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2011 NFL Draft - 6th Round Talents
Alabama QB Greg McElroy
Alabama QB Greg McElroy
CollegeFootballNews.com
Posted Apr 25, 2011


From the college football perspective, here's CFN's 2011 pre-draft ranking of the players with sixth round talent.

2011 NFL Draft Position Rankings

Sixth Round Talents


By Pete Fiutak

2011 CFN Talent Rankings
- 1st Rounders
- 2nd Rounders
- 3rd Rounders
- 4th Rounders
- 5th Rounders
- 6th Rounders
- 7th Rounders 
- Top Free Agent Talents 

2011 NFL Prospect Rankings & Breakdowns
- QBs | RBs | FBs | WRs
- TEs | OTs | OGs | Cs 
- OLBs | ILBs | DTs | DEs
- CBs | Ss

- CFN 2010 NFL Draft Team Rankings

2011 NFL Draft Top Prospects
- Offensive | Defense 

2010 NFL Draft Analysis

1st Round (1-16)
1st Round (17-32)
2nd Round
3rd Round
4th Round
5th Round
6th Round
7th Round
Top Free Agents

2010 CFN Talent Rankings

- 1st Rounders
- 2nd Rounders
- 3rd Rounders
- 4th Rounders
- 5th Rounders
- 6th Rounders
- 7th Rounders 
- Top Free Agent Talents 

2010 CFN Position Rankings & Analysis

- QBs | RBs | WRs | TEs
- Cs | OTs | OGs | DEs
- DTs | ILBs | OLBs
- Ss | CBs 

166. OLB Doug Hogue, Syracuse 6-2, 235
The former running back moves extremely well and cuts like a good all-around athlete. He zips all over the place and he can fly into the backfield when needed, but he’s still trying to become a real, live linebacker. He needs to hit the weight room harder and he doesn’t have a defender’s instincts, but he was fantastic in post-season workouts and has the character and the makeup to work to get better. Very coachable, he’ll do whatever it takes to contribute early on, and he’s just scratching the surface and could pay off big-time in a few years.
CFN Projection: Fourth Round

167. QB Greg McElroy, Alabama 6-2, 220
There’s no questioning his smarts, just missing out on becoming a Rhodes Scholar, and he’s mega-tough, but he doesn’t have a great arm and he has limited tools. A great leader who happened to be a perfect fit for a national title team, he was great at being a game manager - and not in a bad way - keeping the mistakes to a minimum. There’s nothing there to think he can be a regular starter, but he could have a good career as a reliable backup.
CFN Projection: Sixth Round

168. RB Evan Royster, Penn State 6-0, 212
Penn State’s all-time leading rusher, he’s more of a tough, plodding producer than a flashy home run hitter. He didn’t exactly get a whole bunch of help from some mediocre lines, and he didn’t do anything too memorable, but he’s smart, tough, coachable, and can catch the ball. There’s nothing there to suggest he can be special or a No. 1 back, but he’ll be a decent enough No. 2 to count on for 7-to-10 key touches per game.
CFN Projection: Sixth Round

169. OG David Arkin, Missouri State 6-4, 300
A mauler with decent strength and tremendous smarts, he’ll work his tail off to become a player. It would be nice if he was about 20 pounds heavier, but he doesn’t have the room to carry any extra weight well. When he gets to a defender, he buries him. Not good enough or athletic enough to be a regular starting tackle, he’s a bit of a tweener. He’s good, but if he makes it it’ll be on sheer want-to and toughness.
CFN Projection: Fourth Round

170. OLB Brooks Reed, Arizona (DE) 6-2, 263
Insanely strong, he’s a big, physical defender who has the size and the toughness to work on the line as a pass rushing 4-3 end, and he’s just fast enough to be a decent outside linebacker. With a good fire and a passion for the game, he brings the want-to and the work ethic, fighting to do whatever he needs to. He’s missing the raw athleticism to ever be great, and he’s not going to do anything in pass coverage, but he can be a functional starter who comes up with a nice career if he’s surrounded by better linebackers.
CFN Projection: Fourth Round

171. QB Pat Devlin, Delaware 6-3, 225
He looks the part. Devlin is a tall, polished passer who looks terrific in workouts and has the mechanics of an NFL quarterback. While he doesn’t have a deep arm, he’s accurate on midrange throws and he could carve out a very, very long career as a solid backup. With a little time, plug him in and he should be able to win a game or two. However, he’s a mediocre talent with problems being decisive. The lack of a deep arm will limit the options of where he can play, and it’s questionable whether or not the one-time Penn State Nittany Lion can hack it now that he’s out of the small pond.
CFN Projection: Fifth Round

172. OLB Mark Herzlich, Boston College (ILB) 6-4, 244
Before having to undergo his battle with cancer he was considered a sure-thing top ten pick and possibly the No. 1 overall prospect going into the 2009 season. While he’s a player to root for and he’s as hard a worker as any linebacker in the draft, he lost something in the fight. The weight room strength is there and he’s always going 100 miles per hour on the field, but he doesn’t have anywhere near the same speed or quickness he used to. On character and want-to, he can play on an NFL defense and be a good run defender and a productive part-time starter, but he’s not nearly the special player he once was.
CFN Projection: Sixth Round

173. OT Kyle Hix, Texas 6-7, 319
He looks the part. With great height, good bulk for his frame, and with the ability to carry a little more weight without much of a problem, he should’ve been a star but it didn’t really work out. All the tools are there and he handled himself well at a high Big 12 level, but he never dominated like he was supposed to and he didn’t do nearly enough for the ground game. He doesn’t play up to his size and he’s the definition of a finesse blocker.
CFN Projection: Sixth Round

174. WR Armon Binns, Cincinnati 6-3, 209
With excellent size and great receiving ability, he uses his frame well to push his way into the open and muscle out defensive backs to catch the ball. He’s not fast and he won’t ever get deep, and for his physical play he doesn’t block well enough, but he tries. The character is there and hands are enough to make him a dangerous short-range target, but he’s extremely limited.
CFN Projection:
Sixth Round

175. RB Noel Devine, West Virginia 5-7, 179
It was a bit of a stunner that he came back for his senior year, and then he struggled and went from being an intriguing NFL role player type to being an afterthought. Insanely strong for his size, he should be able bring a little bit of power and he’s quicker than his workouts show. Size is a big issue, even after putting on close to 20 pounds in a hurry over the last few months, and he times slowwwwwww. He fumbles too much, has a hard time staying healthy, and doesn’t have the raw skills. However, he should have some worth as a versatile backup and a kick returner.
CFN Projection: Sixth Round

176. RB Darren Evans, Virginia Tech 6-0, 227 (Junior)
He had the look of a rising superstar with a tremendous 2008, and then he tore up his knee before the 2009 season and he wasn’t quite the same in 2010. He’s a big back with good shiftiness and nice straight-line speed, but he’s not going to bust off any big runs and he’s not creative enough to come up with anything that’s not blocked for him. While he has good size, he also gets chopped down way too easily and doesn’t do a good enough job of getting small when needed. He’s not going to do anything special in the NFL, but he’ll be a part of a rotation and will be productive in spurts.
CFN Projection: Fifth Round

177. OG Bryant Browning, Ohio State (OT) 6-4, 319
A very tough, very big, smart blocker who blows up people in the running game on the inside, he’s just quick enough to be tried out on the outside at right tackle. He doesn’t look the part as an NFL full-timer, though, not moving quite well enough on a consistent basis while needing more work on his technique. There are plenty of issues, and there will be some who’ll blow him off because he doesn’t seem like he’ll fit anywhere, but he’s just versatile enough to hang around the league to carve out a nice career.
CFN Projection: Free Agent

178. DE Ricky Elmore, Arizona 6-5, 255
Is he a defensive end or is he an outside linebacker? A superior pass rusher who knows how to get to the quarterback, if he can add just a little more weight he should be a terrific 4-3 end. With his frame, he’s slippery and doesn’t stay blocked for too long and is tough as nails. He might not really look like it, but he can be beaten on and will always come back roaring. A true tweener, he’s not going to be great against the run, but he should carve out a nice role for himself as a third down pass rusher.
CFN Projection: Fifth Round

179. WR DeAndre Brown, Southern Miss 6-6, 233 (Jr.)
Very, VERY big and with good route running ability, he’s able to work to get open and he’s physical enough to battle to catch the ball. Like a smallish tight end, he needs a shot from a defensive back to get down. Unfortunately, he has never been the same since an ugly leg injury after originally looking like a sure-thing NFL star, and while he has interesting size and good skills, he’s simply not an NFL athlete anymore. He acts like a first rounder when he’ll have to work his tail off to simply make a team.
CFN Projection:
Fifth Round

180. TE Weslye Saunders, South Carolina 6-5, 270
Extremely big and with good pass catching skills for a player of his size, he’s an interesting option if he can put it all together. The problem is his lack of athleticism combined with his poor strength. A player of his size should be able to blast away for the ground game, and he can’t. He needs a fire lit under him, and even so the upside might not be there because he’s not expected to work for it. After getting in trouble under Steve Spurrier, getting booted from the team for dealing with an agent, and now he’ll have to be perfect from Day One or he’ll be an easy cut.
CFN Projection: Sixth Round

181. SS Joe Lefeged, Rutgers 6-0, 210
While he’s a good defender who’s always making things happen, his real worth is as a special teamer with a phenomenal knack for coming up with blocked kicks while also having the speed and quickness to work as a returner. Smooth, he runs extremely well, breaking off a 4.43 at the Combine, and has the raw athleticism to work at either safety spot. While he’s not awful against the pass, he doesn’t have special ball skills and, defensively, he doesn’t do any one thing all that well. He only picked off two passes in 50 games of work, and it would be nice if he was a bit bigger, but he’s too good on special teams and too good an athlete to not be a key part of a roster.
CFN Projection: Fourth Round

182. DE Pierre Allen, Nebraska 6-4, 273
Surrounded by tremendous talent, including Ndamukong Suh, he played big and showed he could be the type of lineman who can work in any system. The problem is that he didn’t produce as well as he should have. While he’s a decent pass rusher, there’s absolutely nothing special about his game and he’s more of a prospect on his hard-working attitude and his size than his pure talent. It seems like he should be fantastic, and he has the raw tools and the right look, but he just isn’t a great football player. He’ll have to show he can do at least one thing at a high level to stick, but with his frame and his athleticism, he should be a decent part of a rotation.
CFN Projection: Sixth Round

183. OT Jarriel King, South Carolina (OG) 6-5, 317
There are a bazillon red flags with physical issues – most notably a heart problem that was fixed – along with problems with the NCAA, but the biggest concern is his inability to ever play up to his talent level. All the skills are there with phenomenal size, long arms, and tremendous quickness and athleticism, but he doesn’t beat anyone up and he doesn’t have the consistency to be a regular starter. However, the tools are too good to ignore.
CFN Projection: Sixth Round

184. FS Will Hill, Florida 6-1, 202 (Jr.)
The talent is there and the skills are unquestioned, but it’s all about his character. A phenomenal recruit, even by Florida standards, he’s big, fast, and extremely smooth with all the tools if someone is willing to be patient and if he gets the right coaching. A willing hitter and a good special teamer, athletically there’s a place for him on any roster as a versatile playmaker. There’s a great chance he could be a far better pro than a collegian, starting just 15 times in three disappointing years, but he has to keep his ego in check and has to prove he has the character and the make-up to finally, finally, maximize all his talent. He has three kids, was suspended for a stretch, and was out of the mix way too often, but the upside is limitless … if he can manage to not blow it.
CFN Projection: Fifth Round

185. DE Ryan Winterswyk, Boise State 6-4, 268
A wildly productive, self-made performer who made himself into a force and the star of a productive line, he doesn’t have the tools or the talent, but he’s the type of player everyone wants. Not an athlete, not strong enough and without the raw NFL skills, he’ll never be anything great, but the former walk-on doesn’t take a play off. With the size and bulk to hold up against the run, he can work in almost any system. While he’ll never be a top starter, he’ll be an ultra-reliable backup who’ll be a fan favorite because of his effort. Unfortunately, he’s not going against Utah State anymore.
CFN Projection: Sixth Round

186. OT Willie Smith, East Carolina 6-5, 310
Shockingly smooth for his size, he moves well, looks the part, and fights to become a good player. Coachable, he’ll do whatever is asked and will play wherever needed, but he doesn’t have much in the way of pounding strength. He’s purely a finesse blocker, and while he could end up at left tackle, he’s not going to be a strong one. This is as good as he’s going to get; he’s about to turn 25.
CFN Projection: Fifth Round

187. WR Ronald Johnson, USC 5-11, 199
He had a good career at USC, but not a great one, and he doesn’t have anything special about his game to make him a must-have part of a passing game. He’s quick, gets open well, and isn’t afraid to get his nose dirty and come up with a big block or two, but he’s not all that big, gets pushed around, and has major problems hanging on to the ball. He’ll probably be overdrafted, and while he’ll make a team, he’ll be nothing more than just another guy.
CFN Projection:
Third Round

188. QB Nathan Enderle, Idaho 6-4, 240
It seems like he was at Idaho for 14 years. Experience isn’t a problem, and he has perfect size and arms strength, but he makes way too many mistakes and he was beaten up way too much partly because he hung on to the ball. A pure bomber who does a great job of seeing the field, he’ll have moments when he looks unstoppable. Getting the ball out quickly is a problem and he’s not going to move more than two steps, but if he gets behind a good line he could be an interesting bomber who has a big game here or there as a No. 2 option.
CFN Projection: Sixth Round

189. OG Tim Barnes, Missouri (C) 6-4, 297
While he was a terrific collegiate center, his skills don’t necessarily translate to the next level. He’s a bit undersized, but he moves well and he’s a good, strong leader who knows how to lead a line. While he doesn’t bring enough power to the running game, he can work in a zone-blocking scheme as a versatile swing player. He’s not going to be a top starter, but he’ll be valuable in the right system.
CFN Projection: Free Agent

190. OT Joe Barksdale, LSU (OG) 6-5, 325
Insanely strong and very big, he’ll make his money as a guard at some point in his career. While he has a massive body, he’s able to move well for his size and he shuffles into pass protection quickly. However, he doesn’t do much down the field and he doesn’t destroy his man. For a player with his bulk, he should be far, far better at burying a defender. He’ll be overdrafted.
CFN Projection: Third Round

191. WR Aldrick Robinson, SMU 6-0, 184
Fast, fast, fast. With fantastic deep wheels, he can make a team purely on his home-run hitting ability and has the hands to make the big grab whenever needed. Too small and too weak, he’ll get shoved around with a little bit of a push and he’ll never be a part of a running game even though he’ll try to block. With his athleticism, character, and speed, he’ll make a team, but he’ll struggle to find a role in the passing game and might have to shine as a returner. CFN Projection: Fifth Round

192. RB Delone Carter, Syracuse, 5-9, 222
Short and squatty, he shocked the Combine with a phenomenal workout that should move him up the charts. Great in between the tackles and extremely tough for his size, he’ll be a pinball bouncing off of tackles for positive yards. He’s not a receiver and won’t be a third down back, and he’s more of a strong, quick back than a fast home run hitter, but he’ll bring power and good energy.
CFN Projection: Fifth Round

193. OG Ray Dominguez, Arkansas 6-4, 334
He looks like he should be able to dominate and he looks like an NFL guard size-wise, but he doesn’t have great weight room strength, doesn’t carry his extra pounds well, and has gotten by on his bulk. He’s not going to move and he’s not all that versatile, but if you want a pure pounder for the ground game, he’ll fit. He’ll be worth a late-round flier for the right team.
CFN Projection: Sixth Round

194. RB Roy Helu, Jr., Nebraska 5-11, 219
There’s something missing. He’s a big back with blazing speed, and he’s one of the few true home run hitting backs in the draft. With great moves, nice wiggle, and with a one cut and gone burst, the measurables are all there. However, what he isn’t is powerful and runs way too softly for a player of his size. He’ll come up with a big game – like he did against Missouri in 2010 – and then he’ll disappear. There’s a great chance he could be far better as a pro, but he has to show he can be consistent.
CFN Projection: Fourth Round

195. OG Julian Vandervelde, Iowa (C) 6-2, 292
A Renaissance man who has a future doing something interesting, but it probably won’t be as an NFL lineman. He’s too small, too squatty, and doesn’t have the killer instinct to make up for the lack of bulk. Always banged up, he’s going to get beaten on at the next level and will have a tough time holding up. He has more going on in his world than football, and while that’s a great thing for him, it’ll be seen as a problem for some teams.
CFN Projection: Free Agent

196. CB Curtis Marsh, Utah State 6-0, 192
The former running back was timed in the 4.5s, but he stepped it up in Indy with a 4.46 to go along with his silky-smooth agility. He still needs work on figuring out the subtle nuances of the position, but he did enough to be known as a ball-hawk to stay away from. While it’ll take a little while before he harnesses all his skills, he’s such a talented, explosive athlete that he’s worth the effort. More than fine in nickel and dime packages early on, he’ll end up being a good all-around corner once he puts it all together. The upside is limitless.
CFN Projection: Fourth Round

197. C Jake Kirkpatrick, TCU 6-2, 301
The 2010 Rimington Award winner as the nation’s best center, Kirkpatrick is a short, squatty blocker who isn’t bad at dealing with stronger, bulkier defenders. However, he doesn’t look the part and he isn’t going to beat anyone up. He’s a smart, solid center who can’t be moved to guard and will struggle with the big NFL tackles, but he’s good enough to get by. He could be a starter, but he’ll be replaceable.
CFN Projection: Sixth Round

198. CB Chris Culliver, South Carolina (FS) 6-0, 199
Speed, speed, speed, speed, speed. In a draft class full of decent runners, Culliver takes it to another level timing in the sub-4.4s while flying through the ball drills at the Combine. He’s built well and has the strength and leaping ability to make scouts drool, he has to prove he can put it all together on the field. Talent-wise, he’s not really an NFL corner and he’s not really a safety with mediocre tackling skills and poor ball instincts. Always banged up, he’ll be a regular in the training room. Someone will be fired up to have him and he’ll impress in practices by flying all over the field, but he’ll be disappointing when the lights go on.
CFN Projection: Fourth Round

199. CB Josh Thomas, Buffalo 5-10, 191
Very fast and extremely explosive, Thomas ran a good 4.46 at the Combine and came up with a terrific 38 ½” vertical. He cuts well, moved fluidly, and is great at closing on a receiver in a heartbeat. Experienced, he started for four years and turned out to be a solid run stopper in the open field. He struggled a bit too much against mediocre competition and he only made two career picks, but he’s tough, fights to make plays, and has the raw tools needed to be a starter. While he doesn’t do anything at a high level, he’s a good enough all-around football player to be a regular in a rotation.
CFN Projection: Fourth Round

200. TE Julius Thomas, Portland State 6-5, 246
Is he the next Antonio Gates? No, but the former college basketball player is a terrific athlete who could become a good pro pass catcher if he can hit the weights. The 16 reps on the bench at the Combine was a big problem, but he’ll make it by being a speedy target more than a blocker. He gets down the field in a hurry and pops out of his cuts, and he’s just scratching the surface, but he could be worth the wait and the development.
CFN Projection: Fifth Round

201. OLB Bruce Miller, UCF (DE) 6-1, 254
An ultra-productive, extremely talented pass rusher, he’s always working and never takes a play off. He made himself into a top-shelf sack artist by busting his tail, and he’s going to do whatever it takes to make a roster. Extremely strong, he threw up 35 reps on the bench and apparently interviewed extremely well, but he just doesn’t have the raw talent or athleticism to be a top producer at the next level. He’s not athletic, he doesn’t have the right build, and outside of the weight room at the Combine, he proved to be too short, too slow, and too average. No one will outwork him, though.
CFN Projection: Sixth Round

202. OLB Brian Rolle, Ohio State 5-10, 229
Way too small, he might be used as a strong safety in the right packages, and he won’t be able to be anything more than a key part of a rotation. When he’s on the field, though, he’ll be a Tasmanian devil of a defender going full tilt all the time and always getting around the ball. He bring the fire on every play and he’s able to avoid blocks be outquicking most linemen. However, it’s over if anyone gets his hands on him and he’s not a good enough tackler to make all the plays needed. With his speed and motor he’ll be a fit for someone, but he’ll have to be a special teamer and will have to be used to being a role player.
CFN Projection: Fifth Round

203. SS DeJon Gomes, Nebraska 5-11, 208
Ultra-aggressive and very tough against the run, he worked a bit as an outside linebacker at times and always held up well against the run. He’ll make every stop in the open field and he’s more than willing to get his nose dirty to make the top play. The lack of athleticism is an issue and he’s not going to do much of anything against the pass, and while he hits like a linebacker, he also runs a bit like one. It would be nice if he was about 20 pounds heavier, but he’s not and will be limited to working as a top special teamer early on. Even so, he could find a role as a first down run defender.
CFN Projection: Sixth Round