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State of the Game 2011 - How To Stop Cheating
Former Ohio State head coach Jim Tressel
Former Ohio State head coach Jim Tressel
CollegeFootballNews.com
Posted Aug 21, 2011


Fixing the scandals, Cam Newton, the Longhorn Network, and more. Along with the CFNers, check out the opinions on key topics going into the season from Matt Hayes from the Sporting News and the Chicago Tribune's Teddy Greenstein.


State of the Game

How To Stop The Cheating


2011 CFN State of the Game Topics  
- Should The Death Penalty Be On The Table? 
- What One Thing Can Stop The Cheating? | Bloggers Analysis
- How To Fix The NCAA | Bloggers Analysis
- Is There Institutional Control? | Bloggers Analysis
- The Cam Newton Situation | Bloggers Analysis
Was Stanley McClover Telling The Truth? | Bloggers Analysis
Should Players Get a Bigger Stipend? | Bloggers Analysis
- Should a one-loss SEC team play for it all? | Bloggers Analysis
- Why isn't there a playoff? | Bloggers Analysis
- The Programs About To Blow Up | Bloggers Analysis
- Does The Longhorn Network Matter? | Bloggers Analysis
- What'll Happen In Ten Years? | Bloggers Analysis
- When Should Players Turn Pro? | Bloggers Analysis
- What's Your Beef? The Biggest Complaints | Bloggers Analysis

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Pete Fiutak

Kennisaw Mountain Landis this thing.

How did he clean up baseball after the Black Sox scandal? He dropped a hammer on the offending players by saying that any player who associated with gamblers would never be a part of baseball again. If the NCAA really wants to clean things up, it would make a rule that any coach of a program that got caught breaking major violations could never work in college football again and would be banned for life - and no, a player getting a few hundred dollars from an agent  doesn't count.

Don't believe for a single, solitary second that head coaches don't know 99% of everything that's going on with their programs. Any time you hear a player was suspended for "violation of team rules," that's a coach flexing his muscle to show who's boss - and it almost always means the player either didn't go to class, was smoking pot, or didn't go to class because he was smoking pot. And the things the head coaches don't know, the assistants do.

If you put the onus on the coaches to run a squeaky clean program, he'll rule with a iron fist, would make sure - very, very sure - that he's recruiting players who aren't going to screw things up, and more than anything else, he'll make sure the NCAA knows about any possible issues the second they happen; no more Jim Tressel hiding e-mails.

The NCAA, for its part, would have to do a better job than it currently does of working with the programs and the coaches. As long as the coaches report any possible violations immediately, to the point of doing it the second the precogs to deliver their vision to the precrime unit, the NCAA could work with situation. Anything else, though, and the coach gets hit with the career version of the death penalty.

By Matt Hayes
Sporting News


Zero tolerance. And I mean, zero. You break an NCAA rule, you lose your eligibility — for good. No second, third or fourth chances. The NFL doesn’t want 18- or 19-year-olds who haven’t been “seasoned” (see: physical growth; football IQ growth). High school players these days care about one thing: getting to the NFL. Put a serious crimp in those possibilities if you make a mistake, and watch how fast cheating is controlled.

By Teddy Greenstein
Chicago Tribune


Ask Reggie Bush to record a public-service announcement that every school will show to its players each month. Try to get them to believe that it’s just not worth it to cheat and tarnish your legacy. (But keep in mind, kids, if you do take money from a marketing guy/agent slimeball, pay him back before he runs to the media.)

By Richard Cirminiello

Allow athletes to capitalize on their celebrity. No one is going to “eliminate” cheating. It’s just not possible when a cocktail of money, power, teenagers and questionable adults are mixed together. It can, however, be mollified if the NCAA is ever willing to relax its rules a bit. Part of the issue in amateur athletics is that many of the participants lack funds for the basics. While no panacea, why shouldn’t student-athletes be able to monetize their talents and notoriety through sanctioned events, such as camps, appearances and autograph shows? There’s a market there, which could provide much-needed spending money for the kids, without the schools dipping into already strained budgets.

By Matt Zemek

Go big if you get just one wish from a college sports genie. My “ONE thing” would be to allow football and basketball players (women’s basketball included) to sign with schools as “football” or “basketball” majors with no requirements to study other courses. “Majoring in football” or basketball would involve agents coming to classrooms to talk about financial management and related topics. Representatives from companies in the athletic-industrial complex would provide lectures and courses on media relations, the science of pharmacology, sports medicine, setting up charitable foundations, and other things that would-be professional athletes should be trained to do. Society would benefit from it, and so would the athletes themselves.

Let’s liberate big-ticket athletes who are interested in careers as athletes or sports broadcasters. However, this act of liberation should bring agents – and other people currently in the shadows of college sports – into the bright sunlight of transparency and accountability. Let agents be educators. Train athletes to be athletes not just in terms of the weight room or the practice field, but in terms of the off-field and at-home obligations they might have when they start families and, ultimately, end their playing careers. Such a systemic shift will in one sense strip away the veneer of amateurism, but in another sense, it will renew it: Sports will be a subject of classroom teaching with an ultimate focus on the whole human person’s lifelong goals, hopes and needs. The NCAA currently presides over a system that incentivizes shadowy and secretive behavior. Let’s do something to incentivize transparency and, even more so, holistic education. Yeah, holistic education – what our universities are ostensibly supposed to provide young people in the first place. What a concept, right?

By Barrett Sallee
Follow me on Twitter: @BarrettSallee

Magically staff the NCAA with 10,000 more bodies and 5,000 interns. Aside from that, there’s not much else that can be done to eliminate cheating.

By Russ Mitchell
Follow me on Twitter @russmitchellcfb

What kind of cheating? Coaches cheating? Boosters cheating? Or players? Two of the three answers involve money, and thus will never be enacted.

Stopping boosters is easy...They crave the bright lights. If caught, cut off their sun. Forever, and a day. Ostracize them in the process. Sure, they have the money, but isolated they're just one fundraiser. Truly cull them from the program - no future contact for life. Until you actually do it, no booster will take it seriously.

But this is rife with problems - how do you weigh infractions? How do you judge? What recourse will boosters have? What legal exposure could schools open themselves to? A can of worms almost as big as the problem itself.

With respect to players, absent the extreme situations (Miami), it's typically just those players with legitimate NFL opportunity that have the money boosters around them and are being tempted to cheat. Again, it's mostly about money - the potential of a small fine later when I'm making a fat contract won't stop me from cheating now when I have nothing. Particularly given the small likelihood of exposure.

To really stop players from cheating, the NCAA must work with the NFL to require punishment after the fact that's clear and compelling - a year suspension. The League already does this with agents - sorta. And it saddled ex-Buckeye Terrelle Pryor with a five game suspension along these lines.

But an idea like this is bound to be challenged in the courts, not to mention also being rife with obstacles in comparing/weighting one act of cheating to another. Right now the NCAA rarely deals with player agents/lawyers. Let's see how far this idea goes when million dollar athletes and their bevy of $500/hr lawyers, wanting to protect future earning potential, start peeling at the NCAA edges.

As to the coaches...again absent dismissal, money is the only deterrent. Start fining coaches directly for Secondary and Primary infractions. Start doubling those fines if they failed to notify their compliance office. Make suspensions have teeth - if you're going to force A.J. Green to sit for four games for selling his own shirt on eBay, make a 50 year old coach sit for four games (with no pay) for infractions of equal weight.

Just don't hold your breath.

2011 CFN State of the Game Topics  
- Should The Death Penalty Be On The Table? 
- What One Thing Can Stop The Cheating? | Bloggers Analysis
- How To Fix The NCAA | Bloggers Analysis
- Is There Institutional Control? | Bloggers Analysis
- The Cam Newton Situation | Bloggers Analysis
Was Stanley McClover Telling The Truth? | Bloggers Analysis
Should Players Get a Bigger Stipend? | Bloggers Analysis
- Should a one-loss SEC team play for it all? | Bloggers Analysis
- Why isn't there a playoff? | Bloggers Analysis
- The Programs About To Blow Up | Bloggers Analysis
- Does The Longhorn Network Matter? | Bloggers Analysis
- What'll Happen In Ten Years? | Bloggers Analysis
- When Should Players Turn Pro? | Bloggers Analysis
- What's Your Beef? The Biggest Complaints | Bloggers Analysis

LIMITED TIME ONLY: CLICK HERE for a Free Week of Top-Rated Selections

- Suggestions or something we missed? Let us know
- Follow us ... http://twitter.com/ColFootballNews