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Bloggers - McClover & The Truth

CollegeFootballNews.com
Posted Aug 21, 2011


From the CFN bloggers, here are their thoughts on all the important topics going into the 2011 college football season.


State of the Game - Bloggers 

Did McClover Tell The Truth?


2011 CFN State of the Game Topics  
- Should The Death Penalty Be On The Table? 
- What One Thing Can Stop The Cheating? | Bloggers Analysis
- How To Fix The NCAA | Bloggers Analysis
- Is There Institutional Control? | Bloggers Analysis
- The Cam Newton Situation | Bloggers Analysis
Was Stanley McClover Telling The Truth? | Bloggers Analysis
Should Players Get a Bigger Stipend? | Bloggers Analysis
- Should a one-loss SEC team play for it all? | Bloggers Analysis
- Why isn't there a playoff? | Bloggers Analysis
- The Programs About To Blow Up | Bloggers Analysis
- Does The Longhorn Network Matter? | Bloggers Analysis
- What'll Happen In Ten Years? | Bloggers Analysis
- When Should Players Turn Pro? | Bloggers Analysis
- What's Your Beef? The Biggest Complaints | Bloggers Analysis

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Question No. 5. Do you believe Stanley McClover told the truth? If yes, then why isn’t anything happening? 

By Justine Hendricks
Stanley McClover probably told the truth. Even if he did it for financial benefits for himself (or his boys’ organization as he’s claimed), he probably didn’t need to make anything up. Enough has been revealed about the sordid side of big-time college sports recently that his story didn’t surprise me for a second.

I believe it’s true, even if only in part, but it takes the NCAA a long, long time to investigate these matters and its hands have been pretty full recently. If and when anything does come of it, it’ll likely be in conjunction with other investigations at Auburn (Cam Newton) or Ohio State (Terrelle Pryor, Tattoogate) so the NCAA can slap the “lack of institutional control” label on. They seem to be pretty fond of that one these days.

By Phil Harrison
Like anything, the real truth probably lies somewhere in the middle of McClover’s story and all of those that want to turn a blind eye. The reason nothing has happening is because of it all being hearsay. We’ve all been witnesses to how hard it is to prove things that have more substance to them. So, how much harder can it be to substantiate the $500 handshakes and side deals? There is just not a lot to go on, and those that could corroborate in good standing are in the fraternity of athletes and lack any type of initiative to open up to anyone for fear of alienating themselves. To bring home a point made prior, the NCAA needs more power to substantiate matters like these.

By Nico Roesler
I do believe Stanley McGlover in his statements that he too received payment for playing at Auburn. There is no reason why he would come out and say what he said without naming names is he was simply trying to spite somebody. He seems to sincerely want to change the culture around college football. The thing is, nothing has come of it. Nothing has come of it because the NCAA is battling so many other things right now. What is more important? A former player saying he received illegal money a few years ago or Ohio State exercising a large cover up for players who have been found to overtly stomp on the illegal benefit rules set forth by the NCAA? Obviously, the latter seeing that is the more timely infraction. Piling on to the problem is all of the other timely problems stacking on the NCAA’s plate.

By Gabe Harris
I think it is possible that Stanley McClover told the truth about getting paid to come to Auburn, received money from LSU and Michigan State boosters, and sexual favors at Ohio State; but I am skeptical of his account. Why does he not name names? Why does he not remember how much money was given to him at Auburn? If he felt he owed it to Auburn to go there, why not the same obligation to LSU, Ohio State, or Michigan State? McClover blew through his NFL money and can no longer get a job playing football in the NFL. This is a way to keep his name out there and hopefully profit from it in my opinion.

By Terry Johnson
Yes, Stanley McClover told the truth. Unfortunately, proving McClover’s story will be nearly impossible. McClover claims that he received a bag of cash with the amount unknown. Since he didn’t know the amount, no paper trail exists to substantiate these claims. Unless someone involved with this incident comes forward with evidence, nothing will come of these accusations.

By Jon Berke
I think he definitely told the truth. There’s very little incentive for him to have lied – observe the fallout since his interview. He’s received nothing but grief for it, something he had to have known was likely to happen. I don’t think there’s been any follow-up because it’s easy to scapegoat a whistleblower (especially if he does so after the fact), and there was far too much riding on Auburn escaping too much notice. The double-whammy of the Heisman/National Title gives potential investigators far too much incentive to look the other way – at least for now.

By Brian Harbach 

Stanley McClover told HBO what they wanted to hear and nothing more, it is hard to imagine any player today not getting extra money or a free dinner from time to time. But if HBO does not pay for interviews and McClover had to get all this off of his chest why did he not name names? Why would he not give up these alleged bag-men to the NCAA after he threw his school under the bus?

His accusations were serious and significant if true but five months later no one is even talking about them and nothing is happening at Auburn. Think about how fast the North Carolina and Ohio State investigations went? The smoke with Reggie Bush was noticeable immediately because an agent was screaming at the top of his lungs about the house the Bush family was living in. But after nearly a year investigating Auburn…nothing.

McClover didn’t do Auburn any favors by talking and not naming names, he hurt himself and the only way to clear his name is to give those names up. By not giving up the names, McClover is the one who looks bad and not Auburn. Until he is willing to be completely honest with the NCAA or HBO sports there is nothing to see.

By Bradlee Simoneaux
Yes, I believe Stanley McClover told the truth about the improper benefits offered to him. He might have exaggerated some parts of his story or indulged in the truth a little too much, but there is no doubt in my mind that he would not have admitted to all of these violations if they were not true. The reason nothing is happening is because the NCAA is keeping everything under wraps. There is a lot more investigating going on with this story than we are told, and I believe the NCAA is attempting to put all of the pieces of the puzzle together to learn what truly has been happening at Auburn and across college football these past few years.
 
By Matthew Peaslee
Some secrets just can’t be kept forever. When Stanley McClover “blew the whistle” about the improper benefits he received while a football player at Auburn, many listened. Many listened and put up their dukes. McClover turned into an enemy and disloyal to the War Eagle. Fans of his alma mater turned against him, just for being honest. McClover had nothing to gain from speaking out about his time at Auburn, except to spearhead changes in the college football system. He believes college athletes should be paid, legally. It is a radical move that would put a better picture on what could be considered “proper” and “improper” in terms of benefits. Since McClover revealed the wrongdoing, nothing has been done to definitely ensure that these proceedings won’t happen again, elsewhere. Simply, the NCAA doesn’t know how to stop it. The influential bodies that encompass a program are great and hard to control. They can investigate and regulate all they want, but there is still no clear answer on how to keep the money and gifts in the hands of the boosters and out of the reach of players.

By Randall Gyorko
No. I don’t think he was telling the truth. I think he saw a quick way to make a name for himself and to try to make some money. He already washed out of the NFL and with that fine Auburn education, he realized he needed some cash. Why not attempt to jump on the media gravytrain of “hey, I got paid while at college”. I’m always skeptical on things that come out so long after the fact. Especially when the topic is so hot.

By David Sweigart
Stanley McClover along with three other former Auburn football players; Troy Reddick, Chaz Ramsey, and Raven Gray allege they were paid cash to attend Auburn as well as when they were enrolled at AU. McClover insists he decided to attend Auburn because he felt guilty about taking the money. He also alleges he was paid $4,000 for his performance in the Iron Bowl. Troy Reddick told HBO he was offered cash during his recruitment but did not take it however later in his career he alleges he was given money to remain in the program because he was unhappy and wanted to leave. Ramsey alleges he received cash handshakes after games and Gray estimated he received around $3,000 in cash so he attended Auburn from JUCO because he was loyal to the man who gave him money. The problem with all of this? No names were given by McClover or anyone else when the NCAA inquired about the Real Sports episode. Everyone in the segment alleges they received cash and to try and prove – or disprove the exchange of cash is nearly impossible. The NCAA needs proof to take any action against Auburn and while it is believable these players received cash hand outs –attempting to prove it with the information available is another story.

By Marc Basham
It truly is hard to not believe the story. After all, with so many allegations of illegal payments spread all across the college football map, why not McClover? Working through the allegations with a fine-toothed comb, one begins to discover a series of allegations directed towards the Auburn football program regarding pay-for-play scandals. With this history it is hard to argue against the idea that McClover may have received an extra kick-back. As with every college scandal involving illegal payments, an unhappy customer is usually the one to blow the whistle on the whole operation. Could McClover turn out the be the one that takes the wind out of Auburn's sails? Only time will tell, but it looks as though he may be the start of a rocky road for the Tigers.

2011 CFN State of the Game Topics  
- Should The Death Penalty Be On The Table? 
- What One Thing Can Stop The Cheating? | Bloggers Analysis
- How To Fix The NCAA | Bloggers Analysis
- Is There Institutional Control? | Bloggers Analysis
- The Cam Newton Situation | Bloggers Analysis
Was Stanley McClover Telling The Truth? | Bloggers Analysis
Should Players Get a Bigger Stipend? | Bloggers Analysis
- Should a one-loss SEC team play for it all? | Bloggers Analysis
- Why isn't there a playoff? | Bloggers Analysis
- The Programs About To Blow Up | Bloggers Analysis
- Does The Longhorn Network Matter? | Bloggers Analysis
- What'll Happen In Ten Years? | Bloggers Analysis
- When Should Players Turn Pro? | Bloggers Analysis
- What's Your Beef? The Biggest Complaints | Bloggers Analysis

LIMITED TIME ONLY: CLICK HERE for a Free Week of Top-Rated Selections

- Suggestions or something we missed? Let us know
- Follow us ... http://twitter.com/ColFootballNews