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Bloggers - Is There Any Institutional Control

CollegeFootballNews.com
Posted Aug 21, 2011


From the CFN bloggers, here are their thoughts on all the important topics going into the 2011 college football season.


State of the Game - Bloggers 

Is There Institutional Control?


2011 CFN State of the Game Topics  
- Should The Death Penalty Be On The Table? 
- What One Thing Can Stop The Cheating? | Bloggers Analysis
- How To Fix The NCAA | Bloggers Analysis
- Is There Institutional Control? | Bloggers Analysis
- The Cam Newton Situation | Bloggers Analysis
Was Stanley McClover Telling The Truth? | Bloggers Analysis
Should Players Get a Bigger Stipend? | Bloggers Analysis
- Should a one-loss SEC team play for it all? | Bloggers Analysis
- Why isn't there a playoff? | Bloggers Analysis
- The Programs About To Blow Up | Bloggers Analysis
- Does The Longhorn Network Matter? | Bloggers Analysis
- What'll Happen In Ten Years? | Bloggers Analysis
- When Should Players Turn Pro? | Bloggers Analysis
- What's Your Beef? The Biggest Complaints | Bloggers Analysis

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By Justine Hendricks
Yes, but only if the institutions are committed to doing so. It is possible to employ more compliance personnel, to watch players more carefully, and to monitor their interactions with boosters and agents - maybe not 100%, but certainly more than many schools have been doing.

Some schools may not have known what was going on with one or two of their players; in those cases, additional compliance officers would increase the chances of preventing problems before they occur. At schools where large numbers of players were involved in violations, the preliminary evidence suggests the schools - or at least certain key employees - simply chose to ignore what was going on and thought that by looking the other way, they could pretend they were oblivious. If they had truly wanted to take control of the situation, they could’ve but in many instances, winning both on the field and on the recruiting trail, was the top priority.

By Phil Harrison
The key word is “control.” It is possible to maintain control, but never complete control. With so many athletes, in combination with the decision making of a just past adolescent mind-set, there are bound to be issues. Add to that, the real-time reporting and abundance of media, and the icebergs floating in the waters are just too big to avoid altogether. This outbreak of diseased intentions can’t be stopped, but with the right monitoring and reporting, containment is attainable. It is only right that the NCAA looks at the spirit of what’s going on, and not the end result.

By Terry Johnson
Within reason, yes it is possible to maintain institutional control. However, no school can monitor its players 24 hours per day, so there will always be issues.
 
By Matthew Peaslee
All of the secondary allegations called out at against schools involve a lack of institutional control. The irresponsibility of internal operations make it seem that no program can be trusted. However, with stiffer mandates directly from the NCAA, programs can indeed possess institutional control. It’s going to take harsh observation from the higher ups, but individual programs should have control over their handlings.

By Bradlee Simoneaux
Schools and coaches can only do so much to monitor the actions of their players. There will always be cases where star athletes are given improper benefits, and there will be no way for the schools or coaches to know about each and every thing. But, in cases where there are many players involved, and there are extreme allegations of “crimes” committed then there most definitely should have been action taken on the part of the schools and coaches to fix them. It is possible for programs to maintain control, maybe not of each and every player, but they certainly can for the organization as a whole.
 
By Brian Harbach
Institutional Control can be maintained if those in charge follow the rules…there is a lot of grey in the world but Institutional Control is black and white. Coaches will never know everything that happens to their players, that is an unfair expectation. What isn’t unfair is to expect once a violation is known by a coach or administrator that it be self-reported to the NCAA.

A lack of institutional control is a knowingly ignoring the rules of the sport and allowing a player to continue as if those rules were never broken. If Jim Tressel had no idea about the rules his players broke he would still be the head coach at Ohio State. Once he chose to ignore those violations he became part of the violation and so did the University.

The Athletic Departments should be held to a higher standard, this is not the equivalent of missing the speed limit change from 65 to 55 and getting pulled over for going 70 MPH. A lack of institutional control is driving through a stale red light because you don’t feel like stopping.

By Marc Basham
In this day and age it is hard to maintain institutional control, but depending on your definition of institutional control, many programs are accomplishing this task. How many times in the past five or so years have you heard about the Northwestern or Vanderbilt football teams going under NCAA investigation? Granted, their success on the field is not quite stellar, both of those programs have maintained clean programs and graduated nearly all of their student athletes. Vandy even went so far as to dissolving the athletic department entirely, incorporating athletics in the Division of Student Life. Now, would schools like USC and Florida take such a substantial leap as to dissolve their athletic department and place its responsibilities in a campus division focused on student life? Not a chance, they have much more riding on their athletics than the Commodores. However, short of doing what Vanderbilt did and placing athletics under the guidance of this division, renewing an emphasis of the 'student' in 'student athlete,' institutional control is a tough issue to fully police and one that is nearly impossible in the business of college football.

By Jon Berke
No. When John Wooden – the ‘patron saint’ of modern college athletics in many ways – couldn’t even manage to keep a handle on one booster back in the 1960’s and 70’s, there’s no way the far less-scrupulous coaches of today will be able to do so. There’s far too much money at stake, and far too many ways to avoid even the most diligent of compliance efforts.

By Nico Roesler
I believe it is possible to maintain institutional control. However, it is no singular identities responsibility. The responsibility to not simply reside with the coaches, but it is also on the shoulders of each school’s compliance office, each school’s academic office, and there needs to be responsibility within boosters and within players. Create a comprehensive system at universities where athletes are educated about the risks of taking illegal benefits so that they do not think that that is just part of it. Create an environment where athletes, boosters, coaches, professors, and family members know that if the athlete crosses any lines, punishments will be handed down and any risk of that is not worth it.

By Gabe Harris
Not unless the NCAA cuts down on monitoring some of the silly and small violations they spend so much paperwork time on such as texting and the “bump rule”. These take up too much time and there are not enough resources to focus on extreme violations.

By Bart Doan
Taken from the Pac 12’s compliance PDF via the NCAA’s official prepared “Principles of Institutional Control” is this epic line…

In a situation in which adequate institutional procedures exist, at least on paper, a practical, common-sense approach is appropriate in determining whether they are adequately monitored and enforced by a person in "control."

To which I go back to the epic Voltaire line, assumingly about the NCAA (joke): “Common sense is not so common.”

So to answer the question on whether or not it’s possible to maintain IC…sure…because as a girl I met in college once told me, “it ain’t cheating if you don’t get caught, right?”

It still is, but the don’t ask-don’t tell policy of the NCAA going on right now is lacking some of that “common sense.” You probably can maintain institutional control, but it’ll cost you a few games a year.

By David Sweigart
It is important to define what the dreaded phrase “lack of Institutional control” means first…. LOIC revolves around the belief that the university does not have adequate policies and procedures in place to comply with NCAA rules and that NCAA rules are not being monitored and enforced by designated individuals at the time of violation. Theoretically, having a compliance department that is on top of everything going on in the athletic programs across every sport at the school is paramount to avoiding the NCAA charging the university with LOIC. Naturally football needs its own compliance team because it is the biggest sport to deal with – by far. That means under theory it is the responsibility of the compliance department to know how the athletes they monitor paid for an arm sleeve of tattoos, received brand new cars, and have new suits for every road game. As well as know if they are working summer jobs at triple the normal rate and how they took trips to Miami to party and pop bottles in the clubs. The bigger mystery though is what makes the NCAA decide one institution should be hit with LOIC and another should not? Look no further then the investigations with Ohio St, North Carolina, and Boise State. The NCAA decided not to hit either OSU or UNC with LOIC but has thrown that charge out there against Boise St, a school the majority of people didn’t even know is currently under investigation. Another difference? Boise self reported a few minor violations across several sports including football as well as a major violation with their women’s tennis program and is being slammed with the dreaded LOIC while OSU & UNC had multiple problems and infractions that needed to be uncovered with an investigation. It is possible to do everything in your power as an institution to set up controls to make sure the athletes at the university are not breaking NCAA rules and are properly being monitored. However, at the end of the day it is still left up to the NCAA to determine whether or not the university should be charged with LOIC. Lack of institutional control is not a black and white law that is easily interpreted or clearly defined but more of a thickly shaded gray law that the NCAA uses and applies at their own discretion.

By Randall Gyorko
No. It’s possible to maintain the perception and idea of Institutional Control, but it’s impossible to maintain actual Institutional Control. These athletes and the boosters out trying to become a “made man” within the program are like a daycare. One cries, they all cry. One gets a bottle, they all want a bottle. One gets free sideline passes, the next guy needs sideline passes and front row seats. You can hire the biggest compliance office in the history of the world. It won’t matter. They get to these kids before they step foot on campus and they have them the entire time they are on campus. I believe most try to do the right thing (with the institution) but not many college kids are going to turn down freebies.

2011 CFN State of the Game Topics  
- Should The Death Penalty Be On The Table? 
- What One Thing Can Stop The Cheating? | Bloggers Analysis
- How To Fix The NCAA | Bloggers Analysis
- Is There Institutional Control? | Bloggers Analysis
- The Cam Newton Situation | Bloggers Analysis
Was Stanley McClover Telling The Truth? | Bloggers Analysis
Should Players Get a Bigger Stipend? | Bloggers Analysis
- Should a one-loss SEC team play for it all? | Bloggers Analysis
- Why isn't there a playoff? | Bloggers Analysis
- The Programs About To Blow Up | Bloggers Analysis
- Does The Longhorn Network Matter? | Bloggers Analysis
- What'll Happen In Ten Years? | Bloggers Analysis
- When Should Players Turn Pro? | Bloggers Analysis
- What's Your Beef? The Biggest Complaints | Bloggers Analysis

LIMITED TIME ONLY: CLICK HERE for a Free Week of Top-Rated Selections

- Suggestions or something we missed? Let us know
- Follow us ... http://twitter.com/ColFootballNews