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2011 NFL Draft - Ranking CBs No. 11 to 25
West Virginia CB Brandon Hogan
West Virginia CB Brandon Hogan
CollegeFootballNews.com
Posted Apr 24, 2011


From a college football perspective, here's the ranking of all the top cornerback prospects. ... No. 11 to 25

2011 NFL Draft Position Rankings

Cornerbacks - No. 11-25


By Pete Fiutak

- 2011 NFL Cornerback Rankings - Top Ten

11. Rashad Carmichael, Virginia Tech 5-10, 192
While he plays fast and he’s known for being a speed corner, he didn’t time well at the Combine with a slowish 4.51. Very quick, he managed to make up for his mistakes with his athleticism coming up with ten picks over the last two seasons. While he’s not all that big, he’s tough against the run is more than happy to get physical against the bigger receivers. However, he’s not a great tackler and can’t move over to safety. Coachable, he’ll do whatever is needed to help the team, including on special teams, and he should eventually be a strong nickel or dime defender.
CFN Projection: Fourth Round

12. Brandon Hogan, West Virginia 5-10, 192
Very fast and with the raw wheels to hang around with any target, he has the athleticism and he has the strength, coming up with 19 reps on the bench. He cuts on a dime and has the right attitude of a No. 1 corner. He’s always up for a challenge and is great at battling with the top targets. Now he has to learn how to use all his talents to be a better all-around player. Forget about stopping the run and he doesn’t use his strength like he should against the stronger targets. While he doesn’t have to serve any jail time after a DUI, there are still major question marks about his character. He could turn out to be a fantastic steal as long as he’s used the right way and as long as he has the right coaching to maximize his talents.
CFN Projection: Fourth Round

13. Johnny Patrick, Louisville 5-11, 191
A strong senior season turned him into a good prospect, but he has to show that last year wasn’t a fluke. With good size and nice quickness, he has the look and he has the burst, but he’s not fast and he’s not fluid. The 4.55 at the Combine was bad, a knee injury kept him from being doing much on the quickness drills, and the 13 reps on the bench were disappointing considering there are some who might think of him as a possible safety. However, he’s physical and he’s not afraid to come up with help against the run. Not known as a high-character team guy, he’ll have to have a fire lit under him and he’ll have to prove he’s tough enough to be a consistent No. 2 corner. He’s a good football player, but he has to maximize his potential.
CFN Projection: Third Round

14. Kendric Burney, North Carolina 5-9, 186
SLOWWWWWWW. He’s quick on the field and he plays fast, but his 4.72 at the Combine was a disaster. A better football player than an athlete, he’s not big enough, he didn’t show much in the vertical and the long jump, and he doesn’t have the look of a top-shelf corner. His game film is great and he’s great at battling with the better receivers, but he was abused by Miami’s Leonard Hankerson at the Senior Bowl. He’ll never be a No. 1 corner, but he’s a strong enough talent, despite the lack of skills, to be a regular somewhere in the secondary. He won’t be able to hang with anyone with speed, but he could be fantastic as a nickel or dime defender.
CFN Projection: Fourth Round

15. Chris Rucker, Michigan State 6-1, 195
He always acted like a No. 1 corner and relished a challenge, but he didn’t always produce. He’s one of the bigger corners in the draft and he’s fast for his size, but he didn’t run at the Combine and he came up with a pathetic ten reps on the bench. Even so, he’s physical and he’s a terrific tackler who’s always willing to try to beat up the bigger receivers. For good or bad, his future is as a safety if he can get stronger, but he lacks the raw speed and he gives up too many big plays to be a regular producer on the outside. Character is an issue on and off the field, and he thinks he’s better than he is, but there’s enough there to think he could develop into a decent part of a rotation.
CFN Projection: Fifth Round

16. Shareece Wright, USC 5-11, 185
Can he hold up? Fast, he came up with a 4.46 at the Combine and he was solid during the drills, but he’s only a few years removed from a broken neck and he missed almost all of 2009 with academic issues. A one-year wonder, he came up with a strong senior year with 73 tackles, but he never lived up to the hype coming out of high school. He has the raw tools to be fantastic with a little bit of time, but he’s a better athlete than a football player. He needs a ton of technique work and has to show he can make things happen with the ball is in the air, but with his speed and his motor he should be a nice backup who sees time in nickel situations.
CFN Projection: Third Round

17. Buster Skrine, UT Chattanooga 5-9, 186
While he wasn’t the fastest player at the Combine, he looked the part with a 4.43 and has been times around 4.3. Smooth and athletic, he also has the strength to go along with the speed coming up with 20 reps on the bench. Not all that big and not a strong tackler, he’s not going to do much in run support and he’s going to get shoved around. Extremely raw, he’ll need at least a year of hardcore NFL coaching to improve his technique. With his wheels and his athleticism, there’s a ton of upside and he’s just scratching the surface, but he’ll most likely make his biggest impact as a returner early on.
CFN Projection: Fourth Round

18. Jalil Brown, Colorado 6-1, 204
While he’s not a blazer and he’s not ever going to be able to hang with the receivers with dangerous deep speed, he came up with 24 reps on the bench at the Combine and showed just enough talent to potentially move to safety. Not quite as physical as he needs to be, he’s not a rock-solid tackler and he gets pushed around way too much for a player of his size. Even with his issues, he makes lots of plays and he brings a great attitude. Willing to do whatever a coaching staff wants, he’ll be a special teamer, a nickel defender, or anything needed to help out the team. He’s not going to be a regular starter, but he should be a good producer in the right role.
CFN Projection: Fourth Round

19. Curtis Marsh, Utah State 6-0, 192
The former running back was timed in the 4.5s, but he stepped it up in Indy with a 4.46 to go along with his silky-smooth agility. He still needs work on figuring out the subtle nuances of the position, but he did enough to be known as a ball-hawk to stay away from. While it’ll take a little while before he harnesses all his skills, he’s such a talented, explosive athlete that he’s worth the effort. More than fine in nickel and dime packages early on, he’ll end up being a good all-around corner once he puts it all together. The upside is limitless.
CFN Projection: Fourth Round

20. Chris Culliver, South Carolina (FS) 6-0, 199
Speed, speed, speed, speed, speed. In a draft class full of decent runners, Culliver takes it to another level timing in the sub-4.4s while flying through the ball drills at the Combine. He’s built well and has the strength and leaping ability to make scouts drool, he has to prove he can put it all together on the field. Talent-wise, he’s not really an NFL corner and he’s not really a safety with mediocre tackling skills and poor ball instincts. Always banged up, he’ll be a regular in the training room. Someone will be fired up to have him and he’ll impress in practices by flying all over the field, but he’ll be disappointing when the lights go on.
CFN Projection: Fourth Round

21. Josh Thomas, Buffalo 5-10, 191
Very fast and extremely explosive, Thomas ran a good 4.46 at the Combine and came up with a terrific 38 ½” vertical. He cuts well, moved fluidly, and is great at closing on a receiver in a heartbeat. Experienced, he started for four years and turned out to be a solid run stopper in the open field. He struggled a bit too much against mediocre competition and he only made two career picks, but he’s tough, fights to make plays, and has the raw tools needed to be a starter. While he doesn’t do anything at a high level, he’s a good enough all-around football player to be a regular in a rotation.
CFN Projection: Fourth Round

22. Marcus Gilchrist, Clemson (FS) 5-10, 195
A high-riser after a strong Combine, he can be used as a safety or a corner. Versatile is more of the right term for him than a tweener, but he doesn’t quite have the raw wheels to be a starting cover-corner and he doesn’t have the size to be a thumper of a safety. With 26 reps on the bench and 173 tackles over the last two seasons, he’s strong and productive, and he’s always going full-tilt with a great motor. Willing to do whatever it takes, he’s extremely coachable and he’s always bringing the A effort. Now someone has to figure out where he can play.
CFN Projection: Fourth Round

23. Devon Torrence, Ohio State 6-0, 199
He’s too slow. The 4.63 he came up with at the Combine was actually a plus for him, having been timed at times in the 4.7s. With good size and nice hitting skills, he’s a physical defender who plays faster than the stopwatch, but he’s not the most instinctive defender and is out of position way too much. Not smooth, he’ll have a tough time with the quicker receivers and doesn’t have the upside to think he can be much more than a decent backup. While he has decent skills, he needs too much work to put that much of a time and coaching investment.
CFN Projection: Free Agent

24. Chykie Brown, Texas 5-11, 190
Very quick and very smooth, he doesn’t look the part on film but is a terrific athlete with good size and upside. More of a workout warrior than a top-shelf football player, he’ll need time and coaching to harness his skills and talents. He didn’t do nearly enough on the field with little happening when the ball was in the air – he picked off just two passes in 47 career games – and providing little to no consistent help against the run. He’ll tackle, but he’s just not that great at it. Experienced, he has seen it all at a high Big 12 level, but he’s missing the pure football player streak that most top Texas defensive backs possess. Even so, with his tools the potential is there to be a far better pro than a collegian.
CFN Projection: Fifth Round

25. DeMarcus Van Dyke, Miami 6-1, 176
You can’t coach speed. He’s way undersized with a Snoop Dogg body that needs more bulk, but he clocked a 4.29 and plays just as fast and smooth on the field. He’s never going to tackle anyone and he’ll get shoved around by anyone who gets a hand on him, but the biggest problem is his playing ability. He couldn’t stay on the field in college, relegated to backup duty way too often, and he’s more of an athlete than a football player. But that speed … it might not make up for the five reps on the bench, and he’ll never be a regular starter, but coaches love players who can move at an elite level. Someone will find a spot for him.
CFN Projection: Fifth Round

- 2011 NFL Cornerback Rankings - Top Ten