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Bloggers - How To Stop The Cheating

CollegeFootballNews.com
Posted Aug 21, 2011


From the CFN bloggers, here are their thoughts on all the important topics going into the 2011 college football season.


State of the Game - Bloggers

How To Stop The Cheating

 
2011 CFN State of the Game Topics  
- Should The Death Penalty Be On The Table? 
- What One Thing Can Stop The Cheating? | Bloggers Analysis
- How To Fix The NCAA | Bloggers Analysis
- Is There Institutional Control? | Bloggers Analysis
- The Cam Newton Situation | Bloggers Analysis
Was Stanley McClover Telling The Truth? | Bloggers Analysis
Should Players Get a Bigger Stipend? | Bloggers Analysis
- Should a one-loss SEC team play for it all? | Bloggers Analysis
- Why isn't there a playoff? | Bloggers Analysis
- The Programs About To Blow Up | Bloggers Analysis
- Does The Longhorn Network Matter? | Bloggers Analysis
- What'll Happen In Ten Years? | Bloggers Analysis
- When Should Players Turn Pro? | Bloggers Analysis
- What's Your Beef? The Biggest Complaints | Bloggers Analysis

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1. If you could do one thing to change the entire system in an attempt to eliminate cheating, what would you do? 


By David Sweigart
Rewriting the NCAA rule book would be the first order of business. The goal here is to clearly define what the rules are as well as the penalty for breaking said rule. The next step is to enforce the rulings with an iron fist and in a timely fashion. Get caught breaking a rule – deal with the penalty. The rules have to be clearly defined and the loopholes that exist need to be closed. The rule book should also be constantly updated with new rules and regulations that arise. The risk and fear of breaking the rules has to outweigh the benefit of breaking the rules in order to eliminate cheating.

By Gabe Harris
To eliminate cheating in college football a sea change would have to happen that would cause the mother of all growing pains: a zero tolerance policy. If you accept money or illegal benefits then you forfeit your eligibility. Period. End of story. That means if you are a freshman then you can no longer play college football and would have to wait two years until you are NFL eligible. Good luck getting drafted after not having played football for two years. This would scare straight any would be money grabbers.

By Phil Harrison
That’s a lot like asking how to keep people from speeding. The reality is, you don’t unless you totally eliminate the definition of speeding. As long as there are rules, they will continue to be stretched, twisted, and flat out broken. That being said, the NCAA needs to be given more legal power than what they have today if they’re going to smoke out the rumors and hearsay. Under the current model, if a player doesn’t want to cooperate, he isn’t obligated to do anything. Without any kind of cooperation the NCAA is powerless to mount any evidence. Without evidence, there is no case, and the result is a slap on the wrists of offending programs. It is surely a pie in the sky idea, but dream big, right?

By Terry Johnson
The NCAA needs to make the penalties for violations so severe that people will not think twice about breaking the rules. For example, the NCAA should have banned Jim Tressel from all college football related activities for ten years for failing to report rules violations to the Ohio State administrators. This includes attending college football games, working for Fox Sports, or serving in any other type of capacity affiliated with college football. Would any college football coach even think about withholding information if it meant being away from the game for a significant length of time?

By Justin Hendricks
It’s going to take a lot more than one thing to clean up the game, but the first thing I’d do is focus on is hitting the cheaters where it’ll hurt: their wallets. As it stands now, schools are punished with suspensions, vacated wins, vacated titles - it’s primarily symbolic. It doesn’t erase what happened on or off the field, and it doesn’t deter it from happening again. Fines - for the school and for the personnel involved whether they’re administrators, coaches, or players - could make it more trouble than its worth to cheat. Schools that have to forfeit income earned while cheating, on top of paying a steep fine, would have less incentive to cheat, and while college athletes who desperately need money will always be susceptible to those willing to give them handouts, it might be a lot harder for money and other improper benefits to change hands if the schools have a bigger stake in maintaining vigilance for the sake of their bottom line.

By Bart Doan
I’m a bit outside the box with this, but having been a college athlete I’ll pretend I have some sort of fake authority. I’d allow contact with agents/companies the last year of a player’s tenure in school contingent on a 3.0 GPA and a 90% attendance rate at class. Reason? It’s pretty simple. Find any other college kid (including those on academic scholarship) that is told by his university that he can’t seek employment until after he graduates. You can’t. Collegians are routinely encouraged to find jobs well BEFORE they get out of school. And since these athletes already have a potential job waiting for them, how about letting them actually pursue it? I’d institute a course taught by FORMER agents and professional athletes willing to teach it, that allows players in their junior year who meet the attendance and GPA criteria to take said course to learn the pitfalls of dealing with agents and being a professional athlete straight from the horse’s mouth instead of them being told by the NCAA they have 1 month to get their life in order, or risk ineligibility/their program being put on probation for what they did. Student-athletes need to be educated, not just told “no” like an infant and given no reason why they can’t pursue their own careers like all other non-athlete college students. Put a system in place that allows this to happen based on effort level? You can’t lose.

By Bradley Simoneaux
As disgusting as it is, college football and major college sports in general will always be marred by cheating scandals. Continually vacating past wins and providing short-term scholarship reductions will never fix the problem. Schools and former players and coaches need to be hit where it hurts the most, their wallets. The NCAA should fine all schools involved a significant amount of money, and the death penalty needs to be instituted on a more regular basis for penalty lengths of at least one season. Only when schools are losing money, coaches are not paid, and players are not allowed to play the game will we see any substantive changes in college athletics.

By Randall Gyorko
I’ve got to think the only way to curb this behavior is for jobs to be affected. If you’re caught cheating, you lose your job and you are banned from working in this capacity ever again. I’d imagine coach’s would think twice about their laissez faire attitude if they knew their job and their ability to support their family was in jeopardy. You have to hit people hard and where it hurts. Most effectively, hit them in their bank account. To expand, the school’s should be fined a hefty amount if found guilty of the dreaded “Lack of Institutional Control” moniker. Otherwise, a slap on the wrist is what the sanctions are for the guilty parties. You know the effects of slap on the wrist. I won’t reach into the cookie jar while you’re standing here watching me, but as soon as you walk into the living room, I’m gorging myself with Oreos.

By Jon Berke
I’m of the opinion that, sadly, permitting players to be paid will by no means prevent any sort of cheating – it will only move the barometer for what we consider to be impermissible. I do think that players deserve some compensation beyond what they now receive, but I don’t think it’ll stop cheating.

What I DO think has the chance to make a difference is giving the NCAA some level of subpoena power against all FBS schools. I know, I know – fat chance, right? However, there is an opportunity here with many schools looking to restructure their conference agreements. If the NCAA was able to step in, perhaps they could and somehow use the changing national landscape to add in their own new demands in return for D-1 participation. Perhaps they could create a requirement that schools give them significant wherewithal to demand normally-protected information, which is currently the biggest road block to overseeing these institutions.

Witness several high-profile compliance cases of recent note: the Bush “investigation” took a half-decade because USC wasn’t particularly co-operative, and much of what did come out was greatly assisted by the Lloyd Lake lawsuit. ‘Tatgate’ only came out because of the police’s investigation, combined with an unscrupulous lawyer. Miami’s recent issues with Nevin Shapiro went unnoticed for nearly a decade until he got himself in trouble with the law.

Schools have no incentive to police themselves, as a “hear-no-evil see-no-evil” philosophy tends to reap great rewards. But without any real legal teeth, the NCAA can’t realistically investigate these various potential violations. Somehow giving them that power would go a long way towards de-incentivizing potential cheaters.

By Nico Roesler
In order to eliminate cheating, everybody needs to be held accountable for their actions. There needs to be harsh penalties for infractions that give unfair advantages in recruiting or putting players on the field at every school. Cheating is inspired by the feeling that you can get away with it. For too long, cheating in college athletics has gotten away from punishment. The NCAA needs to overhaul their system so that if an infraction is committed, the punishment is known immediately. None of this waffling about to determine which punishment fits best and does the least damage to revenues.

By Marc Basham
College football has seemingly hit a crossroads in recent years thanks to the multitude of allegations affecting dozens of top level Division I programs. From the Terrell Pryor scandal at Ohio State, which cost arguably one the most successful and knowledgeable coaches in the game his position, all the way down to the clothing scandal at Georgia Tech and every conceivable issue in between, the NCAA, at its own fault, has placed an inordinate amount of pressure on the college football landscape. From this, the game of college football has entered a legal realm so convoluted it makes the NFL Lockout look like an episode of “Franklin and Bash.” While scandal continues to plague the system, and the NCAA maintains an inconsistent response to repeat offenders, it has become obvious that change is necessary to eliminate these issues. However, the only way that can be done in a complete manner is by paying the athletes, and that just opens up a whole new can of worms into collegiate athletics. While it would solve the issues to an extent, a combination of low athletic department revenue, possible legal ramifications from student athletes in other sports receiving less, if anything in comparison, and our old friend Title IX makes this option pretty implausible at the moment. For now college football fans, our only hope is to kick back, ride out the storm and hope reform to the rules and regulations are made.

By Matthew Peaslee
Scandals have long hindered the ethics of college football. It’s a culture that has shot itself in the foot, time after time, with no clear end in sight. Coaching shiftiness, unlawful booster aid and player infractions all add up to create a an evil nemesis against forthrightness. Penalties, such as probation, are almost always bestowed upon the program under scrutiny, but it doesn’t always stop other from committing similar infractions. Lies and dishonesty float around every top college team, it is impossible to curb those actions. The only way to make sure cheating in any form ceases to exist is to revaluate a school from top-to-bottom. As the eternal watchdog, the NCAA cannot fully control a program, but it can force legal mandates on its entities. In near audit form, teams should bulk up their brass of compliance officers and present an annual report to their respective conference and NCAA before, during and after the season.

By Brian Harbach
Corruption is unstoppable, whether it be draining the swamp in Congress or the SEC (the other SEC) trying to track down insider trading on Wall Street. Coaches can’t be with players 24/7 and if schools don’t know what their players are doing on campus how can they keep track of what is going on when they are home?

The only thing to do is punish those who get caught and send a strong message…but the kids will never get caught in the action, it will always be the after. That is why the Jim Tressel case is so interesting…he turned a blind eye towards cheating and was punished accordingly. The NCAA and Schools can’t control what these kids do but they can control what happens when the rules are ignored.

Punishing cases like Jim Tressel at Ohio State to the fullest extent possible won’t stop cheating but it will make coaches think twice about keeping their mouths shut. Maybe it even stops a player or two from being recruited because he had his hand out during the process. Coaches and Players are going to bend the rules because there is too much money involved not to. Tressel got paid to win games and Terrelle Pryor helped Ohio State wins games. Players are never going to turn down a free meal, 500 dollar handshake or a car because many feel ripped off by the whole process.

The NCAA will keep doing what it is doing, coaches will do the same as will the players…there is no end. The government has a better chance of stopping the war on drugs than NCAA does stopping rogue boosters from helping out student athletes.

2011 CFN State of the Game Topics  
- Should The Death Penalty Be On The Table? 
- What One Thing Can Stop The Cheating? | Bloggers Analysis
- How To Fix The NCAA | Bloggers Analysis
- Is There Institutional Control? | Bloggers Analysis
- The Cam Newton Situation | Bloggers Analysis
Was Stanley McClover Telling The Truth? | Bloggers Analysis
Should Players Get a Bigger Stipend? | Bloggers Analysis
- Should a one-loss SEC team play for it all? | Bloggers Analysis
- Why isn't there a playoff? | Bloggers Analysis
- The Programs About To Blow Up | Bloggers Analysis
- Does The Longhorn Network Matter? | Bloggers Analysis
- What'll Happen In Ten Years? | Bloggers Analysis
- When Should Players Turn Pro? | Bloggers Analysis
- What's Your Beef? The Biggest Complaints | Bloggers Analysis

LIMITED TIME ONLY: CLICK HERE for a Free Week of Top-Rated Selections

- Suggestions or something we missed? Let us know
- Follow us ... http://twitter.com/ColFootballNews