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2011 NFL Draft - 4th Round Talents
Iowa SS Tyler Sash
Iowa SS Tyler Sash
CollegeFootballNews.com
Posted Apr 25, 2011


From the college football perspective, here's CFN's 2011 pre-draft ranking of the players with fourth round talent.

2011 NFL Draft Position Rankings

Fourth Round Talents


By Pete Fiutak

2011 CFN Talent Rankings
- 1st Rounders
- 2nd Rounders
- 3rd Rounders
- 4th Rounders
- 5th Rounders
- 6th Rounders
- 7th Rounders 
- Top Free Agent Talents 

2011 NFL Prospect Rankings & Breakdowns
- QBs | RBs | FBs | WRs
- TEs | OTs | OGs | Cs 
- OLBs | ILBs | DTs | DEs
- CBs | Ss

- CFN 2010 NFL Draft Team Rankings

2011 NFL Draft Top Prospects
- Offensive | Defense 

2010 NFL Draft Analysis

1st Round (1-16)
1st Round (17-32)
2nd Round
3rd Round
4th Round
5th Round
6th Round
7th Round
Top Free Agents

2010 CFN Talent Rankings

- 1st Rounders
- 2nd Rounders
- 3rd Rounders
- 4th Rounders
- 5th Rounders
- 6th Rounders
- 7th Rounders 
- Top Free Agent Talents 

2010 CFN Position Rankings & Analysis

- QBs | RBs | WRs | TEs
- Cs | OTs | OGs | DEs
- DTs | ILBs | OLBs
- Ss | CBs 

98. WR Titus Young, Boise State 5-11, 174
A very fast, very productive prospect who should be an occasional gamebreaker, he makes big plays, can be used as a kick returner, and will be the type of player a coach invents ways to get the ball to. He’s not exactly built to be a major factor on a regular basis – he’s going to get beaten up by anyone who puts a hand on him - and he’s not going to be facing San Jose State anymore. He’ll be used in a variety of ways and will be asked to come up with at least one big play a game.
CFN Projection:
Second Round

99. OG John Moffitt, Wisconsin 6-4, 319
Really, really strong, he’ll have no problems pushing anyone around in a power running game. He’s big, tough, and he’s shockingly quick for his size. However, he doesn’t use his athleticism well enough and is far better in a phone booth. He’s a great leader and a good character player, but he doesn’t quite have the elite skills to be a top NFL starter. He’ll be a starter, but he’s not going to be the type of blocker who’ll get anyone fired up.
CFN Projection: Fifth Round

100. CB Davon House, New Mexico State 6-0, 200
The 4.46 wasn’t bad at the Combine and was extremely quick, but he was awful in the ball drills and couldn’t hang on to the ball in any way. However, he made 11 career picks with 37 broken up passes and has decent ball skills, but he was the most talented fish in the WAC pond and dominated against weaker competition. He has the size and he’s athletic enough to be part of a veteran secondary, but he’s missing the elite skills to be anything more than a decent starter. Not all that strong and not a big hitter, he can’t be moved to safety, but everything else is in place to be productive.
CFN Projection: Third Round

101. WR Tandon Doss, Indiana 6-2, 200 (Jr.)
A natural, productive receiver who does all the little things right and catches everything that comes his way. While he has decent size and huge hands, he’s not all that fast and he doesn’t get physical. Forget about any blocking and there aren’t enough yards after contact, but he’ll be great in the slot and he’ll bail out his quarterback time and again. He might be overdrafted, and he’s never going to be a No. 1 target, but he’ll be a serviceable performer for several years on the inside. CFN Projection: Second Round

102. OLB K.J. Wright, Mississippi State 6-3, 246
With great size and good tackling ability, he’s very smart and he works his tail off to make things happen. Unlike most of the outside linebackers in this draft, he’s decent in pass coverage and is better at staying with receivers than his raw tools might suggest. He’s not an athlete, he’s not a huge hitter, and he’s not all that fast, but even though there’s a hard ceiling on what he can do he can and can be a good, solid run stopper on his drive and his motor. An inside linebacker working on the outside, he’s a strongside linebacker only. He won’t be special, but he should be a decent starter.
CFN Projection: Fourth Round

103. SS Tyler Sash, Iowa 6-0, 211 (Jr.)
A huge hitter and a flat-out baller, he hits like a ton of bricks and brings a big-time attitude on every play. He loves to hit, loves to go after the big play, and he doesn’t miss a stop popping like another linebacker. Now he has to hit the weight room to get strong enough to match his type of game. The 11 reps on the bench at the Combine were horrible, and he lacks the overall athleticism to make up for his problems. With his style, he could have a very, very short shelf life as a pro and could be a regular on the IR. He’ll be a fan favorite for a while, but eventually he’ll have problems against the pass and will give up way too many big plays. He’ll get picked on, but he’ll come up with enough highlight reel hits to be a regular.
CFN Projection: Fourth Round

104. WR Terrence Toliver, LSU 6-4, 212
He should’ve been better. A big-time recruit, even for LSU, he was supposed to be the next big thing and a certain star. Bad quarterback play was a problem and there’s a good chance he could blow up as a nice value pick, but he has use his skills better. He has the size and he has the 4.4 speed, and the athleticism and quickness aren’t a question, but he gets blown off his route by a slight breeze and he’s going to make way too many mistakes to be relied on as a sharp, dependable route runner. If he gets the right coaching, and the right mentor, he could be a steal. CFN Projection: Fifth Round

105. OT Chris Hairston, Clemson 6-6, 326
Young, big, and with plenty of potential, he’s still a work in progress and he needs a few years in an NFL weight room before he’s able to show off all he can do. He’s a tough fighter who just might be scratching the surface on his potential, and once he’s a bit more physically mature, the upside could be tremendous. He’s not going to be a plug-and-play blocker, and he might only be a right tackle, but he could be fantastic in two years.
CFN Projection: Fourth Round

106. OT Lee Ziemba, Auburn 6-6, 317
A huge recruit for Auburn, literally, he became the main man early for a line that eventually paved the way for a national title. He has a great frame with good length, and he’s not afraid to get nasty and fight for every block on every play. Still relatively young, he not only more than held his own, but he’s still maturing into his body type. While he’s not going to be able to handle many NFL speed rushers and he’s a right tackle only, he will eventually be a steady starter. He won’t be special, but he’ll be solid.
CFN Projection: Third Round

107. FS Ahmad Black, Florida 5-10, 184
While he has the football talent to play anywhere in a secondary, he doesn’t have the speed to be a corner, where he might be tried out at times, and he doesn’t have the thump to be a strong safety. Very quick, he can turn on a dime and go, but he doesn’t have the raw wheels to hang with an NFL receiver on a regular basis. Even so, he always seemed to be in the right place and he had the instincts to make a ton of big plays. He’s not going to be a top-shelf starter, but he could be a statistical star as a top nickel defender and a piece of a puzzle. He doesn’t have the size, the speed, or the raw measurables, but he has upside.
CFN Projection: Fourth Round

108. TE Charles Clay, Tulsa 6-3, 245 (FB)
Is he a tight end or a fullback or an H-back or all of the above? He’s not fast, with his 4.73 40 time at the Combine not helping the cause, and he doesn’t have the raw size or the blocking skills to be a blocking back for a running game, but he’s a tremendous receiver. A great route runner, he makes every grab and will use his versatility to find role as a swing player for several positions.
CFN Projection: Fourth Round

109. CB Curtis Brown, Texas 6-0, 185
He’s just not fast enough. He might be smooth as glass and he jumped out of the stadium with a jaw-dropping 39.5” vertical, but the 4.54 at the Combine didn’t get the job done. Quick, tough, and athletic enough to be used as a kick and punt returner if needed, he moves without a problem and he effortlessly flies around the field. He’ll get beaten up by the bigger receivers and he only made two picks in 52 career games, but he broke up 32 passes and he has the experience and skills to be a nice part of a good secondary. While he’ll never be the main man, he’ll be worth a long look as a No. 2 corner but will show his worth as a to special teamer.
CFN Projection: Third Round

110. DT Jarvis Jenkins, Clemson 6-4, 310
With the right frame and the right bulk he looks the part of an NFL defensive lineman. Now he has to put in the time and the effort to become special. Quick for his size and with decent strength against the run, he has good skills and will work to improve them. A good leader, he’ll never dog it and he’ll be extremely coachable. Now he has to get into the weight room to get far stronger after coming up with a mere 17 reps on the bench at the Combine, and he has to learn how to be a pass rusher. He has the size and he has the athleticism, but he didn’t get to the quarterback in college and has to put it all together.
CFN Projection: Third Round

111. RB John Clay, Wisconsin 6-1, 230 (Jr.)
While he got in better shape to up his stock, he’s a hamburger away from ballooning up again with way too much bad weight. However, even though he played with a spare tire, he brought peerless power and stunning breakaway speed for a player of his size as one of the nation’s most productive backs over the last few years. With his style, though, he was beaten on and always seems to have issues with his ankles and knees. Fumbles were a problem for a time, and if he can’t hang on to the ball as a short-yardage back, he won’t last long. He’s worth drafting for his power, but he’ll only work if he keeps his weight down to under 250.
CFN Projection: Fifth Round

112. DT Muhammad Wilkerson, Temple 6-4, 315 (Jr.)
While his production mostly came in MAC play, he was ultra-productive and ultra-reliable as the anchor of a very good Temple defense. With his size and bulk, he has the raw mass needed to sit in the middle someone’s line, but he also has the tools and the quickness to get into the backfield and work as a 3-4 end if needed. Now he has to get better and go to work on coming up with more creative moves. He got by on simply having better skills than everyone he was facing, but that’s not going to work at the next level. He needs coaching and needs technique work, and he’ll probably be overdrafted in a strong class of tackles, but the potential and talent are undeniable.
CFN Projection: Second Round

113. CB Rashad Carmichael, Virginia Tech 5-10, 192
While he plays fast and he’s known for being a speed corner, he didn’t time well at the Combine with a slowish 4.51. Very quick, he managed to make up for his mistakes with his athleticism coming up with ten picks over the last two seasons. While he’s not all that big, he’s tough against the run is more than happy to get physical against the bigger receivers. However, he’s not a great tackler and can’t move over to safety. Coachable, he’ll do whatever is needed to help the team, including on special teams, and he should eventually be a strong nickel or dime defender.
CFN Projection: Fourth Round

114. TE D.J Williams, Arkansas 6-2, 245
While he’s a bit too small to be an elite NFL tight end, he’s an elite pass catcher who makes up for his shortcomings with impeccable character and by sucking in every throw he can get a hand on. The Mackey Award winner, he was an overrated college player but has enough talent, quickness, and toughness to become a very good No. 2 tight end option. Think Aaron Hernandez but with better blocking skills.
CFN Projection: Fourth Round

115. QB T.J. Yates, North Carolina 6-3, 219
Watch him against LSU in the 2010 opener or against Tennessee in the bowl game and he looks like a can’t-miss prospect. He was in total command of the Tar Heel offense at times and he’s ready to go right away in a pro style attack and potentially produce. However, it seems like it takes two days for his passes to get to the target and he got dinged around way too often. He has the upside to take a flier on late and hope for a lesser-armed Matt Schaub.
CFN Projection: Fifth Round

116. C Kristofer O'Dowd, USC 6-4, 303
A superstar recruit of superstar USC recruits, he had a nice career … when he was healthy. While he’s not a great athlete and he’s always going to be hurt, when he’s right he’s a great leader and a pure center who can handle all the line calls and sniff out all the blitzes. Only a center, don’t think about moving him to guard, and he’s not going to be the most powerful player, but he could be a very nice starter for a long time if, and it’s a glaring if, he can stay healthy.
CFN Projection: Fifth Round

117. FB Anthony Sherman, Connecticut 5-10, 242
A great East-West Shrine week upped his stock after a strong season paving the way for Jordan Todman. A strong producer who doesn’t get pushed around, he’s a leader who’ll always battle and will always lead by example. He’s not an athlete and he won’t be a receiver, and he’ll be in for one thing and one thing only – run blocking – but he’ll be great at it.
CFN Projection: Fourth Round

118. WR Edmund Gates, Abilene Christian 5-11, 192
On the plus side, he’s still scratching the surface. On the negative, he’s going to be 25. The former basketball player has all-world speed and can blow past anyone, but he’s not just going to be a track guy playing football. With a great attitude and high character, he’ll do what’s needed to be better and work on the little things. He is hardly polished, is too old, and isn’t big, but he’s a special athlete and he should be a home run hitter who thrives as a No. 3 deep threat who can exploit single coverage.
CFN Projection:
Fourth Round

119. C Alex Linnenkohl, Oregon State 6-2, 304
While he’s not all that tall, he’s built to be a center with a good base and good leverage. He’s a pure leader who does a great job on all the line calls and always brings the A effort and makes big blocks on want-to and hustle. However, he doesn’t have the raw skills and the basic talent to be a standout. He’s a football player, but the NFL strength and athleticism aren’t there.
CFN Projection: Fourth Round

120. OT DeMarcus Love, Arkansas (OG) 6-5, 318
With a great frame and good bulk, he could work as a guard if absolutely needed. He’s always fighting and always looking to bury his man. However, he doesn’t look the type of an NFL guard and he’s not quite athletic enough to be a top tackle. After a rough off-season of workouts, looking overmatched in the Senior Bowl practices, he’s not a great fit for any pro attack. He’ll be a decent part of a line, but he won’t be a great starter to rely on to do much shoving around.
CFN Projection: Fifth Round

121. FS Jerrard Tarrant, Georgia Tech 6-0, 204 (Jr.)
With excellent size and the ability to throw his weight around, he’s a strong safety who’ll end up shining as a free safety. While not a blazer, the former cornerback moves extremely well and makes a ton of plays when the ball is in the air. The talent is there and the measurables are good enough to get by, but there are character concerns. He missed the entire 2008 season due to a sexual assault charge that was later dropped, but he had problems in the classroom and wasn’t exactly known as the hardest of workers. The NFL doesn’t care as long as you can play, and Tarrant can ball. He needs coaching and has to keep his nose clean, but as long as there aren’t any problems, he can become a solid NFL producer.
CFN Projection: Fifth Round

122. RB Anthony Allen, Georgia Tech, 6-1, 228
With a terrific blend of size, speed, and quickness, he’s an intriguing prospect on his measureables alone. While it’s always tough to figure out what a back in a Paul Johnson option offense can do at the next level, he has the ability and the potential to be a stud when he gets the ball in space. Forget about him as a receiver and he doesn’t use his size for any power, but in a zone-blocking scheme he could be ultra-productive in an Arian Foster kind of way.
CFN Projection: Fifth Round

123. WR Niles Paul, Nebraska 6-1, 224
A compact, tough receiver who can play inside or out, and while he’s not all that fast, he has functional speed and he can find ways to get open. Extremely strong, he’ll hit people in the ground game and he has no problem against the more physical defensive backs. While he has some good tools, he’s not a great wide receiver and was never healthy last year. Some will want to compare him to Anquan Boldin, but he doesn’t have the hands and he’s not the type who’ll get open against a defense trying to stop him. CFN Projection: Fourth Round

124. ILB Chris White, Mississippi State 6-3, 240
The tools aren’t there to be special, he only came up with 17 reps on the bench at the Combine, and he doesn’t move all that well, but he’s a big framed inside defender who cleans up messes extremely well. A great leader and perfect for the middle, he’ll make every tackle he’ll get to. He’s not a factor in pass coverage and he doesn’t move smoothly, but despite his rigid style he pursues well and he plays fast on the field. His straight-line speed, checking with a 4.67 40, is solid. Just a guy, he’ll be a part of a rotation, but he’s not going to be a special starter by any stretch.
CFN Projection: Fifth Round

125. RB Dion Lewis, Pitt 5-7, 193 (Soph.)
It’ll be easy to try to compare him to LeSean McCoy, but he’s not the same runner and he’s not quite as big. Even so, he’s so quick when he gets a little bit of room to move and he zips and cuts on a dime. While he might not be an every down back and he’s going to be a bit of a specialist, especially on third downs, he’ll be effective when he gets his chances. Always dinged up, he can’t be counted on for a full season and he’ll disappear for stretches, but some offensive coordinator will be really, really happy with a new toy to play with.
CFN Projection: Third Round

126. SS Jeron Johnson, Boise State (SS) 5-10, 212
Athletic and tough, he has the raw tools and ability, helped by 23 reps on the bench, to be a solid strong safety. He moves well and he’s built for the position with a thick frame and a compact hitting ability. Experienced, he was a regular over the last four seasons for the strong Bronco secondary and was ultra-productive. While he’s a big hitter, he’s going to knock himself out of games. He didn’t at Boise State, but he might be too physical for his own good. Yes, he’s athletic, but he’s not going to do too much against the pass.
CFN Projection: Fourth Round

127. DT Jerrell Powe, Ole Miss 6-2, 335
He should’ve been better. A superstar recruit in 2005 who went through the ringer trying to overcome a slew of issues to finally get academically eligible, he turned out to be good and he was a leader of some talented and productive lines. With the thick body and a good frame, he has a big body with the size to sit on the nose, but he’s not a stick-in-the-mud; he can get into the backfield. He’ll have no problem holding his own against double teams and he never has a issue with his motor. The problem is that he wears down instantly and there’s no chance that he’ll be able to deal with all the complexities of playing in the NFL, but he’ll make it on a team that needs a strong body for the interior.
CFN Projection: Fifth Round

128. CB Brandon Hogan, West Virginia 5-10, 192
Very fast and with the raw wheels to hang around with any target, he has the athleticism and he has the strength, coming up with 19 reps on the bench. He cuts on a dime and has the right attitude of a No. 1 corner. He’s always up for a challenge and is great at battling with the top targets. Now he has to learn how to use all his talents to be a better all-around player. Forget about stopping the run and he doesn’t use his strength like he should against the stronger targets. While he doesn’t have to serve any jail time after a DUI, there are still major question marks about his character. He could turn out to be a fantastic steal as long as he’s used the right way and as long as he has the right coaching to maximize his talents.
CFN Projection: Fourth Round

129. CB Johnny Patrick, Louisville 5-11, 191
A strong senior season turned him into a good prospect, but he has to show that last year wasn’t a fluke. With good size and nice quickness, he has the look and he has the burst, but he’s not fast and he’s not fluid. The 4.55 at the Combine was bad, a knee injury kept him from being doing much on the quickness drills, and the 13 reps on the bench were disappointing considering there are some who might think of him as a possible safety. However, he’s physical and he’s not afraid to come up with help against the run. Not known as a high-character team guy, he’ll have to have a fire lit under him and he’ll have to prove he’s tough enough to be a consistent No. 2 corner. He’s a good football player, but he has to maximize his potential.
CFN Projection: Third Round

130. ILB Akeem Dent, Georgia 6-3, 242
There are few linebackers with his look and his size. He comes right out of central casting with a muscular frame and the functional strength to back it up. Built for the middle, he’s tough enough to take on any inside job and is just quick enough to play outside if needed. A good leader and a good worker, he also showed a nice burst in Indy and looked more impressive at times than the other prospects. While he was impressive in the quickness drills, he’s not a factor for the pass defense and he missed a bit too many tackles. If he’s surrounded by players who’ll funnel plays his way, he’ll be fine.
CFN Projection: Fourth Round

131. TE Zack Pianalto, North Carolina 6-3, 256
Fantastic at the Combine, he made everyone go back to the video to take a longer look at what he did for the Tar heels. He has good size, is a nice receiver, and can be a dangerous and reliable short-to-midrange target. He’s a strong route runner for the passing game and a good blocker for the ground attack, but he has a hard time staying healthy and will never, ever, be around for 16 games. What you see is what you get; there’s not much upside, but he’s plenty good as is.
CFN Projection: Sixth Round