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State of the Game 2011 - SEC & The BCS
LSU QB Jordan Jefferson
LSU QB Jordan Jefferson
CollegeFootballNews.com
Posted Aug 22, 2011


Fixing the scandals, Cam Newton, the Longhorn Network, and more. Along with the CFNers, check out the opinions on key topics going into the season from Matt Hayes from the Sporting News and the Chicago Tribune's Teddy Greenstein.


State of the Game 

The One-Loss SEC Team Issue


2011 CFN State of the Game Topics  
- Should The Death Penalty Be On The Table? 
- What One Thing Can Stop The Cheating? | Bloggers Analysis
- How To Fix The NCAA | Bloggers Analysis
- Is There Institutional Control? | Bloggers Analysis
- The Cam Newton Situation | Bloggers Analysis
Was Stanley McClover Telling The Truth? | Bloggers Analysis
Should Players Get a Bigger Stipend? | Bloggers Analysis
- Should a one-loss SEC team play for it all? | Bloggers Analysis
- Why isn't there a playoff? | Bloggers Analysis
- The Programs About To Blow Up | Bloggers Analysis
- Does The Longhorn Network Matter? | Bloggers Analysis
- What'll Happen In Ten Years? | Bloggers Analysis
- When Should Players Turn Pro? | Bloggers Analysis
- What's Your Beef? The Biggest Complaints | Bloggers Analysis

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Question No. 7: Considering the league’s recent run of success, if a one-loss SEC champion isn’t playing for the national title – assuming the loss isn’t that bad – will you feel comfortable with the BCS Championship winner being called the national champion? 

E-mail Pete Fiutak

Not even a little bit.

You're telling me any two non-SEC teams you can name - Oklahoma, Oregon, Stanford, Florida State, Boise State, anyone  - could get through the SEC unscathed? It's all about the strength of schedule, and last year, Oregon played Stanford, and that was about it. TCU didn't play anyone of note until it beat Wisconsin in the Rose Bowl. If Auburn's comeback had fallen short against Alabama before going on to throttle South Carolina in the SEC Championship, it would've been an impossible sell to convince the world that the Oregon - TCU winner was the best team in America.

I'm not a believer that the SEC champion belongs in the national championship no matter what, and I don't hold the boxing belief that you have to destroy the champ to win a decision, but to leave a one-loss SEC champ out of the BCS Championship the two teams that get in had better be DOMINANT, and it had better come against a nasty schedule.

Sorry, Boise State.

The idea is to put the two best teams in the national championship, and they'll have to pass the eyeball test, the schedule test, and the smell test, because the last thing I want is for a one-loss SEC champion to obliterate someone in the Sugar Bowl and then have a legitimate claim that it could beat anyone in America.

By Matt Hayes
Sporting News


Absolutely. The best two teams will play for it all. And if they’re not from the SEC, then they’re not.

By Teddy Greenstein
Chicago Tribune


It depends. If it’s an ACC or Big East champ that played a weak non-con schedule, I’d probably rather see the SEC champ in the big game.

By Richard Cirminiello

There are so many variables not provided here, such as the league of the champ and its non-conference schedule, but probably not. If a 12-1 SEC champ has navigated the thorniest conference in America, it deserves an opportunity to play for the BCS Championship a month later.

By Matt Zemek

No, but that response is not rooted in the belief that a one-loss SEC team should be in the BCS title game. I’m not comfortable with *any* BCS champion as long as we don’t guarantee at least three non-conference games of appreciable stature and difficulty before the championship game. I’m writing an article in which I document the schedules of college football’s national champions over the past 25 seasons. Few teams played more than two reasonably formidable non-conference opponents from other regions of the country during the regular season. Not since USC in 2004, with Notre Dame and Virginia Tech on the schedule, has a national champion (yeah, USC was stripped of its title; it doesn’t change the larger reality…) played as many as two credible non-conference opponents from outside regions. How can we claim to have “national” champions in a sport that gives teams – especially those in the SEC – no incentive to leave their home region each season? The sport needs to find creative ways to mandate high-stakes intersectional matchups during the regular season or within the framework of a four-team playoff after the bowls. I’ve offered numerous proposals over the past three seasons.

By Barrett Sallee
Follow me on Twitter: @BarrettSallee

Even as an SEC guy, yes, but that really depends on the situation. Using this year as an example, if it’s undefeated Oklahoma vs. undefeated Oregon (which would have a win over LSU under its belt), then sure. However, if we are debating a one-loss SEC Champ against an undefeated Boise State for the second spot, I’m taking the SEC champ without even batting an eye. The SEC has earned the benefit of the doubt.

By Russ Mitchell
Follow me on Twitter @russmitchellcfb

Are you kidding me? It's not just that the SEC has won five straight National Championships. It's that four different teams have done it over that span.

That's not like a USC winning seven straight crowns (read: no competition). How's that a conference? Same with tOSU in the Big Ten. Or Texas and Oklahoma winning seven straight crowns and playing in the last 12 conference championships (winning a whopping nine). Twelve straight championships - by what qualification do you determine champion?

Oregon and Stanford... That's it for the top 25. My grandmother would have a 50/50 chance under that scenario, and the old woman's been dead for 27 years.

The ACC's recent track record has been putrid. The Big Ten has one team ranked in the preseason top 10. Meanwhile the SEC has eight teams that are considered top 25 worthy, five of them from a single division. All those teams must play each other. How is this even a debate.

As for Boise state, this is all you need to know.

As long as we're going to allow private promoters to force us into selecting our play-in championship like it's a beauty contest or gymnastics event, this has to matter.

I'll double down and go one step further - it's not whether a one loss SEC team deserves a shot over an undefeated Boise State, Stanford, Wisconsin, West Virginia or FSU, it's whether a two loss SEC team does. Until our sport gets the playoff it so richly deserves, you'll get some who will argue yes even to that.


2011 CFN State of the Game Topics  
- Should The Death Penalty Be On The Table? 
- What One Thing Can Stop The Cheating? | Bloggers Analysis
- How To Fix The NCAA | Bloggers Analysis
- Is There Institutional Control? | Bloggers Analysis
- The Cam Newton Situation | Bloggers Analysis
Was Stanley McClover Telling The Truth? | Bloggers Analysis
Should Players Get a Bigger Stipend? | Bloggers Analysis
- Should a one-loss SEC team play for it all? | Bloggers Analysis
- Why isn't there a playoff? | Bloggers Analysis
- The Programs About To Blow Up | Bloggers Analysis
- Does The Longhorn Network Matter? | Bloggers Analysis
- What'll Happen In Ten Years? | Bloggers Analysis
- When Should Players Turn Pro? | Bloggers Analysis
- What's Your Beef? The Biggest Complaints | Bloggers Analysis

LIMITED TIME ONLY: CLICK HERE for a Free Week of Top-Rated Selections

- Suggestions or something we missed? Let us know
- Follow us ... http://twitter.com/ColFootballNews