Fiu, Cirminiello, Mitchell on TV - Campus Insiders | Buy College Football Tickets

2011 NFL Draft - Offensive Tackle Rankings
Gabe Carimi, Anthony Castonzo, Nate Solder
Gabe Carimi, Anthony Castonzo, Nate Solder
CollegeFootballNews.com
Posted Apr 9, 2011


There used to be a time when a 6-3, 290-pound offensive tackle was big. Now, 6-7 and 325 is the norm for several top prospects ... and they can all move. There might not be any superstars OTs in the 2011 NFL Draft, and the talent drops off immediately, but there are some interesting players up top. Check out the 2011 NFL Draft analysis of the top tackles.

2011 NFL Draft Position Rankings

Top Ten Offensive Tackles


By Pete Fiutak

- 2011 NFL Quarterback Rankings - No. 11 to 30

2011 NFL Post-Combine Draft Rankings
- Top 32 Talents
- 2nd Rounders
- 3rd Rounders
- 4th Rounders
- 5th Rounders
- 6th Rounders
- 7th Rounders & Top Free Agents  

2011 NFL Combine Position Analysis
- QB | RB | WR | TE
- C | OT | OG | DE
- DT | ILB | OLB | S | CB
- 2012's Top Returning NFL Prospects - Offense

THE 2010 NFL DRAFT


2010 CFN Talent Rankings
- 1st Rounders
- 2nd Rounders
- 3rd Rounders
- 4th Rounders
- 5th Rounders
- 6th Rounders
- 7th Rounders 
- Top Free Agent Talents 

2010 CFN Position Rankings & Analysis

- QBs | RBs | WRs | TEs
- Cs | OTs | OGs | DEs
- DTs | ILBs | OLBs
- Ss | CBs

2010 NFL Combine Quick Looks & Post-Combine Rankings

- QBs | RBs | WRs | TEs
- Cs | OTs | OGs | DEs
- DTs | ILBs | OLBs
- Ss | CBs

2010 NFL Combine Results
- QBs | RBs | WRs | TEs
- Cs | OTs | OGs | DEs
- DTs | ILBs | OLBs
- Ss | CBs 

2010 NFL Combine
- Offensive Winners  
- Offensive Losers 
- Defensive Winners 
- Defensive Losers

- 2011 NFL Offensive Tackle Rankings - No. 11 to 30

This Class Is … Tall. Not all that long ago, tackles were 6-4, 300-to-310 pounds at best, 290 pounds at worst. Now, the tackles aren’t just big, they’re very, very tall. Welcome to the world of the 6-7, 325-pound tackle being the norm … and they can move, too.

The Best Value Pick Will Be … James Brewer, Indiana
Most Underrated … Jah Reid, UCF
Most Overrated … Nate Solder, Colorado
The Deep, Deep Sleeper Is … Mike Person, Montana State

1. Tyron Smith, USC 6-5, 307 
Out of all the decent tackle prospects at the top of the chain, Smith has the biggest upside. Very athletic, he moves well and has the look of a ten-year fixture at left tackle. There will be criticisms and concerns that he only played right tackle throughout his career, but that’s really not that big a deal; he’ll be more than fine moving over to the other side. With a little bit of time and a little bit of work, he should be able to handle the best of the speed rushers, and he could be the ideal lineman for a zone-blocking scheme. However, he can play in any system and be fine. The one problem is that he’ll never be a mauler. He had to work his tail off – or on – to get to over 300 pounds over the last few months, but he’s not likely to ever be more than 310 pounds on a regular basis.
CFN Projection: First Round

2. Anthony Castonzo, Boston College 6-7, 311
Extremely smart and with impeccable character, he’s the type of player you want to be the leader of your line. With prototype size and great sliding skills as a pass protector, he’s a left tackle who should be more than fine right away, and he has the bulldozing skills to pound away for the ground game. However, he’s not a killer of a run blocker and he’s not going to throw anyone into the third row. While he’s never going to be a superstar, he should be a very good, very solid starter for a long time. There’s no bust potential.
CFN Projection: First Round

3. Gabe Carimi, Wisconsin 6-7, 314
Very, very big and very, very tough, the Outland Trophy winner beat up the best the brightest defensive linemen the Big Ten had to offer, and he was the key part of the puzzle on a great run blocking line. There’s no real work needing to be done with his technique or his style; plug him in and let him go. Can he stay healthy? He got cut way too much and was chopped down, but he still has injury concerns. While he might not be athletic enough to handle the speediest NFL pass rushers, he’ll be a very steady, very good starter for a decade somewhere on a line. Outside of injury concerns, there’s no real downside.
CFN Projection: First Round

4. Nate Solder, Colorado 6-8, 319
With great size and a fantastic frame, he’s tough to get around with long arms and the room to get even bigger and bulkier. However, there might not be much of a need to do much to get larger if it’ll cost him any of his great athleticism. Very quick and great on the move, he’s an ideal pass protector who’ll wall off pass rushers without a problem. He’ll also do the work needed to improve; he’s always trying to get better and he’ll be happy to do whatever the coaches ask. With his height and lack of strength, though, he’s not going to beat up anyone for the ground game. He needs to be in the right system, and he’s not going to work in a power-running attack.
CFN Projection: First Round

5. Benjamin Ijalana, Villanova (OG) 6-4, 319
Is he a guard or a tackle? Where he plays, he’s a massive, extremely strong prospect with just enough athleticism to get by. While he missed the Combine with a hernia problem, he was able to get through every game in his long career and fought through all the bumps and bruises. He doesn’t play up to his size or his bulk, and he might need some work to learn how use all his skills to become a killer. If someone is patient, he could eventually be someone’s left tackle, but he could be most amazing if he’s used on the right side.
CFN Projection: Second Round

6. Derek Sherrod, Mississippi State 6-6, 321
Very big and very long, he has the prototype size and bulked up to get stronger and look even more like the ideal tackle. He moves well for is size and is good at burying his man when he’s able to lock on, but he’s not a consistent blaster for the ground game He’ll work to be good and he’s smart enough to adjust to the NFL immediately, however, he’s a good all-around prospect, but he doesn’t do any one thing at a high level. He’ll start, but he’ll be a cog and he definitely won’t be an anchor.
CFN Projection: Second Round

7. James Brewer, Indiana 6-6, 323
The size is there and the frame is ideal, but can he stay healthy? Can he push anyone around in the running game? He’s missing the ability to destroy his man and he’s not going to be a killer for a tough ground game, and he’s not consistent enough as a pass protector. He’s quick for his size, but he needs work to harness all his tools to become an NFL left tackle. There’s huge upside considering his size.
CFN Projection: Third Round

8. Chris Hairston, Clemson 6-6, 326
Young, big, and with plenty of potential, he’s still a work in progress and he needs a few years in an NFL weight room before he’s able to show off all he can do. He’s a tough fighter who just might be scratching the surface on his potential, and once he’s a bit more physically mature, the upside could be tremendous. He’s not going to be a plug-and-play blocker, and he might only be a right tackle, but he could be fantastic in two years.
CFN Projection: Fourth Round

9. Lee Ziemba, Auburn 6-6, 317
A huge recruit for Auburn, literally, he became the main man early for a line that eventually paved the way for a national title. He has a great frame with good length, and he’s not afraid to get nasty and fight for every block on every play. Still relatively young, he not only more than held his own, but he’s still maturing into his body type. While he’s not going to be able to handle many NFL speed rushers and he’s a right tackle only, he will eventually be a steady starter. He won’t be special, but he’ll be solid.
CFN Projection: Third Round

10. DeMarcus Love, Arkansas (OG) 6-5, 318
With a great frame and good bulk, he could work as a guard if absolutely needed. He’s always fighting and always looking to bury his man. However, he doesn’t look the type of an NFL guard and he’s not quite athletic enough to be a top tackle. After a rough off-season of workouts, looking overmatched in the Senior Bowl practices, he’s not a great fit for any pro attack. He’ll be a decent part of a line, but he won’t be a great starter to rely on to do much shoving around.
CFN Projection: Fifth Round

- 2011 NFL Offensive Tackle Rankings - No. 11 to 30