Fiu, Cirminiello, Mitchell on TV - Campus Insiders | Buy College Football Tickets

2011 NFL Draft - 2nd Round Talents
Nevada QB Colin Kaepernick
Nevada QB Colin Kaepernick
CollegeFootballNews.com
Posted Apr 25, 2011


From the college football perspective, here's CFN's 2011 pre-draft ranking of the players with second round talent.

2011 NFL Draft Position Rankings

Second Round Talents


By Pete Fiutak

2011 CFN Talent Rankings
- 1st Rounders
- 2nd Rounders
- 3rd Rounders
- 4th Rounders
- 5th Rounders
- 6th Rounders
- 7th Rounders 
- Top Free Agent Talents 

2011 NFL Prospect Rankings & Breakdowns
- QBs | RBs | FBs | WRs
- TEs | OTs | OGs | Cs 
- OLBs | ILBs | DTs | DEs
- CBs | Ss

- CFN 2010 NFL Draft Team Rankings

2011 NFL Draft Top Prospects
- Offensive | Defense 

2010 NFL Draft Analysis

1st Round (1-16)
1st Round (17-32)
2nd Round
3rd Round
4th Round
5th Round
6th Round
7th Round
Top Free Agents

2010 CFN Talent Rankings

- 1st Rounders
- 2nd Rounders
- 3rd Rounders
- 4th Rounders
- 5th Rounders
- 6th Rounders
- 7th Rounders 
- Top Free Agent Talents 

2010 CFN Position Rankings & Analysis

- QBs | RBs | WRs | TEs
- Cs | OTs | OGs | DEs
- DTs | ILBs | OLBs
- Ss | CBs 

33. QB Colin Kaepernick, Nevada 6-4, 233
If someone is willing to make the investment, and if someone is willing to be very, very patient, Kaepernick has the tools to be a special player. One of the greatest running quarterbacks in college football history, he ran for 4,112 yards and 59 scores, but he’s not just an ultra-mobile prospect throwing for 10,098 career yards and 82 touchdowns. He’s a big, strong player with a phenomenal arm -possibly the best in the draft - and there’s no questioning his ability to make things happen on the move. A phenomenal leader and a film rat, he’ll work to make himself better and he’s the type of player you want as the main man for your franchise. However, he doesn’t seem to make the same throw twice and he needs to work on his delivery. While he got better as a passer, he’s hardly polished and he needs to be more accurate and he has to show a better touch. Again, he’s a project and a prospect, so the hope is for a payoff in three years … and it could be big.
CFN Projection: Third Round

34. OLB Justin Houston, Georgia 6-3, 270
With excellent size and a great burst off the ball, he has the athleticism to work as an outside linebacker or could move to end if needed and be used as a 3-4 pure pass rusher. When he’s on and when he has the fire lit under him, he can dominate and take over a game. With phenomenal athleticism to go along with his bulk and size, he has peerless raw tools, but he has to use them on a more consistent basis. He disappeared way too often and wasn’t nearly as good as his final numbers. He’s the epitome of the pass rusher who comes up with one or two great plays a game and looks good on paper, but doesn’t play up to the stats. If he wants it and if he decides he wants to be great, he could be a destructive force, but he has to be more physical and has to take his game to another level. There’s a chance he could be a far better and bigger pro than he was a collegian.
CFN Projection: Second Round

35. QB Jake Locker, Washington 6-2, 231
He doesn’t have prototype height and he doesn’t have big hands, but that’s about it as far as the physical knocks. An elite athlete for an NFL quarterback, he runs extremely well, has a live arm, and he’s tough as nails. A peerless leader and a pure baller, he’s a fantastic guy with the type of attitude and intangibles that makes him easy to root for. There’s one problem … he can’t throw. Everything looks right, even though he seems like he’s about to run too much when he should be setting his feet to fire, but the mechanics aren’t all that bad. You can’t teach accuracy, and in a world where two of the most accurate quarterbacks in NFL history, Aaron Rodgers and Drew Brees, are the standard-bearers for Super Bowl winners, Locker has a hard ceiling on how far he can likely take a team. If he’s asked to go out there and just play, he should be fine. If he’s asked to be Tom Brady and a pro style passer, it’s not going to happen.
CFN Projection: Second Round

36. WR Torrey Smith, Maryland 6-0, 205 (Jr.)
Fast, fast, fast. As a receiver and a kick returner, Smith has special home-run hitting ability that’s even better than his 4.4 timed speed. With great character and good work ethic forged from a gripping personal story – he all but raised six brothers and sisters by himself – he’s the type of feel-good story that makes him easy to root for. While he might not be a No. 1 target to revolve a passing game around, he’s a tremendous home run hitter who could dominate as a No. 2 and be a dream No. 3 who’ll stretch the field and should star as a returner.
CFN Projection:
Second Round

37. OG Rodney Hudson, Florida State, (C) 6-2, 299
An ultra-productive, barrel-chested blocker who isn’t all that big and doesn’t look like a dominant NFL interior lineman, but he’s extremely athletic with great character and the smarts to be a quarterback up front as a center or work at either guard spot. He doesn’t make mistakes, is always hustling, and he never takes a play off. While he has the perfect temperament and make-up for an offensive lineman, he simply doesn’t have the right body to be a top pick. He’ll have to work to be around 300 pounds and would be much more natural at around 280, and he won’t fit every line, but he’s a great talent who’s too good to ignore just because he’s not 6-5 and 325.
CFN Projection: Third Round

38. QB Ryan Mallett, Arkansas 6-7, 247 (Jr.)
If you could promise that he’ll get a three-Mississippi count, he’ll destroy NFL defenses. There’s no one in the draft who’ll be better with time and a clean pocket, with the arm to put a pass anywhere on the field and the ability to use the howitzer to put a deep ball on a line and stretch a defense. The issue is whenever there’s a slight bit of pressure. He locks on to one target way too often, and if there’s so much as a stiff breeze coming his way, it’s a toss-up whether or not he’ll make the throw or put it in the fifth row. There’s no mobility whatsoever and there’ll be times when his NFL offense will be shut down cold if the line isn’t doing its job. And then there’s the character factor. Forget about the rumors swirling, the big issue is a confidence level that’s occasionally a plus, but more often than not appears to rub people the wrong way. However, even with all the concerns and all the question marks, if he gets to play behind a top line, and if he learns how to get the ball out of his hands faster, the upside is there to be fantastic.
CFN Projection: Second Round

39. CB Brandon Harris, Miami 5-9, 191 (Jr.)
Unlike the other top corner prospects in the draft, Harris is lacking the bulk to go along with the speed. He plays fast and looks the part on film, but his 4.44 is just good enough to get by, and he came up with a 4.51 in some dashes. Nice against the run and with the look of a No. 1 cover-corner, he does a little bit of everything well, and he’s more talented than advertised with a great attitude and the want-to to be special. Already good, he’ll be even better once he gets NFL-level coaching. The overall skills might not be there compared to Patrick Peterson and the other star corners, but he’s a bust-proof starter who will take away one side of the field.
CFN Projection: First Round

40. OG Orlando Franklin, Miami (OT) 6-6, 315
With the versatility to play tackle as well as guard, he can play just about any position. While he’s not quite athletic enough to be a stud on the outside, he’s a tall, tough option for the interior where he can best use his run blocking skills. Tough as nails, he’s always going to fight through the little problems, but a coaching staff is going to have to deal with a bit of an attitude. If he can be coached up, and if he can work on being a star, he could be one of the most complete interior blockers in the draft. However, he has to want to be coached.
CFN Projection: Second Round

41. OLB Quan Sturdivant, North Carolina 6-1, 241 (OLB)
A short, squatty hitter who doesn’t necessarily have the right body or the right look, but he has great instincts, is smart, tough, and is always around the ball. Not quite ideal to be used as a playmaker in the backfield from the outside, he’s not going to be a pass rusher, but he knows what he’s doing and always finds ways to get around the ball. He’s not going to be the best linebacker in a corps, but he could be the leader everyone works around. No, he wasn’t part of the Tar Heels who got in trouble with the NCAA, but he did miss the opener against LSU before getting cleared to get back on the field,
CFN Projection: Third Round

42. CB Aaron Williams, Texas (FS) 6-0, 204 (Jr.)
Is he the next great Texas defensive back? Probably, but the bigger question will be where he plays. Part safety and part corner, he’s a tweener in a good way and has the versatility to sit in someone’s secondary for a long time and be extremely productive. With his size and skills he can beat up receivers, but he’s not fast enough to be a No. 1 lockdown coverman and might have to work in a Malcolm Jenkins-like role as a star as a part of a system. Running a 4.52 at the Combine, his future is at free safety where he could be a league-leader in interceptions, but he’ll likely start out at corner where he should be terrific for a few years. A great all-around defensive back, the only thing missing is that raw speed. He’s athletic, can jump out of the stadium, and can be very good as long as he doesn’t have to be the main man.
CFN Projection: Second Round

43. WR Jonathan Baldwin, Pitt 6-4, 228
A receiver who’s built like a tight end, he has the look and the bulk to be an Andre Johnson-type size-wise, and he’s physical enough to use his size well. However, he’s not nearly as fast as a top-shelf target needs to be, isn’t all that quick, and has a knucklehead streak that’ll turn off some, but he’s a great athlete, can jump out of the stadium, and has enough pure football talent to be a potential superstar. One of the toughest calls in the draft, he could be a Pro Bowl talent if he wants it and if he turns into a workout warrior who takes to coaching. If he doesn’t bring the effort, which is a legitimate concern, he could be maddeningly inconsistent.
CFN Projection:
Second Round

44. RB Ryan Williams, Virginia Tech 5-10, 212
Extremely quick and with a pop to his finishes, he flies through the hole and doesn’t get brought down with a simple arm tackle. Give him a sliver of daylight and he’ll fly through it. With a passion for the game, he wants to succeed and he wants to be The Guy who takes over the offense and makes it his. The problem is his durability. He was a one-year wonder and couldn’t get over an ankle injury that kept him down most of the season, but if he’s asked to be a part of a rotation, even if he’s the No. 1 guy, he’ll be phenomenal.
CFN Projection: Second Round

45. CB Jimmy Smith, Colorado 6-2, 211
Very big, very athletic, and very fast, Smith has the tools that scouts dream about. He measured even bigger than expected at the Combine, flashed a 4.44 in the 40, and threw up 24 reps on the bench. While his future is as a safety with his size and range, he’s going to be a corner right away thanks to his measureables. Smooth as a three-day beard with the working definition of tight hips, he doesn’t cut well and doesn’t look quite as fluid as you’d like for a corner. While he’ll be great against the bigger, fast receivers, he’ll have problems against the jitterbug-quick targets he can’t get his hands on. Again, his future is brightest as a free safety, but he should be solid right away no matter where he plays if, and it’s a big if, he keep his attitude in check and can absorb an NFL playbook. He’s not exactly in the running for the Rhodes Scholarship.
CFN Projection: Second Round

46. OLB Dontay Moch, Nevada 6-1, 248
He might not be all that big and he can’t be a defensive end, but he’s a peerless athlete. Von Miller might have a good burst and Bruce Carter, when healthy, might be as fluid as they come, but no one in this draft moves like Moch, who blew up a 42-inch vertical leap and ripped off a 4.46 at the Combine; he uses the wheels well as a tremendous closer on the quarterback. He’s a willing run stopper who’ll try to hold up against the run, but his money will be made as a playmaker into the backfield. Now he needs to be more creative and has to figure out how to hone his craft after spending his career destroying WAC opponents by simply being faster and more athletic. Get a good block on him and he’ll stay hit, but he’ll spend most of his time flying around blockers.
CFN Projection: Third Round

47. DE Jabaal Sheard, Pitt 6-3, 264
Extremely quick off the ball and the type of player who can get into the backfield in a blink, he’s the type of pure pass rusher the draft seems to be missing. While he’s not going to be a rock against the run and he won’t see time in a 3-4, he has all the moves and all the athleticism to be a sack artist. Can he stay healthy? He always had a nagging bump or bruise of some sort, and there’s no room or ability to get any bigger, but he could be a great specialist who changes games on third downs.
CFN Projection: Second Round

48. TE Kyle Rudolph, Notre Dame 6-6, 259 (Jr.)
Has all the tools to be a terrific all-around NFL tight end with great size and excellent speed. A good blocker who isn’t afraid to get dirty for the ground game, he’s not just a big wide receiver. The problem is his durability with a hamstring injury a few years ago before missing most of last year injured. While he might not last a full season and he’ll always be dinged, he’s the most complete tight end in the draft and will be counted on to be a big part of the passing game right away.
CFN Projection: Second Round

49. FS Rahim Moore, UCLA 6-0, 202 (Jr.)
Not quite fast enough to be a corner, he still has the skills to hang with most receivers on the outside if needed and he’s talented enough to fly around at free safety making plays. He’s always around the ball and he has a knack to pick off passes with ten interceptions as a sophomore. Very quick and with a great burst, he closes on the ball in a hurry and plays faster than his timed speed. Not a big hitter though he has the body-type to unload, he’s not going to be the surest of tacklers and he’ll make his biggest impact against the better passing teams. While he’s not soft, he’s not known for being all that physical and he whiffs way too often in the open field. Even with all his issues, he’s athletic enough to be the type of player who comes up with big stats with a few big plays a game, but doesn’t do the little things right on a consistent basis.
CFN Projection: Second Round

50. RB Demarco Murray, Oklahoma 6-0, 214
Fast, fast, fast, Murray has one of the best blends of strength and speed in the draft, but he had a vast array of big injuries during his career. With his basic skills, great hands for the passing game, and with return skills, he can be used in a variety of ways and can be a jack-of-all-trades. While he doesn’t look like a running back and is built like a tall, tough receiver, he could be a devastating playmaker with ten good touches a game. With his injury history, he can’t be relied on to last a full season.
CFN Projection: Third Round

51. SS DeAndre McDaniel, Clemson (SS) 6-0, 217
Big and strong, he’s an intimidating force who looks the part and knows how to use his lumber to beat up receivers. He’s like another linebacker on the field, but he moves better with good cutting ability and all-around athleticism. He’s the type of run stopper who can hold up in a brawl, and he’ll also make plays in the open field. However, he missed on a few too many easy plays and bounces off ball-carriers a bit too often. For his size and toughness he gets buried way too easily and he’ll have to learn how to fight through the trash. There are concerns from a past assault and battery charge, but that was a few years ago.
CFN Projection: Fourth Round

52. WR Greg Little, North Carolina 6-2, 231
A high school superstar who could’ve gone anywhere and was a major coup for North Carolina, Little is a tremendous athlete, freakishly strong, and great at using his size to beat people up as a blocker. Smooth as glass, even though he doesn’t look like it body-wise, he runs well, isn’t afraid to take a shot across the middle in the name of another yard, and has all the skills to be a great slot receiver. He’s not all that tall, isn’t a blazer, and has an attitude for good and bad, but it’s all there to be a very productive, very good player for a long time.
CFN Projection:
Second Round

53. TE Lance Kendricks, Wisconsin 6-3, 243
A terrific receiver with great hands, he isn’t afraid to go across the middle and he’s able to go after the ball and fight for the catch around the goal line. He didn’t run all that well in workouts, but he’s fluid on the field and has no problems blowing past linebackers. Considering he went to Wisconsin, he’s an average blocker and he isn’t all that big to be used for a power running game, but he has the talent to be the best of the recent crop of good Badger tight end prospects.
CFN Projection: Second Round

54. RB Daniel Thomas, Kansas State 6-0, 230
Very big, very tough, and very thick, Thomas has the body and the bulk to be a full-time workhorse runner. Even though he was the only thing anyone had to worry about on the Kansas State offense, he still produced at a high level week in and week out. While he wasn’t needed for the passing game – or wasn’t used – he can catch the ball. He’s not a speedster and he’s not necessarily a powerful between-the-tackles runner, but there’s little downside. He might not be a special NFL back, but he can certainly be very, very good as long as someone doesn’t think he’s a battering ram.
CFN Projection: Second Round

55. OG Marcus Cannon, TCU (OT) 6-5, 358
Extremely productive at a high level for a long time, Cannon was a terrific all-star at tackle and was the key part of some offensive machines. He might be 358 pounds, but he moves like a much smaller player and he carries the weight shockingly well. While he might not be for everyone body-wise, and he doesn’t use his girth to bury defenders on a regular basis, but his shocking combination of talents is enough to expect a long, solid career.
CFN Projection: Second Round

56. WR Randall Cobb, Kentucky 5-11, 191 (Jr.)
A jack-of-all-trades playmaker who carried the Kentucky offense at times as a Wildcat quarterback, return man, runner, and receiver. He’s not all that big, but he’s tough, very fast, and extremely quick. A playmaker whenever he gets the ball in his hands, he can play anywhere in a receiving corps. He puts the ball on the ground way too often and he’s not going to block anyone, but he’ll be a nice toy to play with and he should be a very, very nice weapon if he doesn’t have to be the main man.
CFN Projection:
Third Round

57. RB Shane Vereen, California 5-10, 210
Speed. He might not be the fastest back in the draft, but he moves quickly and decisively. If he gets a little room to move, bu-bye. While he’s not huge, he’s not afraid to use a little power from time to time and he was lineman-strong on the bench at the Combine. However, he doesn’t always run to his strengths, or more accurately, to his speed, and he isn’t going to produce on a consistent basis. While he’s not going to be anyone’s all-star, in today’s day and age, he’ll be perfect in part of a rotation.
CFN Projection: Third Round

58. OLB Greg Jones, Michigan State 6-0, 242
Phenomenally productive, Jones was a four-year star for the Spartans making 465 tackles as the peerless leader of the defense. While he was a slight disappointment last year considering all the high expectations, he was the best linebacker in college football in 2009 doing a little bit of everything as a pass rusher and a run stopper. He’s not all that tall, but he’s a compact rock who comes up with every tackle he gets to. With the makeup and the smarts, he has the ability to sit in the middle of someone’s linebacking corps, but he’s quick enough to work on the weakside on in a 3-4 inside spot if needed. He’s not going to blow anyone up and he could stand to add another ten pounds of good weight, but he can’t really add it without losing something. He’s a better football player than his tools.
CFN Projection: Third Round

59. OG Clint Boling, Georgia (OT) 6-5, 308
While he’s not a massive blocker and he’s not going to get much bigger, he’s a nice, tough run blocker who always works and has the skills to work inside or out. He moves well, can get on the move and make things happen down the field, and he’s functional enough to battle in a phone booth against the weaker defensive tackles. He’s not going to beat anyone up and he’s not going to handle NFL speed rushers if he moves to tackle, but he’s a good, sound player who’ll have added value because of his versatility.
CFN Projection: Second Round

60. WR Jerrel Jernigan, Troy 5-9, 185
Extremely quick with excellent speed, he’s a shifty, dangerous playmaker who dominated the Sun Belt and came up big whenever he got his chances against the bigger boys. Great when he gets the ball on the move, he should thrive in single coverage and will have extra value as a kick returner. The problem is a lack of size that should get him beaten up a bit too much. He wasn’t healthy as a collegian and certainly won’t be able to take much of a pounding at the next level. There will be times when he takes over a game and is the difference, but he won’t be reliable to last 16 games.
CFN Projection:
Third Round

61. WR Leonard Hankerson, Miami 6-1, 209
With good size and excellent speed, he’s a nice all-around prospect who had a good career and then abused defensive backs during Senior Bowl week to make a bigger splash. He likes being a football player and is always working and always trying to improve his game; it shows as a route runner. A more natural receiver than he gets credit for – he did have a case of the dropsies at times - he can snatch the ball with big hands. He doesn’t have special skills and he’s not the type of target to revolve a passing game around, but he’ll be a long-time pro who’ll be a reliable complementary player.
CFN Projection:
Third Round

62. OG James Carpenter, Alabama (OT) 6-4, 321
A top blocker at the highest of levels, he has nice size, good athleticism, and the versatility to play anywhere on an NFL line except center. With a fantastic Senior Bowl week, he showed more talent and more skills than many scouts thought, and his stock went up in a big hurry. While he’s athletic enough to work at tackle, he’s a far better option as a light-footed guard. He’s not going to destroy anyone in the running game, but he’s more than good enough to get by and he’ll be drafted much higher than most with his skills because of his versatility.
CFN Projection: Third Round

63. ILB Kelvin Sheppard, LSU 6-2, 250
Built for the inside, he’s not all that athletic and doesn’t move like an elite player, but he’s strong, thick, and rock-solid as a run stopper. A pure tackler who succeeded at a high level in the SEC, he did a little of everything well and was moved around where needed. There’s no worries about the bumps and bruises; he’s a smart, high-energy warrior who has to be dragged off the field. While he’s not going to be the best player in a linebacking corps, and he might not be on the field on third downs, he could be a leading tackler. He’s the type of player you’d like to work a run defense around.
CFN Projection: Third Round

64. OG Danny Watkins, Baylor (OT), 6-4, 310
Ollllllllllld. He’s one of the most versatile linemen in the draft, he’s insanely strong, and he has an ultra-nasty mean streak and work ethic that every coach dreams of. If he was turning 22, he might be a top 50 overall pick – and he still might be – but about to turn 27, he has about five years of shelf life and will lose several draft slots because of it. The problem, also, is that he’s not a finished product and needs a year of NFL coaching, but because of his age and because of where he’ll be drafted, or overdrafted, he might get stuck inside and let him start hitting someone right away.
CFN Projection: Second Round