Fiu, Cirminiello, Mitchell on TV - Campus Insiders | Buy College Football Tickets

2011 NFL Draft - 7th Round Talents
Wisconsin QB Scott Tolzien
Wisconsin QB Scott Tolzien
CollegeFootballNews.com
Posted Apr 25, 2011


From the college football perspective, here's CFN's 2011 pre-draft ranking of the players with seventh round talent.

2011 NFL Draft Position Rankings

Seventh Round Talents


By Pete Fiutak

2011 CFN Talent Rankings
- 1st Rounders
- 2nd Rounders
- 3rd Rounders
- 4th Rounders
- 5th Rounders
- 6th Rounders
- 7th Rounders 
- Top Free Agent Talents 

2011 NFL Prospect Rankings & Breakdowns
- QBs | RBs | FBs | WRs
- TEs | OTs | OGs | Cs 
- OLBs | ILBs | DTs | DEs
- CBs | Ss

- CFN 2010 NFL Draft Team Rankings

2011 NFL Draft Top Prospects
- Offensive | Defense 

2010 NFL Draft Analysis

1st Round (1-16)
1st Round (17-32)
2nd Round
3rd Round
4th Round
5th Round
6th Round
7th Round
Top Free Agents

2010 CFN Talent Rankings

- 1st Rounders
- 2nd Rounders
- 3rd Rounders
- 4th Rounders
- 5th Rounders
- 6th Rounders
- 7th Rounders 
- Top Free Agent Talents 

2010 CFN Position Rankings & Analysis

- QBs | RBs | WRs | TEs
- Cs | OTs | OGs | DEs
- DTs | ILBs | OLBs
- Ss | CBs 
204. QB Scott Tolzien, Wisconsin 6-2, 212
He could be an interesting sleeper. He doesn’t have a live arm, and he plays even smaller than he is by failing to go over the top with his midrange throws, but his character is unquestioned and he’ll have to get kicked out of a film room. A pure leader, he’ll hang in the pocket until the very last nanosecond before getting rid of the ball, but he’s not mobile, isn’t going to drive the ball, and his out passes will take ten years to get there. He’ll be a tough cut.
CFN Projection: Free Agent

205. DT Ian Williams, Notre Dame 6-1, 319
The talent was always there and the right body and frame were always there to dominate for the Irish, but it took a little while for it all to come together. When it did, he became a terrific player for the front line making things happen from the nose. Extremely tough, he could’ve sat out the second half of the 2010 season hurt after suffering a knee injury, but he worked to come back and finish out the year. While he’ll never get into the backfield and he needs to operate in a phone booth, he should grow into a nice two-down defender who holds up against the run. Forget about him getting into the backfield, and he’s not going to be an anchor, but he’ll stick around and should be a productive part of a rotation.
CFN Projection: Fifth Round

206. CB Marcus Gilchrist, Clemson (FS) 5-10, 195
A high-riser after a strong Combine, he can be used as a safety or a corner. Versatile is more of the right term for him than a tweener, but he doesn’t quite have the raw wheels to be a starting cover-corner and he doesn’t have the size to be a thumper of a safety. With 26 reps on the bench and 173 tackles over the last two seasons, he’s strong and productive, and he’s always going full-tilt with a great motor. Willing to do whatever it takes, he’s extremely coachable and he’s always bringing the A effort. Now someone has to figure out where he can play.
CFN Projection: Fourth Round

207. RB Da’Rel Scott, Maryland 5-11, 211
Decent-sized and very, very fast, Scott has the measurables to deserve a long look as both a back and a kick returner. Give him a little bit of room and he’s gone, and he’s quick enough to be an extremely productive one-cut NFL runner in the right system. While he might have a hard time staying healthy and he’s a better workout warrior than a football player, he could be a part of a rotation on raw speed alone.
CFN Projection: Free Agent

208. C Brandon Fusco, Slippery Rock (OG) 6-4, 302
Obviously the lower-level competition is an issue, but he more than held his own during Senior Bowl practices and was terrific at the Combine. One of the most athletic interior linemen in the draft for his size, he’s an intriguing prospect who’s worth drafting and worth giving a long, long look for somewhere in the interior. He might be just scratching the surface. With his size and his raw skills, he’ll make someone’s starting lineup.
CFN Projection: Fifth Round

209. DT Terrell McClain, South Florida 6-2, 297
The raw bulk isn’t quite there compared to other good nose tackles, but McClain makes up for it with tremendous strength. Not just a stick-in-the-mud, he has just enough quickness to get into the backfield once in a while and he’ll more than hold his own against the better blockers. The problem is his body. It would be nice if he was a bit bigger with more good weight, and he needs more time sculpting; he’s not going to get better in the weight room considering he’s one of the strongest tackles in the draft. Does he want to be a factor? He’s not known as a fighter and he’s not a jump-through-fire type of killer many might want. The tools are there to think he could be a solid starter, but he was just okay at USF and he has to work to translate his raw strength into more plays.
CFN Projection: Third Round

210. 16. DT Lawrence Guy, Arizona State 6-4, 305 (Jr.)
The raw tools are there. He has a great frame, he moves extremely well, and he can be moved around wherever needed. His versatility will make him a key backup able to work where needed, but that’s also part of his issue; he’s a tweener. He gets beaten up too much to be a star on the inside, and he’s not enough of a pass rusher to get in the backfield on a regular basis on the outside. Young, he has time to mature into his body and become an effective player who’ll have a long career in a rotation, but he might not be a regular starter.
CFN Projection: Fourth Round

211. OG Carl Johnson, Florida 6-5, 355
A huge prospect for Florida, literally, he’s the type of massive blocker missing in this draft. In a world of lighter, quicker guards, Johnson is a blaster who beats up defenders and can put them into the ground. However, he’s extremely slow, will never get out of the phone booth, and makes way too many mistakes. There’s a major question mark about his smarts and his character, but he has the raw bulk that’ll make him hard to cut. Someone will take a flier on him in the middle of the draft hoping to turn him into a major player.
CFN Projection: Fifth Round

212. DT Cedric Thornton, Southern Arkansas 6-3, 309
While he played at Southern Arkansas, his stats are still eye-popping coming up with a Ndamukong Suh-like 132 tackles, 36.5 tackles for loss, and ten sacks in his last 18 games. That’s the last time he’ll be compared to the Detroit Lion star. Thornton needs a ton of work on his technique after getting by on sheer bulk and shocking quickness. Players with his size and raw skills don’t come around all that often, and someone will be extremely happy to get him, but he’s not a nose tackle and needs to be a 3-technique defender after a year or three of developing. With patience, the upside is tremendous.
CFN Projection: Fourth Round

213. WR Darvin Adams, Auburn 6-2, 190 (Jr.)
While he was a big-play deep target for Cam Newton last year, and a good pass catcher two years ago setting the Auburn record for grabs, he doesn’t have much NFL speed and he’s too lanky to be physical on the short-to-midrange routes. He’s not going to come up with the home runs he was able to last year, and he’ll drop too many passes to be reliable on key downs. In other words, he has to show one thing he can do really well at an NFL level. CFN Projection: Fourth Round

214. QB Taylor Potts, Texas Tech 6-4, 216
It’s not saying much, but Potts is expected to be the best pro prospect out of all the recent stat-sheet fillers from Texas Tech. He has excellent size and an accurate arm, and he knows how to spread the ball around. However, he’s not going to put the ball on a line down the field and needs to be in the right system. The raw tools are better than they might appear, but he’ll have a tough time being anything more than a backup.
CFN Projection: Free Agent

215. DT Sione Fua, Stanford 6-2, 308
The definition of a mauler, he doesn’t miss plays against the run and he doesn’t get shoved around by anyone. With surprising quickness to go along with his toughness and fighting spirit, he’ll be loved by a coaching staff and might only be scratching the surface on his talent. While he’s strong enough hold his own, he can disappear for stretches and is too easily blocked. He’ll show enough to be the last man on a roster … or the last man cut.
CFN Projection: Sixth Round

216. ILB Mike Mohamed, California 6-3, 239
A pure baller, Mohamed made a ton of good tackles for the Bears with smarts, toughness, and the instincts to always be around the ball. However, he’s never going to come up with the big pop, and he’s not really an impact performer. While he’s not an elite athlete, he moves well enough to get by, and he makes up for any lack of quickness by being in the right spot at the right time. He doesn’t have the high-end skills to be great and isn’t going to be much of a factor against the pass.
CFN Projection: Fifth Round

217. ILB Greg Lloyd, Connecticut 6-1, 246
An undersized tackler who was a great leader for a strong UConn run defense, Lloyd is a good ball player who seems to like getting physical against the stronger running teams and is a great hitter. However, he hasn’t been the same since suffering a major knee injury and he’s not consistent. The tools are close, but they’re not quite there at an NFL level. Even so, he manages to get in on every play and he’ll be good on pure rushing downs.
CFN Projection: Sixth Round

218. DE Ugo Chinasa, Oklahoma State 6-5, 264
Very tall and very athletic, he’s a pure pass rusher who should be a situational star. Forget about using him as an outside linebacker, and forget about using him as a run defender, but he’ll always bring his lunchpail and he’ll close extremely well. While he was a good college player, he wasn’t a great one and didn’t do quite enough to suggest that he’ll be better once he makes the jump up at the next level. However, if he’s a specialist, he could be a whale of a third down pass rusher.
CFN Projection: Sixth Round

219. DT Adrian Taylor, Oklahoma 6-3, 311
Extremely strong and with the right size, the measureables are all there to be a dream of an anchor on the nose. He tries to do the right thing, is extremely coachable, and wants to work to be great. With the tools along with the want-to, he has plenty of upside. The problem is that he might not have any legs left. Had he gotten through his career healthy, the sky would’ve been the limit, but he missed way too much time over the last few years with an Achilles injury knocking him out last year. The tools and attitude are there to give him a long look, and he’ll make a team, but he’ll have a short shelf life.
CFN Projection: Seventh Round

220. DE Markus White, Florida State 6-4, 266
Very quick for his size and with great character, he’s the type of player a coach wants to have around. Always working and always bringing positive energy, he’s a leader who doesn’t take a play off and wants to be better. Unfortunately, he suffers from seizures and is missing the NFL athleticism to be anything more than a very good backup, but with all his intangibles he should be a long-time reserve. It would be nice if he was stronger against the run, and it would be great if he was a more creative pass rusher, but he’ll have to settle for being a hard-working part of a rotation.
CFN Projection: Sixth Round

221. ILB Alex Wujciak, Maryland 6-3, 247
Forget about the measurables. He’s not bulky enough, he’s too slow, and he’s not nearly athletic enough. Even so, he eats up everything against the run with the toughness to sit in the middle of someone’s linebacking corps and produce. Forget about him against the pass and he’s always hurt, but he plays 100 miles per hour and he’ll do whatever is needed to make a team and be a factor as long as he’s in the right system.
CFN Projection: Free Agent

222. OG Keith Williams, Nebraska 6-5, 318 (C)
A good-sized prospect who can slip in at center and handle himself well, he has the body and he’s not afraid to use it to provide a big push for the ground game, but he doesn’t look the part in drills. He doesn’t move well, it take him forever to get out of his stance, and he struggled in off-season workouts.
CFN Projection: Free Agent

223. DT Colby Whitlock, Texas Tech 6-2, 302
Productive and the key to the Texas Tech line over the last few years, he’s built for the inside with the leverage to hold firm against anyone. The lack of NFL athleticism will limit his potential, and he’ll almost never get into the backfield at the next level. Effort is never a problem and he was consistently good to make some scouts love the film enough to make him a part of the rotation, but he’s not going to be a starter and he’s not going to make a major impact.
CFN Projection: Seventh Round

224. C Jason Kelce, Cincinnati (OG) 6-3, 284
While he’s not huge and he’s not going to blast away, he’s one of the best athletes of all the center prospects. In the right offense he could become a decent guard who gets to the second level without a problem. He moves tremendously well and he is a bust-tail type of player who’ll do whatever he has to. The lack of bulk and size will be a problem and he’ll never be a mainstay, but he’s versatile enough to make a roster as a key backup.
CFN Projection: Sixth Round

225. WR Demarco Sampson, San Diego State 6-2, 204
With decent size and just enough speed to get by, he has nice tools and he knows how to use them to get open. A fighter, he catches anything close to him and he’ll battle to come up with the key catch, but he’s not going to do much of anything for the ground game and he’s always banged up. The biggest problem is his age, about to turn 26, and he’ll have a short shelf life. He’ll be just good enough to really, really want to keep around, but not talented enough to spend too much time off the practice squad.
CFN Projection:
Free Agent

226. FB Henry Hynoski, Pitt 6-2, 257
Very big and very tough, he’s a beat-‘em-up blocker who’ll be a great bodyguard for a smallish runner. With good hands, he could move to H-Back or tight end, and he’s versatile enough to move around where needed. With great character, he’ll work to be a good football player. He’ll never handle the ball and he’s not a goal line runner, and he’s not athletic enough to be a top-shelf H-Back. While he’ll be good at a lot of things, he won’t be great at anything but blocking for the ground game.
CFN Projection: Fifth Round

227. QB Jerrod Johnson, Texas A&M 6-5, 251
With the right height, the right arm, the right smarts, and the right mobility, Johnson has all the physical tools, and with the way he handled his demotion last year, he showed he has the character to be a great NFL backup. He wants to be great, and he’ll always be ready whenever called on; you want him to succeed. However, his mechanics are sketchy and he doesn’t seem to throw the same ball twice. It’s a bit too harsh to say he lost his confidence last year, but he didn’t make the decisive throws he should’ve for a player of his experience.
CFN Projection: Free Agent

228. RB Damien Berry, Miami 5-11, 212
While not fast and with an array of leg injuries throughout his career going back to high school, Berry isn’t going to be expected to be a workhorse of a No. 1 back. However, he’s a decent, physical runner and he’s not afraid to do the little things needed to help a team. He’ll block, he’ll work on special teams, and he’ll get a team the hard yards. Not a gifted runner and without much in the way of outside speed, he doesn’t have the athleticism to be a back to work around. He’ll be a tough cut.
CFN Projection: Free Agent

229. FB Shaun Chapas, Georgia 6-2, 247
A good athlete who can get out on the edge and make a big block, he could be a nice receiver with a little bit of time and will fill a variety of roles. A willing blocker who doesn’t make mistakes and is always going full tilt, but he’s not a blaster of a blocker and he’s not going to open up any huge holes. He’s a finesse fullback who won’t be for everyone.
CFN Projection: Fifth Round

230. TE Charlie Gantt, Michigan State 6-4, 252
No one’s expecting him to be a field stretcher, but his lack of speed is a problem. While he’s not all that huge, he’s big enough to be a tough blocker who hangs around as a first down blocking option. Extremely strong, he destroyed the bench at the Combine with 27 reps and he should be a tough blood-and-guts option in a tight end class of soft receiving types. The lack of athleticism might be a sticking point, and he’s certainly limited, but he could be a luxury item for a power offense.
CFN Projection: Free Agent

231. QB Tyrod Taylor, Virginia Tech 6-1, 217
Height, height, height. Other than Drew Brees, find a current NFL quarterback who struggles to measure past six feet tall and is a success. Taylor is a very tough, very good leader who runs extremely well, and he improved in a big way from when he came to Virginia Tech as nothing more than a pure athlete. He’s the type of high-character quarterback who would be a great main man for a franchise, but he simply doesn’t have NFL quarterback skills. No, he’s not a receiver.
CFN Projection: Sixth Round

232. FS Tejay Johnson, TCU 6-0, 212
A great leader on a terrific defense, that might not have been his Horned Frog D over the last few years, but that sure as shoot was his secondary. Very experienced and very smart, he could become a whale of a nickel or dime back with the smarts and the toughness to always be in the right position. He’s not a great hitter and he’s not going to do quite enough against the pass, but he’s a better football player than an athlete and he’ll be able to hold his own without a problem.
CFN Projection: Free Agent

233. OLB Adrian Moten, Maryland 6-2, 228
Way too small, Moten’s a good athlete with nice quickness and great fire. A screamer, he’s a high-energy player who likes to get everyone pumped up and is a natural leader. However, he doesn’t have the size and the bulk or the strength to be a regular starter. He looks more like a safety than a pure linebacker, and he might be limited, but he could be a superstar on special teams and too versatile to cut.
CFN Projection: Free Agent

234. ILB Josh Bynes, Auburn 6-1, 239
A smart, veteran leader who saw it all and did it all at a high SEC level. While he’s not thick, he has enough size to hold up against the run on a regular basis. He makes up for his lack of speed and athleticism by always going full tilt, but it’s not enough. WAY slow, he didn’t look good in offseason workouts, doesn’t move well enough to play on the outside, and he’s not a factor in pass coverage.
CFN Projection: Free Agent

235. SS David Sims, Iowa State 5-9, 200
Made a ton of plays for the Cyclones as a statistical machine who cleaned up mess after mess, he’s a terrific tackler who’s great at coming up with the right plays at the right time. Strong, he’s like a linebacker playing safety and can jump out of the stadium. A pure leader, there won’t be any questioning his desire or his want-to. However, he’s about to turn 25 and has about a three-inch ceiling on what he can become. He’s not great in pass defense and he doesn’t move as well as he should considering his terrific athleticism. If all he’s asked to do is stop the run, he’ll be effective. Anything else and he’ll be a disappointment.
CFN Projection: Sixth Round

236. WR Jeff Maehl, Oregon 6-1, 190
There’s no NFL talent whatsoever, he too slow in the 40, he’s too thin, and he can’t lift a weight, but he’s a decent athlete who cuts well and has phenomenal hands. Always open – ALWAYS open – and always coming up with the big play needed, everyone will want him for the practice squad. While he’s not big and looks like he should get shoved around, he gets into the second level well and he finds the holes. On the right team he could become a quarterback’s best friend.
CFN Projection:
Free Agent

237. WR Denarius Moore, Tennessee 6-0, 194
The tools are there, but he’s just not that good a football player. He has decent size and phenomenal speed, he could make a team in a Donte Stallworth sort of way and become a deep threat who makes a few huge plays a year. With his wheels, though, he should play far faster and he doesn’t explode like he should. There’s something missing from his game and he isn’t a good enough football player, but he could be dangerous if he can harness his potential and grow into a better route runner.
CFN Projection:
Sixth Round

238. OT Josh Davis, Georgia 6-7, 313
Very big and very long, he’s a decent pass protector on his frame alone and he pushes hard for the ground game. He’ll always bring the effort and he’ll always work, but he’s simply not that good a football player. Always banged up, not physical enough, and too slow, he’ll battle for a spot, but he won’t be anything more than a very big backup.
CFN Projection: Free Agent

239. RB Vai Taua, Nevada 5-10, 213
Great in space and with the ball on the move, he was ultra-productive in the Nevada Pistol attack finds ways to gain the extra yards after contact. Physical, he’ll block and he’ll run between the tackles and will take shots. He doesn’t punish defenders, though, and he absorbs shots more than he runs over people. He doesn’t have the hands to be a reliable receiver, and he might get booted out of a camp instantly is he’s struggling with fumbling problems, but he was too good for the Wolf Pack and has enough pure running skills to not get an honest look as a No. 2 back.
CFN Projection: Free Agent

240. WR Jock Sanders, West Virginia 5-6, 181
Really, REALLY small, Sanders will have to make it as a return man or he’ll be a quick and easy cut. Tough to find when he gets behind his blockers, he’s able to get lost and then cut and fly for a big play. Character is a problem, he’s not durable, and he’s way too slow for a player of his size. However, he’s a good enough football player – as opposed to being an athlete – to become an interesting part of an offensive scheme. He’s a weapon who’ll come up with some big plays here and there.
CFN Projection:
Free Agent

241. RB Johnny White, North Carolina, 5-10, 209
With a nice base and cut-on-a-dime quickness, he’s a natural runner who gets around the cones in a hurry. He flew under the ACC radar and was never considered a star, but always did a nice job and he always gave a good effort. Not necessarily a special runner and without the raw speed to work on the outside on a regular basis, but he could turn into a sneaky-good pro with his great attitude and tough style. Every time he gets the ball he’ll make positive yards, but he’ll be nothing more than a cog.
CFN Projection: Fifth Round

242. TE Schuylar Oordt, Northern Iowa 6-6, 261
With his combination of size, speed, and athleticism, he has the raw tools to make him a good enough prospect to take a flier on. While he’s too old, about to turn 24, he’s a receiver; the former wideout who bulked up enough to be a potentially dangerous option. The workout at the Combine was fantastic, but he has to get stronger to be in the hunt for starting time.
CFN Projection: Sixth Round

243. QB Ryan Colburn, Fresno State 6-3, 223
He might be just good enough to be a late cut. He has decent size and a good enough arm to get by, and he’s a pro-style passer who can step in and look the part at times. The lefty throws a good deep ball with touch, but he sprays his throws too much and can’t do much of anything whenever there’s a pass rush. He’ll be a good practice player who’ll be lousy when he gets his chance in the preseason.
CFN Projection: Free Agent

244. C Chase Beeler, Stanford 6-2, 276
Purely a zone-blocking, finesse-option technician, he was a strong collegiate run blocker who lacks the pure bulk to do much in the pros. He’s always moving and always working to make the key block, and he doesn’t make mistakes. His lack of size, though, is a deal-breaker and he doesn’t have any room to get bigger. He deserves a long look, but he might never be more than a good backup.
CFN Projection: Free Agent

245. WR Ryan Whalen, Stanford 6-1, 202
There’s absolutely nothing about his game that makes him an NFL player, but he catches everything and is great at doing whatever is needed to get his nose dirty. He’s smart, he blocks, and he’ll run any route asked of him. There’s little to no NFL speed and he doesn’t make anything big happen when the ball is in his hands. He could be someone’s slot receiver, but he’ll be an easy cut if he ever drops a ball.
CFN Projection:
Free Agent

246. QB Jeff Van Camp, Florida Atlantic 6-5, 218
Purely a tools prospect, he’s extremely tall, has a great arm, and he moves well for his size. While he didn’t get to air it out too much, he gets the ball down the field and has the smarts to know what he’s doing; he’s always going to be prepared. However, he needs to work on his throwing motion and he struggles way too much to consistently hit the target in stride. He’s just not accurate enough.
CFN Projection: Free Agent

247. C Zane Taylor, Utah (OG) 6-2, 309
A terrific collegiate player, he always took control and was the leader of some great lines. He’s extremely strong, a great run blocker, and will be great in short spaces, but he’s not going to do anything whatsoever on the move. Get him out of the phone booth and forget about it. While he might end up being a guard, he has to be in the right system. Anyone with a zone-blocking scheme won’t work.
CFN Projection: Free Agent

248. TE Cameron Graham, Louisville 6-3, 244
For a player with his lack of size, the 5.09 at the Combine might have been a deal-breaker. He blocks well for his size and he’s always willing to do whatever is needed, and he’s a good receiver, but he’s not a good enough athlete and he’s way too thin and way too inconsistent when the ball comes his way. A much better football player than a workout warrior, he’ll be good in a camp, but not good enough to have any shot of starting.
CFN Projection: Seventh Round

249. TE Jordan Cameron, USC 6-5, 254
The athleticism isn’t a question mark after coming up with a fantastic Combine, and now the former basketball player will be worth developing. He’s tall enough to pack on the pounds, but only if he’s able to keep his leaping ability and his tremendous speed. With only 16 career catches and just one start, he’s an athlete and not a football player. He’s got a lot to learn and forget about him blocking anyone for a power running game.
CFN Projection: Fifth Round

250. FS Mark LeGree, Appalachian State 5-11, 210
A tremendous ball-hawk, he could be a very cheap pickup who could shine as a fifth defensive back or a top nickel defender. He’s not an elite athlete and he doesn’t do anything against the run, but he has some of the best ball skills of any safety in the draft intercepting everything that came his way. A tweener, he’s not going to hit well enough to be a strong safety and he’s not a blazer who can start at free safety and not be exposed. He’ll sit in the middle of a secondary and he’ll pick off plenty of passes on lazy throws, but he won’t be around long if he’s not on the field on third downs and if he’s not great on special teams.
CFN Projection: Free Agent

251. TE Daniel Hardy, Idaho 6-4, 249
A good athlete and a strong receiver who moves well and is a willing blocker, he has just enough skills to get a long look in a camp. Not big enough to be an effective NFL blocker, and too slow to become a downfield danger, he’s extremely limited and is still trying to figure out how to become consistent player. There’s upside, but he needs time and coaching. He might not get either one.
CFN Projection: Seventh Round

252. SS Nate Williams, Washington 6-0, 211
He’s just too slow. While he’s a terrific tackler, and he seemed to always get in on every play against the run, he doesn’t move well enough to be on an NFL field on passing downs. He’s a great pure football player, but he ran close to a 4.8 at the Combine and he just doesn’t seem to be quick enough to hang with any receiver. Yes, he was a great college player, but his skills just don’t translate to the pros. He has to be used close to the line and he has to be a pure run defender. Anything else and he’ll get picked apart.
CFN Projection: Free Agent.

253. SS Da'Norris Searcy, North Carolina 5-11, 223
With great size and excellent strength, he has the raw ability to be a great strong safety against the run … potentially. He came up with 27 reps on the bench and he checked in at a huge 223 pounds, but he’s not all that athletic and he didn’t make nearly enough plays in college. Not good against the pass and he doesn’t move as well as he should for a player who can return kicks, but he’s always around the ball; he just isn’t the one making the stop. With a great make-up and coachable character, he’ll do whatever is asked of him and could be a tough cut. He’ll work hard on special teams to stick on a squad … barely.
CFN Projection: Fifth Round

254. TE Allen Reisner, Iowa 6-2, 248
While he’s not all that fast and he isn’t all that athletic, he’s a nice receiver who grew into a decent prospect last year and is worth a longer look. A solid blocker, he’s good at getting down the field and he’s nice for the ground game. Way undersized, he’s not going to be able to hold up and he isn’t a good enough receiver to make up for his lack of size, but he’ll be good if he can get stronger.
CFN Projection: Fourth Round