workout numbers and practices? The CFN Top 250 players for the 2011 NFL Draft. Please note, this isn't a prediction or a projection of where the prospects will go. Instead, it's a ranking based on apparent talent, safety, risk, and the potential to be a bona fide NFL starter. These are the best 250 prospects regardless of position.

161. OT Derek Hall, Stanford 6-4, 306
Positives: Provides a big pop and gets off the ball extremely well. He attacks defenders. … Moves well. Can work in any system if given enough time to progress. … A nice athlete who isn’t stiff. He’s a natural right tackle who might be just scratching the surface.
Negatives: He’ll need time. A former defensive tackle, he’s still learning the subtleties of the position and lacks the feel. … He doesn’t use his body or his frame well. He has long arms that tend to be wasted by getting hit early. … Needs to get stronger. He’s a tall athlete who doesn’t have the beef.

162. DE Cliff Matthews, South Carolina 6-4, 257
Positives: A great frame and he looks the part. He’s a long, lean defensive end and can carry more weight without much of a problem. … Always working and always doing something to try to make a play. He was extremely consistent and tries to get better. He’ll make himself into a player. … Very tough. He’ll make plays on want-to, and he has just enough athleticism to get by.
Negatives: Not smooth and not fluid. He’s not necessarily an outside linebacker and he’s not big and thick enough to be a 4-3 defensive end. … Not a creative pass rusher. He comes up with plays behind the line, but he’s limited in his repertoire. … Hard ceiling. Not a good enough athlete to be a special player and will likely be a cog in the system.

163. OLB/DE Chris Carter, Fresno State 6-1, 248
Positives: A pure pass rusher who turned into a whale of a playmaker in his senior year. The team desperately needed someone to become a force in the backfield, and he answered the call. … A great closer. When he gets a step and a shot at a quarterback, it’s over. … Coachable. He’s a natural, high-energy player with a revving motor. He’ll work to make himself better and impressed the staffs at the East-West Shrine practices.
Negatives: Not all that big. He was a college defensive end who’ll have to get used to working as a true outside linebacker. He’ll have to show he’s more than a pass rusher. … Just okay against the run. He bounces off the more physical runners. … Got by on being a better athlete than just about everyone in the WAC. That’s not going to work at the next level.

164. RB Darren Evans, Virginia Tech, 6-0, 220
Positives: When he was 100% healthy, he was a tough, powerful runner who managed to always produce. … A tough pounder who has just enough wiggle to slide through the interior. … Better hands than he showed in college. He could be a surprising receiver.
Negatives: SLOWWWWW. The torn ACL before the 2009 season didn’t help. … He might be purely an inside power runner. He’s not going to zip in and out of traffic and will end up being a straight-line runner. … He doesn’t do anything special at an NFL level. He’ll stick on a team, but he’ll have to be a special teamer early on.

165. RB Delone Carter, Syracuse, 5-9, 225
Positives: A workhorse over the last two seasons with over 500 touches, he proved he could handle being the entire offense. … Tough for his size. Can work inside and seems to like to take a pounding. … A player. He runs like he likes playing football and he can be used for ten carries a game to soften up a defense.
Negatives: Not fast. He’s not going to pull away from anyone. … While he’s thick and strong, he’s not all that big he doesn’t get small. He’ll take some big shots. … Some durability issues after missing the 2007 season with a hip injury. With his running style, he has a short shelf life.

166. TE Lee Smith, Marshall 6-6, 266
Post-Combine Skinny: Was the tallest tight end at the Combine, and he looked the part of a big receiver. The 25 reps on the bench were great, but the 5.01 40 was lumbering and potentially disastrous when combined with the lack of explosion in the broad jump. He flew through the shuttle drill and was fine catching the ball.
Positives: Very tall and has good hands. Has the body and the frame to be a pass catcher. … A good blocker who likes to get physical. He has the frame to add even more weight. … One of the best blocking tight ends in the draft and can be used like another tackle.
Negatives: Slow. He doesn’t get off the ball in a hurry and doesn’t do anything with the ball in his hands. … Marginally productive. Didn’t come up with a slew of big plays in college. … Isn’t natural in and out of his cuts. He’s not a creative route runner.

167. RB Roy Helu, Jr., Nebraska 5-11, 216
Positives: Owns a great mix of size and speed. Is built to handle running inside, and has the breakaway speed to take it deep. … Has the tools and the skills. He’ll have some coaching staff wondering how he can be cut. … Streaky. When he was on for the Huskers, he was unstoppable.
Negatives: Inconsistent and struggled to fight through injuries. Needed to be 100% to produce at a high level. … Isn’t powerful enough for a big back. He’s more of a finesse runner. … He’ll look the part in drills, but it doesn’t always translate to the field.

168. RB Da’Rel Scott, Maryland 5-11, 205
Positives: Extremely speed with good size. He’ll wow the scouts in workouts and will be used as a key special teamer and a possible receiver. … Tough. Not a finesse back despite his great speed and his game. … A gamebreaker. As long as a team is only looking for him to handle the ball a few times a game, he could bring a huge payoff.
Negatives: Major injury problems. He has been banged up and missed way too much time. Forget about counting on him for a full season. … Will break hearts with fumbles. He could get whacked in a camp if he starts putting it on the ground. … Purely a part of a rotation. He only has a few NFL 20-carry games in him if he gets the chance.

169. QB Ricky Stanzi, Iowa, 6-4, 225
Positives: Nice size and stature. Good height with the ability to throw over linemen and not around them. He looks the part of an NFL pocket passer. … Great ability to come through in the clutch. Didn’t do it as much in 2010, but he was phenomenal late throughout 2009. … He throws a nicer deep ball than he gets credit for. If given time, he can deliver.
Negatives: Inconsistent. He often had to come up with big comebacks because he didn’t do enough on a regular basis over the first 50 minutes. … Inconsistent. Will fit the ball through the eye of the needle on one throw, and put it into the fourth row on the next pass. … A flake. While he’s a good leader, he’s got a bit of a goofy streak that won’t work if he’s not great.

170. TE Virgil Green, Nevada 6-3, 249
Post-Combine Skinny: The star of Saturday. He didn’t measure all that big, but he showed off special athleticism. With a shocking vertical of over 42 inches while ripping off a 4.64 in the 40. The 10’10” broad jump was special, blowing away the No. 2 tight end by eight inches. He caught the ball effortlessly.
Positives: An elite athlete, he runs extremely well and is as fluid as they come. … Strong for the running game and is used to being just a part of the system. … Nice hands. Adjusts to the ball extremely well.
Negatives: Was never a go-to target playing in a running system. … Not huge. More of an H-Back than a true tight end, and while he’ll be a willing blocker, he’s not a devastating one. … More of an athlete and a workout warrior than a dangerous prospect. He won’t work in every offense.

171. RB Damien Berry, Miami, 5-11, 212
Positives: Could be a big surprise because of his power and his strength. Could be someone’s victory cigar as the type of back who can close out games with tough runs. … A good blocker and a willing special teamer. He’ll fill a variety of roles. … Never, ever puts the ball on the ground.
Negatives: Not wiggle and little burst. … He doesn’t have enough pop to be anything more than a power runner. He can’t be used on the outside. … No hard cutting ability. He’ll be a one-trick runner who’ll go straight ahead and will need blocks to produce.

172. WR Cecil Shorts, Mount Union 6-0, 200
Positives: A nice combination of skills with good size, great speed, and terrific hands. … Superior production catching a whopping 247 passes and scored 60 times over the last three years. … Good leader and good character. Will take the question marks about playing at a lower level and will use it for positive motivation.
Negatives: Good speed, not great speed. He’s not going to blow past anyone and might be limited to becoming a solid possession receiver. … Not strong. Needs to get far more physical and far stronger to beat the jam on a regular basis. … Only decent in and out of his cuts. Managed to look better because of the competition.

173. CB Jalil Brown, Colorado 6-1, 204
Post-Combine Skinny: For a big corner, the 4.55 wasn’t bad. More impressive were the 24 reps on the bench showing the strength and the potential to move around where needed in a secondary. He’s still a work in progress, but he showed good measurables.
Positives: Good size. He could quickly be turned into a safety or a tough nickel defender. … Extremely strong and makes lots of tackles and lots of plays. He brings a good attitude and will do whatever a coaching staff wants. … Battles hard. He’s a competitor.
Negatives: Not quite as physical as he should be for his size. He should maul more receivers and bring far more pop. … Lacks the deep speed and will struggle against the faster receivers. Will need help and can’t be on an island. … Will get by on want-to and attitude more than physical ability. He’ll get picked on.

174. CB Chykie Brown, Texas 5-11, 190
Post-Combine Skinny: Very, very quick and very, very smooth. He might not be a tape-guy, but he looked good in the short drills and moved extremely well. The 4.5 wasn’t bad considering he’s about being more quick than fast.
Positives: Very quick and good all-around athleticism. Fluid, he moves extremely well and changes directions on a dime. … Good size and a nice frame. He’s long and could put on another few pounds without a problem. … Scratching the surface. Could be a far better pro than a collegian.
Negatives: Mediocre production. Only two picks, both in 2009, in 47 career games. ... Nothing special against the run. He’ll tackle, but he’s not great at it. … Doesn’t seem to have the same feel for the game like other top Texas defensive backs.

175. FS Chris Conte, California 6-2, 197
Positives: Good size with a long, lean frame and good length. Plays a bit bigger than his size. … Always hustling. Makes a lot of plays on energy, desire, and want-to. … Always around the ball. Has a nice burst to get to the play at the last second.
Negatives: A good tackler, but not a dramatic one. He doesn’t bring a lot of pop. … Not bulky. He can add a bit to his frame, but he’s a free safety. … Okay in pass coverage, but he doesn’t get over the top in a hurry. Is better when he gets to read and react.

176. RB Vai Taua, Nevada, 5-10, 211
Positives: Ultra-productive, he’s the type of back who could be tremendously productive in the right system. He could be Arian Foster in a Houston Texan attack. … Physical and tough when fighting through tacklers. Won’t always go down with one shot. … Doesn’t make mistakes. Almost never fumbles and always seemed to make the right cut.
Negatives: Not zippy enough for his style of play, and he’s not powerful enough to be a pure power back. … The speed might not be there once he pounds through a hole. … While he has good hands, he has to prove he can be a receiver.

177. FB Stanley Havili, USC, 6-0, 230
Positives: A top receiver who’s a natural when the ball comes his way. He caught 116 passes at USC. … A good runner when he got his chance averaging six yards per carry. … Possibly the best athlete among the fullbacks. He can actually be used as a big tailback from time to time.
Negatives: He’s not going to beat anyone up. He’s not a big, blasting blocker and will have to be in the right system. … Needs an NFL weight room and needs to get bigger. … Not powerful enough of a runner considering his size and position.

178. QB Greg McElroy, Alabama, 6-2, 225
Positives: Extremely smart. A Rhodes Scholar finalist. … A gutty baller. While he didn’t play all that well in the 2011 BCS Championship, he was playing through a rib problem. … A good, accurate arm that can be functional in the pros. He’ll put the ball where it needs to be.
Negatives: The big-time arm isn’t there. He’s not going to put the ball all over the field and needs to be in a short-to-midrange passing attack. … Needs major, MAJOR work on his throwing motion. It’s not nearly compact enough and it’s a bit unorthodox. … A game-manager, and not necessarily in a positive way. He won’t carry an NFL team, but he could be the Baltimore Ravens’ version of Trent Dilfer at some point down the road.

179. CB Chris Culliver, South Carolina (FS) 6-0, 199 
Positives: Part safety and part corner, he’s versatile enough to play just about anywhere in the secondary. … Extremely fast and moves well. He runs well enough to handle himself at corner and looks like he belongs one-on-one against a receiver. … Decent size. Physical enough to get by.
Negatives: Not really a NFL corner and not really an NFL safety. There’s not a sure-thing place and position for him. … Not a big hitter. He’ll tackle, but he’s not going to blast anyone. … Looks the part more than he plays it. He’ll test well, but he’ll have to be a cog in a system.

180. TE Rob Housler, Florida Atlantic 6-5, 248 
Positives: A terrific athlete, he’s a field stretcher with excellent speed. … He’s the type of player you want on the team. He’ll do whatever it takes to try to make the team better. … A solid receiver with the upside to do far more as a pro than as a collegian.
Negatives: He’s not going to block anyone. He has no blast to his hits. … Could be purely an H-back, and he needs to be a more creative route runner. … He’s not a natural pass catcher and fights the ball a bit.
 
181. SS Joe Lefeged, Rutgers (SS) 6-0, 210
Positives: A smooth athlete who runs well on the field. He’s a strong safety who could easily be a free safety. … A peerless special teamer. He’ll be invaluable because of his versatility. He could be a good nickel or dime defender and a difference maker on special teams. … Always working. Plays to the whistle and beyond.
Negatives: Okay in coverage, but he’s hardly anything special. Made just two picks in 50 games. … Doesn’t do any one thing all that well for a defense. He’ll make it on special teams. … Not a blazer. He tends to get a bit lost at times and makes tackles down the field.

182. QB Pat Devlin, Delaware 6-4, 230
Positives: He’s ready for a high-tech passing offense. He’s used to winging the ball all over the field and has the touch to put his receivers in good situations. … He looks like an NFL passer. He doesn’t need much work on his motion or his feet. … Nice reading ability. Great at anticipating the routes and throwing it where it needs to be. … Extremely accurate.
Negatives: Not Joe Flacco. Repeat, NOT JOE FLACCO. Just because he’s tall and went to Delaware, that doesn’t mean he’s the same prospect. … Good arm, but not a great one. He can’t make up for misreads with a fastball. … A very, very good FCS quarterback, but he has to prove he can handle the better competition. Again, he’s not Flacco and doesn’t have the same type of gun to overcome negatives.

184. PK/P Alex Henery, Nebraska 6-1. 178
Positives: Huge leg. He can blast away from anywhere and can kickoff. He can hold down a few roster spots and could end up being a punter. … Always comes through. Ice-water in his veins. … Accurate. Nailed 68-of-76 career field goals.
Negatives: He’s not an NFL punter without some work. … Has the big leg, but he’s not always accurate from deep. Most misses are from 50 yards out, though.

185. TE Weslye Saunders, South Carolina 6-5, 270 
Positives: Very big and uses his body well in the passing game. He’s a matchup problem with the way he walls off defenders. … Great hands. He always came through when targeted. … Came up with nice games against top competition. Moves surprisingly well for his size.
Negatives: Character. He was booted off the team last year after dealing with an agent. … Decent production, but not enough. He only made 32 catches in 2009 after coming up with 28 combined in his first two seasons. … Not nearly physical enough for his size. Very, very soft and doesn’t’ block like he should.

186. QB Nathan Enderle, Idaho 6-4, 240
Positives: Very big, very strong. Throws it all over the field and is used to winging it around. … Great throwing motion. He looks like an pro-style thrower with a tight motion and a quick release. … A smart, tough veteran. Extremely seasoned after seeing four years of college work. … Productive. He threw for over 10,000 career yards and 74 touchdowns.
Negatives: He threw 60 picks. While he had to keep throwing the ball to make up for a bad defense, he forced too many plays that weren’t there. … The arm doesn’t quite match his size. He’s not going to bomb it deep. … Needs footwork help. Gets a bit too jumpy under pressure.

187. FB Henry Hynoski, Pitt   6-2, 260
Positives: HUGE. A big, tough, beat-him-up blocker who’ll be a great bodyguard for a smallish runner. … Good enough receiving skills to be a tight end or an H-back. Extremely versatile. … Will do everything. He wants to be a good football player and will work at it.
Negatives: Not really a runner. He’s not going to be a ball-carrier and will only see the rock as a receiver. … Not a goal line runner in college with just one rushing touchdown. … Not athletic enough to be a top-shelf H-back. He’ll be good at a lot of things, but he won’t be great at anything but blocking for the ground game.

188. WR Jock Sanders, West Virginia 5-6, 175
Positives: Phenomenal speed. Untouchable quickness who’ll be uncoverable at times and will be terrific with the ball in his hands. … A top return prospect. Great at making the first man miss. … Can be used in a variety of ways. Might be a fun X factor for a top offensive coordinator to play around with.
Negatives: Extremely small. EXTREMELY small. Was even tinier than the scouts expected at the Senior Bowl. … Not physical in any way. He’s a willing blocker, but he won’t be able to do it. … Not nearly creative enough. He always relies on his tremendous quickness.

189. OT/OG Byron Bell, New Mexico 6-5, 340
Positives: Huge. Has the massive bulk to be a plowing guard or a wall of a right tackle. … Decent lateral movement for a player of his size. He has surprisingly decent feet. … A powerful blocker. Could be brilliant in a power running system.
Negatives: Not a left tackle in any way. Needs a lot of technique work. … Has gotten by on his bulk and hasn’t developed into a polished all-around blocker. … Not an athlete. Forget about getting him down the field.

190. TE Julius Thomas, Portland State 6-5, 246 
Positives: One of the better athletes among the tight ends. He gets down the field in a hurry and he pops out of his cuts. … He has a good body and he has a little room to get bigger. There’s room to work. … Just scratching the surface. He only has one year of experience and looked great.
Negatives: Only one career start in one season making just 29 catches. … While he looked great in post-season workouts and in East-West week, he needs a ton of polish and work. … He needs to hit the weights to go from being a basketball player to a blocker in the NFL. It’s going to take a while.

191. OT Kyle Hix, Texas 6-7, 325
Positives: A very tall, very long finesse player who could find a role in the right scheme. … Stronger than he plays. He has a lot of tools, and he could be a far better pro than a collegian if he’s in a zone-read system. … Attacks pass rushers before they come into him. Walls them off well.
Negatives: Not a power blocker in any way. He’s not going to flatten anyone. … Not quick enough to be anything but a right tackle. He doesn’t move well enough to handle anyone with speed. … A good guy, but he lacks the jerk streak needed to be a destructive blocker. Not known as a tough guy.

192. WR Armon Binns, Cincinnati 6-2, 211
Positives: Great size and is physical. Great at fighting and outmuscling for balls. … Terrific hands and catches everything thrown his way. Bails out quarterbacks with his adjustments. … Ultra-productive. Caught 21 touchdown passes over the last two seasons and was consistent.
Negatives: Lacks the needed wheels. He doesn’t have breakaway speed and won’t pull away from any NFL defensive back. … Not a great athlete. Doesn’t have any explosion and has to use his size to make plays against the better DBs. … Needs route running work. Can’t be anything but perfect on his cuts to make up for his lack of quickness.