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2011 NFL Draft - 5th Round Talents
TCU WR Jeremy Kerley
TCU WR Jeremy Kerley
CollegeFootballNews.com
Posted Apr 25, 2011


From the college football perspective, here's CFN's 2011 pre-draft ranking of the players with fifth round talent.

2011 NFL Draft Position Rankings

Fifth Round Talents


By Pete Fiutak

2011 CFN Talent Rankings
- 1st Rounders
- 2nd Rounders
- 3rd Rounders
- 4th Rounders
- 5th Rounders
- 6th Rounders
- 7th Rounders 
- Top Free Agent Talents 

2011 NFL Prospect Rankings & Breakdowns
- QBs | RBs | FBs | WRs
- TEs | OTs | OGs | Cs 
- OLBs | ILBs | DTs | DEs
- CBs | Ss

- CFN 2010 NFL Draft Team Rankings

2011 NFL Draft Top Prospects
- Offensive | Defense 

2010 NFL Draft Analysis

1st Round (1-16)
1st Round (17-32)
2nd Round
3rd Round
4th Round
5th Round
6th Round
7th Round
Top Free Agents

2010 CFN Talent Rankings

- 1st Rounders
- 2nd Rounders
- 3rd Rounders
- 4th Rounders
- 5th Rounders
- 6th Rounders
- 7th Rounders 
- Top Free Agent Talents 

2010 CFN Position Rankings & Analysis

- QBs | RBs | WRs | TEs
- Cs | OTs | OGs | DEs
- DTs | ILBs | OLBs
- Ss | CBs 

132. WR Jeremy Kerley, TCU 5-9, 189
A very good, very nice college player who turned into a killer of a home run hitter, the problem is that he’s a smallish player who relies on a speed game, but without the speed. It’s one thing to put a nail in Wyoming’s coffin, but he’s not fast enough make anything big happen on a regular basis in the NFL. He’s quick and can be used as a return man, but he’ll be a disappointing receiver who’ll only be a No. 3.
CFN Projection:
Fourth Round

133. TE Virgil Green, Nevada 6-3, 249
The tight end star of the Combine, he made jaws drop with his special athleticism highlighted by a 42” vertical and a 10’10” broad jump. The 4.56 40 wasn’t bad, either. While he’s not all that big and he’s not going to beat anyone up, he’s such a great athlete and he’s such a strong pass catcher that he could be the focal point of a passing game. He could be scratching the surface on what he can become now that he’ll be a part of a pro-style attack, but he’s more of an H-Back than a true tight end. He won’t be for anyone.
CFN Projection: Third Round

134. OT Jason Pinkston, Pitt (OG) 6-3, 317
A great pass protector with good bulk on a decent frame. While he’s not a prototype tackle, he looks like an NFL player and can mash well; he could end up being better suited as a quicker guard than a clunkier tackle. He’s not a left tackle and he’s not going to handle any speed rushers, but he could play on the right side and could be a decent starter if he can stay healthy and get past a shoulder problem.
CFN Projection: Fifth Round

135. OLB Jeremy Beal, Oklahoma (DE) 6-3, 262
With excellent size and a great ability to get into the backfield, he was an elite pass rusher at the collegiate level and was tremendously productive on a consistent basis over three years. His future could be as a 4-3 defensive end and a possible pass rushing specialist, but he’s a good enough all-around football player who doesn’t take too many wasted steps and makes up for his shortcomings by always being in the right spot. The problem is his painful lack of speed and athleticism, registering a jaw-dropping 5.16 in the 40, and his other Combine numbers were awful. There’s a limit on what he can do and what he can become, but he was so productive at such a high level that he’s worth a long look at a starting spot somewhere.
CFN Projection: Fourth Round

136. SS Shiloh Keo, Idaho 5-11, 219
A terrific college player who went almost completely unnoticed, he did a little of everything for an abysmal Vandal defense. A great baller, he’s not fast and he doesn’t have the raw measureables, but he’s extremely quick, a great hitter, and he’s as experienced as any player in the draft with 54 games logged in. Extremely strong, he came up with 24 reps on the bench and he brings the A effort on every play, but he needs to get in better overall shape and can only function close to the line. A below-the-rim player who won’t do provide much help on deep plays and in pass coverage, there’s a limit on what he can do. There’s a little bit of an attitude issue and he’ll be a bit limited to just being a strong safety in the right scheme, but he’ll make a ton of plays and he’ll be a big part of a run defense.
CFN Projection: Fourth Round

137. OLB Lawrence Wilson, Connecticut 6-1, 229
Way too small and build like a short safety, he doesn’t have the look of an NFL linebacker and he isn’t going to get any bigger. However, he’s as tough as nails, he hits with anger, and he’s a guided missile who blows up ball-carriers. A durable rock, he’s always playing and always tackling with over 100 stops in three of his four seasons. He’s going to be a part of a rotation, but he’ll be a good producer who’ll always give an honest day’s work.
CFN Projection: Fourth Round

138. RB Stevan Ridley, LSU 5-11, 225 (Junior)
A strong, powerful back who provides a thump, he managed to be the only thing that consistently worked for the painful LSU offense. Always working and always coming up with positive yards, he’s a physical producer who’ll come up with a few extra inches after getting stopped. While he’s not speedy and he’s not going to hit any home runs, he’ll be a good complimentary back if there are other fast options to play around with. While he doesn’t do anything at a high level, he’ll be strong enough a runner to get a long look in a backfield.
CFN Projection: Fifth Round

139. DT Kenrick Ellis, Hampton 6-5, 346
A massive, MASSIVE body who blocks out the sun, he’s a true tackle who has the ideal size needed to stuff the interior and hold up when getting slammed by double teams. He’ll have to show he can handle playing against the big boys on a regular basis after beating up players at the lower level, but he was good enough to start out at South Carolina. Booted after a slew of issues with drug tests, he has to prove he has the knucklehead streak kept under wraps and he has to prove that he wants to do all the little things needed to be great. In a draft full of great tackles he might not be worth the time and the patience if drafted too high, but it’s hard to find bodies like his and it’s hard to find players who can be as physical.
CFN Projection: Third Round

140. OT Jah Reid, UCF 6-7, 325
A polarizing prospect, he lost over 50 points over his college career and became a more agile, more effective blocker with a long, strong frame that’s tough to get around. He has worked to become a solid player and still could be scratching the surface on his talent, but he doesn’t sink down enough and tends to block like he’s 6-7. He’s not the quickest or most athletic blocker around, and he’ll never work on the left side, but someone is going to be really, really interested in the possibilities of a blocker with his frame.
CFN Projection: Fifth Round

141. OT Marcus Gilbert, Florida (OG) 6-6, 329
Enormous, the guy is a house and impossible to get around with long arms making him even tougher to get the edge on. While he’s probably going to be a guard in time, he has just enough quickness to take a shot at tackle. The problem is that he doesn’t play up to his size and his toughness is questionable to be a killer of a run blocker. Someone will want him because of his size and girth, but he needs a fire to be lit under him to reach his potential.
CFN Projection: Second Round

142. ILB Nick Bellore, Central Michigan 6-1, 245
A natural-looking man for the middle, he was phenomenally productive for four years making 472 tackles. He doesn’t miss a stop and he’s a tough, hard-working, lunch pail type who gets his nose dirty on every play and leads well by both example and vocally. The problem comes against the good blockers. He gets erased too easily and can’t seem to fight through the trash well enough to be a run stuffer; he’s more of a tackler who runs to the ball. He is what he is; there’s nothing to develop and what you see is what you’re going to get.
CFN Projection: Fifth Round

143. OG Andrew Jackson, Fresno State (C) 6-5, 299
While he doesn’t have the raw bulk most teams would like for a top interior blocker, he’s versatile enough to be more-than-serviceable at either guard or center. With great smarts and the type of character that wants to be a leader, he’ll do whatever is needed to stick around. Not an athlete, he’s not going to do much on the move, and he doesn’t have the strength to push anyone. There’s nothing special about his game, but he’s not going to make any mistakes and he’ll be as reliable as they come.
CFN Projection: Fifth Round

144. OG Zach Hurd, Connecticut (OT) 6-7, 324
Part tackle prospect and part guard, he’s a bit too tall for the interior and a bit too slow for the outside. However, he does a nice job of getting on the move, and he comes up with the big hit down the field. He’ll likely start out as a decent right tackle, but he’ll probably be a better guard with a little bit of work. Unfortunately, he plays a bit too tall and he has to learn how to get lower to be an NFL run blocker. While he’ll never be a great starter, his versatility will make him valuable.
CFN Projection: Fifth Round

145. WR Greg Salas, Hawaii 6-1, 210
Ultra-productive, Salas sucked in everything that came his way in a tremendously productive career. Of course, he played for Hawaii and got more than his share of chances, but with good size, decent speed, and excellent hands, but he doesn’t have great quickness and isn’t explosive in any way. He’s hardly the most complete wide receiver, but he’s going to find a way to fit in any system and he should become a whale of a third down target.
CFN Projection:
Fifth Round

146. RB Jamie Harper, Clemson 6-0, 233 (Junior)
A big back who moves surprisingly well and can be used as a receiver and a blocker as well as a between-the-tackles runner. While he was a good back for Clemson, he wasn’t necessarily great and he wasn’t a featured back for all that long. If he can keep in shape and if he’s willing to do all the little things, he could carve out a nice career for himself. He’ll never be a No. 1 and he’ll never be a star, but he could be great if he’s okay with becoming a jack-of-all-trades.
CFN Projection: Fifth Round

147. WR Austin Pettis, Boise State 6-2, 209
With good size and great route running ability, he’s a good wide receiver who’s a better football player than an athlete. He’ll catch everything that comes his way and he came up with several nice deep plays over his years at Boise State, but he’s way too slow, isn’t quick, and he doesn’t use his size well enough as a blocker. He’ll be a third receiver who becomes ultra-reliable on short-to-midrange routes, but he’ll be erased by any NFL defensive back who’s trying to stop him. He’ll probably be overdrafted.
CFN Projection:
Fourth Round

148. OG Justin Boren, Ohio State 6-3, 309
It’s a stretch to call him a disappointment, but after starting out his career at Michigan and moving to Ohio State, he never progressed into the type of dominant blocker he was expected to become. He’ll fight and he has a mean, confident streak that serves him well, but he’s not an athlete and he has to beat people up in short spaces. As long as he doesn’t have to move, he’ll be fine.
CFN Projection: Sixth Round

149. CB Kendric Burney, North Carolina 5-9, 186
SLOWWWWWWW. He’s quick on the field and he plays fast, but his 4.72 at the Combine was a disaster. A better football player than an athlete, he’s not big enough, he didn’t show much in the vertical and the long jump, and he doesn’t have the look of a top-shelf corner. His game film is great and he’s great at battling with the better receivers, but he was abused by Miami’s Leonard Hankerson at the Senior Bowl. He’ll never be a No. 1 corner, but he’s a strong enough talent, despite the lack of skills, to be a regular somewhere in the secondary. He won’t be able to hang with anyone with speed, but he could be fantastic as a nickel or dime defender.
CFN Projection: Fourth Round

150. WR Cecil Shorts, Mount Union 6-0, 205
For a guy coming from Mount Union, there needs to be some semblance of sizzle. The problem is that he’s not fast, isn’t going to come up with the big plays in the NFL that he did in D-III, and isn’t physical. However, while he’s not going to be dynamic, he could be steady. A great route runner with impeccable character and a great personality, he’ll make up for his issues by doing all the little things right. As long as the expectations are kept low, he should be a decent No. 3 receiver with a little bit of time.
CFN Projection:
Fourth Round

151. CB Chris Rucker, Michigan State 6-1, 195
He always acted like a No. 1 corner and relished a challenge, but he didn’t always produce. He’s one of the bigger corners in the draft and he’s fast for his size, but he didn’t run at the Combine and he came up with a pathetic ten reps on the bench. Even so, he’s physical and he’s a terrific tackler who’s always willing to try to beat up the bigger receivers. For good or bad, his future is as a safety if he can get stronger, but he lacks the raw speed and he gives up too many big plays to be a regular producer on the outside. Character is an issue on and off the field, and he thinks he’s better than he is, but there’s enough there to think he could develop into a decent part of a rotation.
CFN Projection: Fifth Round

152. OG Will Rackley, Lehigh 6-3, 309
He went from being a decent prospect to a must-see after the East-West Shrine practices. A tackle in college, he needs to be a guard. There’s no athleticism whatsoever and was a disaster in the raw workouts at the Combine, but he’s better on the field than he looked in the drills. He’ll get tried out at tackle, but he’s way, way too slow to handle himself against a decent pass rusher, and he’s not bulky enough to be a major factor on the inside.
CFN Projection: Fourth Round

153. RB Derrick Locke, Kentucky 5-8, 188
He’s always going to have an injury problem in one way or another, and he’s not going to get any bigger and he’s not going to hit anyone, but if given the chance he’ll be the difference in at least two wins a year. A case could be made that he was the best all-around back in the SEC over the last few years with great hands for the receiving game, terrific kick return skills, and excellent speed and quickness. He’ll never be a featured back, but he’ll be around for a long time as a returner and a third down back.
CFN Projection: Fifth Round

154. CB Shareece Wright, USC 5-11, 185
Can he hold up? Fast, he came up with a 4.46 at the Combine and he was solid during the drills, but he’s only a few years removed from a broken neck and he missed almost all of 2009 with academic issues. A one-year wonder, he came up with a strong senior year with 73 tackles, but he never lived up to the hype coming out of high school. He has the raw tools to be fantastic with a little bit of time, but he’s a better athlete than a football player. He needs a ton of technique work and has to show he can make things happen with the ball is in the air, but with his speed and his motor he should be a nice backup who sees time in nickel situations.
CFN Projection: Third Round

155. OT Byron Bell, New Mexico (OG) 6-5, 348
The huge blocker has the raw strength and the size to be a pounder of a run blocker. No one is going to push him around, and forget about getting any sort of a bull rush on him. He’s not quick and he doesn’t move too well, and he’s almost certainly going to be a guard early on in his career. Does he have the athleticism to survive in the league? That’s a huge question mark, but the bigger concern will be his lack of consistency. He was the best player on the Lobo line by far, but he didn’t always play like it.
CFN Projection: Fifth Round

156. TE Lee Smith, Marshall 6-6, 266
Very tall and with tremendous weight room strength, he’s an interesting prospect with enough tools to get some people very excited about his potential as a short-range pass catcher and a blocker. The problem is that he’s SLOWWWWW, but as one of the best run blocking tight ends in the draft, he’ll be great for a tough ground game. He’ll never be the type of star that fans get fired up about, but coaches will love him.
CFN Projection: Fifth Round

157. CB Buster Skrine, UT Chattanooga 5-9, 186
While he wasn’t the fastest player at the Combine, he looked the part with a 4.43 and has been times around 4.3. Smooth and athletic, he also has the strength to go along with the speed coming up with 20 reps on the bench. Not all that big and not a strong tackler, he’s not going to do much in run support and he’s going to get shoved around. Extremely raw, he’ll need at least a year of hardcore NFL coaching to improve his technique. With his wheels and his athleticism, there’s a ton of upside and he’s just scratching the surface, but he’ll most likely make his biggest impact as a returner early on.
CFN Projection: Fourth Round

158. FB Owen Marecic, Stanford 6-1, 248
Part fullback and part linebacker, he was a true, old-school football player for the Cardinal, but now he’ll only be a fullback. Tough as nails and a willing, blaster of a blocker, he’ll be a fan favorite with his try-hard ability. He’ll never carry the ball outside of the goal line and he’s not a great athlete, but he’ll go all day and he’ll never skimp on the effort. In time he should grow into a ser of a run blocker.
CFN Projection: Fifth Round

159. SS Jermale Hines, Ohio State 6-1, 219
Part defensive back, part linebacker, he’s a rock against the run with big-time hitting ability. He might not be all that fast, but he moves well enough for what he has to do. While he goes for the highlight reel pop way too often when the routing play would do, he misses too many easy stops. Not much in pass coverage and not instinctive when the ball is in the air, he’s only good for a run defense that needs a popper in the defensive backfield. Special teams will be his calling early on, but his future as a possible starter only depends on his ability to show something against a decent passing attack.
CFN Projection: Fifth Round

160. Rob Housler, Florida Atlantic 6-5, 248
A terrific athlete, he was the fastest of the tight ends at the Combine tearing off a 4.55 while zipping through the short drills, but while he’s a great athlete with excellent speed, he’s not bulky and he’ll be mediocre when it comes to providing the big block. He’s not the most natural of receivers and he’s not a great route runner, but don’t be shocked if he’s not a much better pro than he was a collegian.
CFN Projection: Fourth Round

161. CB Jalil Brown, Colorado 6-1, 204
While he’s not a blazer and he’s not ever going to be able to hang with the receivers with dangerous deep speed, he came up with 24 reps on the bench at the Combine and showed just enough talent to potentially move to safety. Not quite as physical as he needs to be, he’s not a rock-solid tackler and he gets pushed around way too much for a player of his size. Even with his issues, he makes lots of plays and he brings a great attitude. Willing to do whatever a coaching staff wants, he’ll be a special teamer, a nickel defender, or anything needed to help out the team. He’s not going to be a regular starter, but he should be a good producer in the right role.
CFN Projection: Fourth Round

162. OLB Scott Lutrus, Connecticut 6-2, 241
A nice-sized, rock-solid versatile defender, he can work at any linebacker spot and can hold his own and produce. Surprisingly mobile at the Combine, he tested better than he plays on the field with a tremendous 38” vertical and great quickness in the short drills. He’s not a pass defender and he doesn’t do anything at a high level, but he’s a good all-around football player when he can stay healthy. He’d be higher on more draft boards if he didn’t have major shoulder problems suffering stingers on a regular basis. The injuries are going to prove limiting.
CFN Projection: Sixth Round

163. WR Tori Gurley, South Carolina 6-4, 216 (Soph.)
While it might seem like Gurley should’ve stuck around, he’s going to be 24 and Alshon Jeffery is the clear star of the South Carolina passing show. Even though he has a slew of concerns from his lack of pure athleticism and inability to use his size to be physical, he’s very big, catches everything, and moves well enough for his size to get by. While he might not be a special receiver, he has just enough raw skills to get a long, long look. On his hands alone he could find a role as a reliable third down target.
CFN Projection:
Fifth Round

164. OLB Chris Carter, Fresno State (DE) 6-1, 248
Fresno State had no pass rush whatsoever without Carter. Fast off the ball and a force at getting into the backfield, he’s a disruptive force who can be used as a smallish defensive end or as a long, very strong outside linebacker. With a great fire for the game and good character, he’s coachable and will do whatever is needed. He’s not great against the run and he doesn’t have the elite athleticism needed to be a situational pass rusher, so it might be hard to find a regular spot for him. Consider him a poor man’s Von Miller, but with a better motor.
CFN Projection: Third Round

165. FB Stanley Havili, USC 6-0, 230
While he’s not going to beat anyone up, and he’s not a big, blasting blocker, he needs to be in the right system to be successful and needs an NFL weight room to get bigger. A top receiver, he’s a natural catching the ball and he’s a good runner when he gets his chances. Arguably the best athlete among the fullback prospects, he makes up for his lack of thumping ability by moving well.
CFN Projection: Fifth Round