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CFN Bloggers - Fixing The NCAA

CollegeFootballNews.com
Posted Aug 21, 2011


From the CFN bloggers, here are their thoughts on all the important topics going into the 2011 college football season.


State of the Game - Bloggers 

How To Fix The NCAA


2011 CFN State of the Game Topics  
- Should The Death Penalty Be On The Table? 
- What One Thing Can Stop The Cheating? | Bloggers Analysis
- How To Fix The NCAA | Bloggers Analysis
- Is There Institutional Control? | Bloggers Analysis
- The Cam Newton Situation | Bloggers Analysis
Was Stanley McClover Telling The Truth? | Bloggers Analysis
Should Players Get a Bigger Stipend? | Bloggers Analysis
- Should a one-loss SEC team play for it all? | Bloggers Analysis
- Why isn't there a playoff? | Bloggers Analysis
- The Programs About To Blow Up | Bloggers Analysis
- Does The Longhorn Network Matter? | Bloggers Analysis
- What'll Happen In Ten Years? | Bloggers Analysis
- When Should Players Turn Pro? | Bloggers Analysis
- What's Your Beef? The Biggest Complaints | Bloggers Analysis

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By Phil Harrison
How do we define “fix”? College football has never been more popular so something is going right. You could argue that train wrecks sell, but too much drama could begin to turn fans away. I don’t believe anything exists under the current structure that can “fix” the sport. Without blowing the whole thing up and creating a new way of handling these issues, things will probably continue to happen at a rapid pace. The current program is obviously not working so it is time create a bold, new world. Let’s get a committee together to look at the issues, propose a more harsh reality, and set things in motion with new rules and laws.

By Marc Basham
Unfortunately for college football fans the NCAA rules are so confusing and detailed that one could make a violation out of almost anything. I'm sure every person reading this article who attended a university with a major athletics program has witnessed a violation in their time as a student. From having a fellow student to do homework to buying an athlete a beer at the bar, these moments, minor and common as they may be, are technically violations. And God forbid you actually became friends with a recognizable athlete. While the NCAA does not pursue incidents these minute, they are still there, and when issues crop up the words 'secondary violations' bring every little detail of a student athlete's life to the forefront. Now I'm not condoning cheating in or outside of the classroom, but is there really anyone out there that agrees wholeheartedly with the most nit-picky of the stringent rules outlined by the NCAA? Until the rules are changed to make compliance less of a player-focused witch hunt and place more emphasis on stopping the true wrongdoers at the source, these issues will continue to happen, regardless of what the NCAA reports.

By Bradlee Simoneaux
Under the current rules, the NCAA needs to set specific penalties regarding each type of infraction. The NCAA’s team of investigators also much move forward at a faster pace so as to actually punish the people committing the infractions. To punish teams five years later for something that previous coaches and players did is unreasonable and unethical.

By Nico Roesler
There needs to be a clear, uniform sense of accountability. There can no longer be instances where players and programs deemed guilty of a violation can compete in post season play, as with Ohio State. If the NCAA wants to be an organization respected for its adherence to the rules and regulations that define amateur play, they must step-up as the ultimate enforcer and not a money-making giant. If players are guilty of accepting illegal benefits, then suspend them. Do not allow them to play in a bowl game for the sake of competition (revenue). The rules are in place to create an environment of fairness and equality, but the sense of accountability is solid as Jell-O pudding. Create a uniform system of penalties and the NCAA’s rules and Laws will be more effective.

By Matthew Peaslee
Former Florida head coach Urban Meyer created much buzz recently with his comments surrounding the NCAA’s current state. He referred back to problems college football faced years ago with performance enhancing drugs. Now, steroids are just an afterthought in the college ranks. Those problems were fixed with a simple enforcement of the rules with stiff penalties following. Amid the allegations haunting teams today, the current rules of the NCAA need to be enforced heavily with strong penalties. Meyer insists that the only way to deter wrongful behavior is to establish a referendum painful enough to make sure it doesn’t happen again.

By Justine Hendricks
Honestly, the sport might not be able to be fixed under the current NCAA rules and laws. In light of the arbitrary rulings from the NCAA recently, the system as it is now seems like a joke, and if no one takes it seriously, no one’s going to follow its rules. To fix the sport, the NCAA has to come up with more uniform policies for punishing violations based on the scale of the infractions, and they need to stick with it, regardless of which bowl committees are arguing for players to maintain eligibility (see Ohio State, 2011 Sugar Bowl).

By Randall Gyorko
Under the current rules, nothing can be done (save from elaborating on my answer from Question #1). The NCAA can either wield a giant and swift sword, and they can take down everyone breaking the rules, or the schools can leave the governing body that is the NCAA and run rampant. People will say that the players should be paid, and that this will stop all the dealings going on. They are wrong. When have you ever known someone that says, “Yeah. That’s enough money for me. No thanks” when offered a pay increase? Not going to happen.

By Gabe Harris
The NCAA should focus on players who receive pay for play money and the really large problems instead of whether or not Nick Saban said “hey” to a high school player or Mark Richt accidentally pocket-dialed someone. This would make the respective university’s job easier and focus on policing their coaches for true wrongdoing.
 
By Terry Johnson
While some of the NCAA rules need to be rewritten, most of the existing rules and laws work. However, the NCAA needs to enforce the rules, and punish the rule breakers. Consider the Rhett Bomar case at Oklahoma. Bomar received compensation for working a full week’s work when he only worked a few hours. Despite this clear violation, no one received any type of stiff punishment. Oklahoma vacated eight wins, and lost two scholarships, but got off relatively scot-free. While Oklahoma dismissed Bomar, the NCAA did not prevent him from transferring to Sam Houston State, where he played his final two collegiate seasons. Until the NCAA punishes people for violations, the number of scandals will remain high (or possibly increase).

By Jon Berke
Make the Committee on Infractions a completely unaffiliated department from the NCAA. As of right now, the committee has almost no respect amongst CFB fans and officials anyway, given their wide-ranging responses to each new inquiry, each less sensible than the last. So get rid of it as it currently exists, and ask for a third-party institution to take on that role. Without the connection to the NCAA, one might hope that the long-standing perception of preferential treatment could be put to rest.

By Brian Harbach

The only way to fix these problems is for the people involved in the Athletic Departments to start questioning the players’ actions, outings and possessions. A player eating dinner at expensive steak houses every other week might be something to look into. If your starting cornerback from a poor background starts driving to practice in a 350Z, ask him where he got it from and start looking into it. If a player complaining he can’t take his girlfriend out to dinner suddenly starts eating meals at Red Lobster after every game maybe that is worth investigating.

Schools don’t need compliance departments to tell them if what a player did was illegal; they need investigative departments to find out if a player is doing anything illegal. It feels like Athletic Departments turn a blind eye when quirky behavior is occurring and they put themselves into these positions. Was it that hard for Ohio State to realize Terrelle Pryor probably couldn’t afford the cars he was driving and so many different ones? To the casual fan it screams violation but Ohio State was behind the eight ball with that situation.

An investigative department would not be there to harass the players, just observe so the school could ask questions and make judgments based on the players answers. The punishments for the scandals in college football are severe, if you have to do some digging to avoid them…do it.

By Bart Doan
The NCAA rulebook is so archaic, you feel like archeologists discovered it when they were digging thru the ruins of Mesopotamia. It’s arbitrary, outdated, and completely vague, which allows for schools to hire ex-NCAA officials (hello, Ohio State!) to help backdoor deal their way out of any serious sanctions. The only thing the NCAA can do is change it, which it looks like the Presidents are trying. Under the current system, nothing can be done, aside from going overboard on punishments (hello, USC) to every offender. With all the programs under the NCAA knife right now, that’d bite the hand that feeds, with major television ratings-grabbers being penalized. They’d better change it soon. The NCAA rule book dwarfs the Clifford series when it comes to how well it relates to the modern world.

Aside from that, ESPN’s Dan Dakich had a revolutionary idea on how to fix college sports. Years ago, he was down to the final 2 for the Bowling Green coaching job. He and the other candidate had to go before an academic committee and one of the questions asked was “what do you feel is an acceptable graduation rate?”

Dakich: 100%

Committee member: Do you feel like that’s feasible?

Dakich: We just did it at IU this past year, so yes.

Other candidate: 50% would be an attainable goal. That’s a higher percentage than the regular student body.

Coach Dakich was hired, obviously. And he surmises that to change college athletics, it’s as simple as actually hiring coaches who give a darn about the academic progress of the kids they’re coaching. It makes perfect sense. Put people in positions that care about doing the right thing, and magically, the right thing will get done. Would the NCAA ever consider actually doing that? Sure would be nice if they kicked the idea around.

By David Sweigart
Under current NCAA rules the answer is for the major universities that wish to compete in the BCS division to pay two independent NCAA certified compliance officers to oversee the enforcement of NCAA rules and laws at the institution. The universities can afford to foot the bill for the training and hiring of such officers and the creation of the specialized position. The officers are responsible for ensuring that the rules set forth by the NCAA are clearly interpreted, respected, and followed at the university. The other part of the job will involve documenting and reporting any issues that arise and subsequent solutions that are enacted. Like an accountant working in the Internal Audit department, these officers would provide the university with reasonable assurance that the current compliance department is adequate and operating effectively. To ensure that the officers remain independent of the university, the NCAA will rotate the officers every three years to a new university. In the event that the university is subject to investigation, the overseeing officers will also be subject to investigation and will lose their jobs if found guilty of wrong doing.

2011 CFN State of the Game Topics  
- Should The Death Penalty Be On The Table? 
- What One Thing Can Stop The Cheating? | Bloggers Analysis
- How To Fix The NCAA | Bloggers Analysis
- Is There Institutional Control? | Bloggers Analysis
- The Cam Newton Situation | Bloggers Analysis
Was Stanley McClover Telling The Truth? | Bloggers Analysis
Should Players Get a Bigger Stipend? | Bloggers Analysis
- Should a one-loss SEC team play for it all? | Bloggers Analysis
- Why isn't there a playoff? | Bloggers Analysis
- The Programs About To Blow Up | Bloggers Analysis
- Does The Longhorn Network Matter? | Bloggers Analysis
- What'll Happen In Ten Years? | Bloggers Analysis
- When Should Players Turn Pro? | Bloggers Analysis
- What's Your Beef? The Biggest Complaints | Bloggers Analysis

LIMITED TIME ONLY: CLICK HERE for a Free Week of Top-Rated Selections

- Suggestions or something we missed? Let us know
- Follow us ... http://twitter.com/ColFootballNews