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Bloggers - SEC & The BCS Championship

CollegeFootballNews.com
Posted Aug 22, 2011


From the CFN bloggers, here are their thoughts on all the important topics going into the 2011 college football season.


State of the Game - Bloggers

The One-Loss SEC Team Issue

2011 CFN State of the Game Topics  
- Should The Death Penalty Be On The Table? 
- What One Thing Can Stop The Cheating? | Bloggers Analysis
- How To Fix The NCAA | Bloggers Analysis
- Is There Institutional Control? | Bloggers Analysis
- The Cam Newton Situation | Bloggers Analysis
Was Stanley McClover Telling The Truth? | Bloggers Analysis
Should Players Get a Bigger Stipend? | Bloggers Analysis
- Should a one-loss SEC team play for it all? | Bloggers Analysis
- Why isn't there a playoff? | Bloggers Analysis
- The Programs About To Blow Up | Bloggers Analysis
- Does The Longhorn Network Matter? | Bloggers Analysis
- What'll Happen In Ten Years? | Bloggers Analysis
- When Should Players Turn Pro? | Bloggers Analysis
- What's Your Beef? The Biggest Complaints | Bloggers Analysis

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By Randall Gyorko
Personally, I will feel totally comfortable if the two teams playing for the National Championship are undefeated. I will be able to fully embrace the winner of said battle of undefeated as the rightful National Champion; however, a little piece of me will always wonder what if. What if that SEC Champ was the best team and got tripped up somewhere in their #1 ranked SOS. In a perfect world, the run will come to an end when someone beats a SEC team in the big game, but if a National Championship game is played, and it doesn’t include a team from the SEC, I’ll be fine with that as well.

By Gabe Harris
I would not feel comfortable with the legitimacy of the BCS Championship winner if a one-loss SEC champion is not included unless that one loss was to a non-conference opponent; for example, Boise State beating Georgia. In a non-playoff world, the SEC has earned the benefit of the doubt.
 
By Matthew Peaslee
The BCS Championship is the National Champion, plain and simple. The title game is played to determine the best collegiate team in the land and that accomplishment should always be honored. A one-loss SEC team that is not playing in the coveted game cannot be determined the National Champion in any way. If the best argument for a playoff in college football is to “decide it on the field,” the National Title game does just that. If a one-loss team, even if that team is in the SEC, isn’t even in the game, it can just enjoy a trip to another bowl game.

By Bradlee Simoneaux
Absolutely not, unless there are two undefeated teams from other BCS conferences AND the one loss by the SEC team was in non-conference play. Any SEC team that gets through a season with just one loss has proven time and again to be more than deserving to get a shot at the national championship. Losing one conference game in the SEC is nothing to clamor about, but if the SEC team lost to a non-conference opponent, such as LSU losing to Oregon or Alabama somehow falling to Penn State then an undefeated team from one of those conferences should be placed ahead of the one-loss SEC team. Eventually the SEC champion is going to end up with two losses like LSU in 2007, and without the tremendous amount of luck the Tigers got to make it into the championship game there will be a BCS Championship game without an SEC presence.

By Phil Harrison
I would be comfortable with it, and you could argue that it might even be better for college football, but that doesn’t make it right. The SEC has owned the landscape, while every other conference’s bushes are dying in the shade. With five straight NCs, and until the other conferences catch up, a one loss SEC team deserves to be there. The conference is the best top to bottom, and the schedule is brutal for any one of the contenders. End of story.

By Marc Basham
November 18, 2006, Columbus, Ohio. The number two ranked Michigan Wolverines entered Ohio Stadium and dropped a close decision to the number one ranked Ohio State Buckeyes in what was referred to as the “Game of the Century.” However, even after that game, in the weeks that followed a case was being made for Michigan to still get a shot at the BCS title in a rematch against the Buckeyes. Critics said that the historic quality of the game was more than enough to warrant the rematch in Glendale, Ariz. They said that the one-loss Florida Gators played a sloppy SEC Championship game, proving that they were not up to the task like Michigan. The end result? Florida 41, Ohio State 14. There is no question the SEC is the best conference in college football. The level of talent each team has, top to bottom, exceeds all the others. They have also proven this fact time and time again, winning the last five BCS National Championships, with three of those coming from one-loss teams. Until another conference can prove it can compete with this string of success, it is hard to argue against an SEC champion with one loss being in the national title game. Should a BCS National Championship game featuring an undefeated West Virginia versus an undefeated Oregon take place, with the one-loss SEC Champion Alabama on the outside looking in, the title game is just. If a team runs the table in a BCS conference, they have the right to a title shot, even if the team is from the ACC, Big East, Big XII, etc. However, SEC teams with one loss deserve precedence over an undefeated Boise State or any other one-loss team in college football. It's just a testament to the quality of play in the league.

By Terry Johnson
Strength of schedule needs to mean something when playing for a BCS Championship. Since the SEC has won the last five national titles, it has established itself as the toughest conference in the country. An unbeaten Virginia Tech team that plays a creampuff non-conference schedule should never play for a BCS title in front of a one (or two) loss SEC team. An undefeated Boise State and an undefeated West Virginia should get consideration for the BCS title game if they can knock off Georgia and LSU respectively. But unless those victories were convincing, they should end up in a different BCS game. The only plausible scenario for leaving out a one-loss SEC Champion would be if the Pac 12 or Big Ten Champions both finished undefeated. Those two conferences play conference title games, and play strong competition (although not as strong as the SEC).

By Jon Berke
Considering the league’s recent run of success, if a one-loss SEC champion isn’t playing for the national title – assuming the loss isn’t that bad – will you feel comfortable with the BCS Championship winner being called the national champion? Yes. The only *possible* way a 1-loss SEC team doesn’t get in will be if at least two other BCS-level teams are undefeated. Any undefeated team that also has a victory over another undefeated team in a title game will undoubtedly deserve the title of national champion.

By Nico Roesler
One loss in the SEC does not compare to one-loss in the ACC, or really any other conference. If Alabama losses to South Carolina, that is nothing like Virginia Tech losing to North Carolina State. Both of the teams I mentioned in the SEC have a legitimate chance of beating any team in the country on any night. North Carolina State and Virginia Tech do not, at least not at the odds the other two do. The annual SEC champion needs to be in the National Championship game. Period. The conference has proven itself to be THE conference to contend with. If your team thinks they are the best in the country, imagine pitting them against SEC opponents week in and week out and then imagine their record. Guarantee there are more losses than you would want to admit. The BCS, because of this flaw, cannot effectively name a true national champion with the way teams are picked for bowl games today.

By Bart Doan
Yes. The SEC is vastly overrated. In the BCS era, they’re all of 1 game better than the much maligned Big 10 head to head. On top of that, they play far fewer OOC games against BCS or top 25 opponents than the Pac 10, and I don’t think I need to remind you that the Pac 10 has only 10 teams. The SEC is overrated because they have network tie-ins that need the SEC brand to look like its better than it really is for ratings purposes. The football is excellent down south, but it’s excellent in a lot of places. Look this year at the Big 12 south. Three of those teams are routinely rated in someone’s preseason top 10, and the division returns all of 1 team that had a regular season losing record. Yet how much do we hear about the (former) Big 12 south? Nunya, because they don’t have the network deal to pollute the minds of the voters and the masses. Not only will I feel comfortable, I’ll feel like it’s good for the game. I’m not a hater. I’m a realist. Bias exists in everything. Tie a few million onto it? It runs rampant.

By David Sweigart
Using the 2011 season as an example; is a 13-0 Oregon team facing a 13-0 FSU team or is a 12-0 Boise St team playing a 12-0 Big East team? In the case of the former, both Oregon and FSU will have played a 13th game, a conference championship, to get to the national title game. The addition of this game on the resume carries a lot of clout. Both schools would also have big out of conference wins with Oregon beating LSU and FSU beating Oklahoma and Florida. In this particular scenario, both teams will have earned the right to play for the title over a one-loss SEC team. In the case of the latter, Boise would have played essentially a two-game season and has wins over UGA in the dome and TCU at home. The Big East winner will not play a conference championship and will only play 7 conference games during the season. Could you imagine a 12-1 SEC Champion Alabama team being passed over for the national championship by Boise St and a team from the Big East? The SEC may leave the NCAA/BCS the very next season if that happened. Conversely, what if the name on the jersey said South Carolina instead of Alabama and all factors above remained the same? Publicly that becomes an interesting debate because the Gamecocks are an SEC team who lack football history and a storied winning tradition. Would USC receive the same public support that Alabama would garner? If the two teams facing off are undefeated, have big OOC wins, and played in a conference championship game, then SEC fans just have to accept the fact that their one-loss team is not playing for the title. Other than that scenario, the SEC team deserves the benefit of the doubt when compared side by side to other national title contenders.

2011 CFN State of the Game Topics  
- Should The Death Penalty Be On The Table? 
- What One Thing Can Stop The Cheating? | Bloggers Analysis
- How To Fix The NCAA | Bloggers Analysis
- Is There Institutional Control? | Bloggers Analysis
- The Cam Newton Situation | Bloggers Analysis
Was Stanley McClover Telling The Truth? | Bloggers Analysis
Should Players Get a Bigger Stipend? | Bloggers Analysis
- Should a one-loss SEC team play for it all? | Bloggers Analysis
- Why isn't there a playoff? | Bloggers Analysis
- The Programs About To Blow Up | Bloggers Analysis
- Does The Longhorn Network Matter? | Bloggers Analysis
- What'll Happen In Ten Years? | Bloggers Analysis
- When Should Players Turn Pro? | Bloggers Analysis
- What's Your Beef? The Biggest Complaints | Bloggers Analysis

LIMITED TIME ONLY: CLICK HERE for a Free Week of Top-Rated Selections

- Suggestions or something we missed? Let us know
- Follow us ... http://twitter.com/ColFootballNews