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2011 NFL Draft - Ranking The WRs No. 11 to 35
Boise State WR Titus Young
Boise State WR Titus Young
CollegeFootballNews.com
Posted Apr 11, 2011


From a college football perspective, here's the ranking of all the top receiver prospects. ... No. 11 to 35

2011 NFL Draft Position Rankings

Wide Receivers - No. 11-35


By Pete Fiutak

- 2011 NFL Wide Receiver Rankings - Top Ten

11. Titus Young, Boise State 5-11, 174
A very fast, very productive prospect who should be an occasional gamebreaker, he makes big plays, can be used as a kick returner, and will be the type of player a coach invents ways to get the ball to. He’s not exactly built to be a major factor on a regular basis – he’s going to get beaten up by anyone who puts a hand on him - and he’s not going to be facing San Jose State anymore. He’ll be used in a variety of ways and will be asked to come up with at least one big play a game.
 CFN Projection: Second Round

12. Tandon Doss, Indiana 6-2, 200 (Jr.)
A natural, productive receiver who does all the little things right and catches everything that comes his way. While he has decent size and huge hands, he’s not all that fast and he doesn’t get physical. Forget about any blocking and there aren’t enough yards after contact, but he’ll be great in the slot and he’ll bail out his quarterback time and again. He might be overdrafted, and he’s never going to be a No. 1 target, but he’ll be a serviceable performer for several years on the inside.
CFN Projection:
Second Round

13. Terrence Toliver, LSU 6-4, 212
He should’ve been better. A big-time recruit, even for LSU, he was supposed to be the next big thing and a certain star. Bad quarterback play was a problem and there’s a good chance he could blow up as a nice value pick, but he has use his skills better. He has the size and he has the 4.4 speed, and the athleticism and quickness aren’t a question, but he gets blown off his route by a slight breeze and he’s going to make way too many mistakes to be relied on as a sharp, dependable route runner. If he gets the right coaching, and the right mentor, he could be a steal. CFN Projection: Fifth Round

14. Edmund Gates, Abilene Christian 5-11, 192
On the plus side, he’s still scratching the surface. On the negative, he’s going to be 25. The former basketball player has all-world speed and can blow past anyone, but he’s not just going to be a track guy playing football. With a great attitude and high character, he’ll do what’s needed to be better and work on the little things. He is hardly polished, is too old, and isn’t big, but he’s a special athlete and he should be a home run hitter who thrives as a No. 3 deep threat who can exploit single coverage.
CFN Projection:
Fourth Round

15. Niles Paul, Nebraska 6-1, 224
A compact, tough receiver who can play inside or out, and while he’s not all that fast, he has functional speed and he can find ways to get open. Extremely strong, he’ll hit people in the ground game and he has no problem against the more physical defensive backs. While he has some good tools, he’s not a great wide receiver and was never healthy last year. Some will want to compare him to Anquan Boldin, but he doesn’t have the hands and he’s not the type who’ll get open against a defense trying to stop him.
CFN Projection:
Fourth Round

16. Jeremy Kerley, TCU 5-9, 189
A very good, very nice college player who turned into a killer of a home run hitter, the problem is that he’s a smallish player who relies on a speed game, but without the speed. It’s one thing to put a nail in Wyoming’s coffin, but he’s not fast enough make anything big happen on a regular basis in the NFL. He’s quick and can be used as a return man, but he’ll be a disappointing receiver who’ll only be a No. 3.
CFN Projection:
Fourth Round

17. Greg Salas, Hawaii 6-1, 210
Ultra-productive, Salas sucked in everything that came his way in a tremendously productive career. Of course, he played for Hawaii and got more than his share of chances, but with good size, decent speed, and excellent hands, but he doesn’t have great quickness and isn’t explosive in any way. He’s hardly the most complete wide receiver, but he’s going to find a way to fit in any system and he should become a whale of a third down target.
CFN Projection:
Fifth Round

18. Austin Pettis, Boise State 6-2, 209
With good size and great route running ability, he’s a good wide receiver who’s a better football player than an athlete. He’ll catch everything that comes his way and he came up with several nice deep plays over his years at Boise State, but he’s way too slow, isn’t quick, and he doesn’t use his size well enough as a blocker. He’ll be a third receiver who becomes ultra-reliable on short-to-midrange routes, but he’ll be erased by any NFL defensive back who’s trying to stop him. He’ll probably be overdrafted.
CFN Projection:
Fourth Round

19. Cecil Shorts, Mount Union 6-0, 205
For a guy coming from Mount Union, there needs to be some semblance of sizzle. The problem is that he’s not fast, isn’t going to come up with the big plays in the NFL that he did in D-III, and isn’t physical. However, while he’s not going to be dynamic, he could be steady. A great route runner with impeccable character and a great personality, he’ll make up for his issues by doing all the little things right. As long as the expectations are kept low, he should be a decent No. 3 receiver with a little bit of time.
CFN Projection:
Fourth Round

20. Tori Gurley, South Carolina 6-4, 216 (Soph.)
While it might seem like Gurley should’ve stuck around, he’s going to be 24 and Alshon Jeffery is the clear star of the South Carolina passing show. Even though he has a slew of concerns from his lack of pure athleticism and inability to use his size to be physical, he’s very big, catches everything, and moves well enough for his size to get by. While he might not be a special receiver, he has just enough raw skills to get a long, long look. On his hands alone he could find a role as a reliable third down target.
CFN Projection:
Fifth Round

21. Armon Binns, Cincinnati 6-3, 209
With excellent size and great receiving ability, he uses his frame well to push his way into the open and muscle out defensive backs to catch the ball. He’s not fast and he won’t ever get deep, and for his physical play he doesn’t block well enough, but he tries. The character is there and hands are enough to make him a dangerous short-range target, but he’s extremely limited.
CFN Projection:
Sixth Round

22. DeAndre Brown, Southern Miss 6-6, 233 (Jr.)
Very, VERY big and with good route running ability, he’s able to work to get open and he’s physical enough to battle to catch the ball. Like a smallish tight end, he needs a shot from a defensive back to get down. Unfortunately, he has never been the same since an ugly leg injury after originally looking like a sure-thing NFL star, and while he has interesting size and good skills, he’s simply not an NFL athlete anymore. He acts like a first rounder when he’ll have to work his tail off to simply make a team.
CFN Projection:
Sixth Round

23. Ronald Johnson, USC 5-11, 199
He had a good career at USC, but not a great one, and he doesn’t have anything special about his game to make him a must-have part of a passing game. He’s quick, gets open well, and isn’t afraid to get his nose dirty and come up with a big block or two, but he’s not all that big, gets pushed around, and has major problems hanging on to the ball. He’ll probably be overdrafted, and while he’ll make a team, he’ll be nothing more than just another guy.
CFN Projection:
Third Round

24. Aldrick Robinson, SMU 6-0, 184
Fast, fast, fast. With fantastic deep wheels, he can make a team purely on his home-run hitting ability and has the hands to make the big grab whenever needed. Too small and too weak, he’ll get shoved around with a little bit of a push and he’ll never be a part of a running game even though he’ll try to block. With his athleticism, character, and speed, he’ll make a team, but he’ll struggle to find a role in the passing game and might have to shine as a returner.
CFN Projection:
Fifth Round

25. Darvin Adams, Auburn 6-2, 190 (Jr.)
While he was a big-play deep target for Cam Newton last year, and a good pass catcher two years ago setting the Auburn record for grabs, he doesn’t have much NFL speed and he’s too lanky to be physical on the short-to-midrange routes. He’s not going to come up with the home runs he was able to last year, and he’ll drop too many passes to be reliable on key downs. In other words, he has to show one thing he can do really well at an NFL level.
CFN Projection:
Fourth Round

26. Demarco Sampson, San Diego State 6-2, 204
With decent size and just enough speed to get by, he has nice tools and he knows how to use them to get open. A fighter, he catches anything close to him and he’ll battle to come up with the key catch, but he’s not going to do much of anything for the ground game and he’s always banged up. The biggest problem is his age, about to turn 26, and he’ll have a short shelf life. He’ll be just good enough to really, really want to keep around, but not talented enough to spend too much time off the practice squad.
CFN Projection:
Free Agent

27. Jeff Maehl, Oregon 6-1, 190
There’s no NFL talent whatsoever, he too slow in the 40, he’s too thin, and he can’t lift a weight, but he’s a decent athlete who cuts well and has phenomenal hands. Always open – ALWAYS open – and always coming up with the big play needed, everyone will want him for the practice squad. While he’s not big and looks like he should get shoved around, he gets into the second level well and he finds the holes. On the right team he could become a quarterback’s best friend.
CFN Projection:
Free Agent

28. Denarius Moore, Tennessee 6-0, 194
The tools are there, but he’s just not that good a football player. He has decent size and phenomenal speed, he could make a team in a Donte Stallworth sort of way and become a deep threat who makes a few huge plays a year. With his wheels, though, he should play far faster and he doesn’t explode like he should. There’s something missing from his game and he isn’t a good enough football player, but he could be dangerous if he can harness his potential and grow into a better route runner.
CFN Projection:
Sixth Round

29. Jock Sanders, West Virginia 5-6, 181
Really, REALLY small, Sanders will have to make it as a return man or he’ll be a quick and easy cut. Tough to find when he gets behind his blockers, he’s able to get lost and then cut and fly for a big play. Character is a problem, he’s not durable, and he’s way too slow for a player of his size. However, he’s a good enough football player – as opposed to being an athlete – to become an interesting part of an offensive scheme. He’s a weapon who’ll come up with some big plays here and there.
CFN Projection:
Free Agent

30. Ryan Whalen, Stanford 6-1, 202
There’s absolutely nothing about his game that makes him an NFL player, but he catches everything and is great at doing whatever is needed to get his nose dirty. He’s smart, he blocks, and he’ll run any route asked of him. There’s little to no NFL speed and he doesn’t make anything big happen when the ball is in his hands. He could be someone’s slot receiver, but he’ll be an easy cut if he ever drops a ball.
CFN Projection:
Free Agent

31. Dane Sanzenbacher, Ohio State
32. Keith Smith, Purdue
33. Mark Dell, Michigan State
34. Kris Adams, UTEP
35. Lester Jean, Florida Atlantic

- 2011 NFL Wide Receiver Rankings - Top Ten