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Bloggers - Really, why isn't there a playoff?

CollegeFootballNews.com
Posted Aug 22, 2011


From the CFN bloggers, here are their thoughts on all the important topics going into the 2011 college football season.


State of the Game - Bloggers

Why isn't there a playoff?


2011 CFN State of the Game Topics  
- Should The Death Penalty Be On The Table? 
- What One Thing Can Stop The Cheating? | Bloggers Analysis
- How To Fix The NCAA | Bloggers Analysis
- Is There Institutional Control? | Bloggers Analysis
- The Cam Newton Situation | Bloggers Analysis
Was Stanley McClover Telling The Truth? | Bloggers Analysis
Should Players Get a Bigger Stipend? | Bloggers Analysis
- Should a one-loss SEC team play for it all? | Bloggers Analysis
- Why isn't there a playoff? | Bloggers Analysis
- The Programs About To Blow Up | Bloggers Analysis
- Does The Longhorn Network Matter? | Bloggers Analysis
- What'll Happen In Ten Years? | Bloggers Analysis
- When Should Players Turn Pro? | Bloggers Analysis
- What's Your Beef? The Biggest Complaints | Bloggers Analysis

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By David Sweigart
The simple answer is m-o-n-e-y… Not the money that would be earned from college football having a playoff though. The current BCS deal signed by university presidents is why there is no college football playoff right now. The BCS contract runs out after ESPN exclusively shows the 2013 national championship, only then can the debate of restructuring the BCS and having a playoff even be brought to the table as a possible change to the post season.

By Gabe Harris
Because the presidents and athletic directors at the BCS conferences do not want to share playoff money with the Boise States of the NCAA. If four superconferences form then a playoff will follow as the four will then want their own playoff. They will have the number of teams they feel deserve the opportunity and that is when you will see the BCS go bye-bye.

By Phil Harrison
A lot of people like to point to money as the reason. I can agree to a point. It is about the money, but only in respect to who it goes to. If you haven’t noticed, the bowl system currently in place, along with the BCS is a “good ‘ole boy” network. Those relationships run deep within the ranks from the bowl officials, to the athletic directors, all the way up to the college presidents. The amount of money that a college football playoff would generate would be off the charts, but it would also be outside of the grubby hands of the folks creating the “playoff block” in the current model. It would have to be an ugly, public divorce before these assets are divided. Root out the entrenched people in control, and maybe progress can be made towards heavenly playoff bliss.

By Nico Roesler

No matter how much I get frustrated with the BCS, a playoff doesn’t seem to work in my mind. The revenue simply isn’t there like it is for bowl games. Imagine your team is the Texas A&M Aggies. Your first round game is against Oregon State and will be played in the Rose Bowl. How many of your fans are going to make that trip? Will tickets sell for a game between the teams who would otherwise have no reason to play in LA? If A&M fans do show for that game and the Aggies win, how many fans will then follow the team to, say, Denver for the second rounds regional match up? Who in Denver will care about A&M playing at Mile High stadium? Then, imagine A&M wins to advance to the semifinals against Alabama in New York? The logistics of getting tickets sold to each game and creating the experience that bowl games create for players, families, and fans do not compare. The tournament brackets would not be able to match what college basketball has accomplished. The matchups will be too spread out for consistent fan follow wherever the games go.

By Terry Johnson
College football coaches, whether they admit or not, oppose a playoff. Under the existing system, a team can finish the season with six wins and end the season with a bowl game. Bowl games allow coaches extra practices that they can use to evaluate future players. No coach wants to give up bowl practices, particularly the non-BCS schools.

By Matthew Peaslee
The two best teams in college football should play each other at the end of the season to determine the National Champion. That is why the BCS was created. Acting as an almost de-facto playoff, the regular season of a college football schedule is the most important in all of sports. That uniqueness is what sets college football apart and what the NCAA leaders enjoy. Also, wanting to keep with the tradition and importance of the post-season bowl games, the installation of a playoff system would all but destroy that legitimacy of the games that have always been a mainstay of the holiday season.

By Randall Gyorko
Money. ESPN owns bowl week and carries what seems like 90% of the Bowl Games. They are in control of college football right now. They are the goose and the gander. Plus, I have yet to find one season in recent memory which had up to 8 (let alone 16 or more as proposed) teams worthy of being called the best.

By Bradlee Simoneaux
As one of the few people still in full support of the bowl system as it stands now, I absolutely do not want the system to change. I hear people talk all the time about how college football has a mythical national champion. Would you rather the 9-7 New York Giants win the Super Bowl? Or how about one of the many Final Four spoilers of late be the NCAA Basketball National Champion? The reason college football is still the greatest game around is because each and every game during the regular season is so important. No college team can take two or three weeks off, and then get hot at the end of the season, maybe get a lucky draw in the playoffs and win the whole ball of wax. Any mistake or lack of awareness from week to week could spell doom for the hopes of any given team. While there might not be a perfect system to decide the national champion, I will still take it over any other sport in the country with the two teams that played the best in the regular season and deserved it the most getting to play for the national title. Sure, some years the third best team may sneak in and cause some controversy, but is that worse than a 12 seed making it to the NCAA Basketball Championship or a 6 seed making it to the Super Bowl? Hardly, the only thing a playoff will accomplish is the dilution of the importance of each and every week in college football, and I for one would not trade that for anything.
 
By Bart Doan
Because the people who run college football are purely brilliant businessmen (and women). College football, more than any other sport at any other level is a year round brand. Think about it, when any sport, pro or college ends, there’s a 48 hour window where the game or finals are talked about, and then its crickets until preseason. Not in college football, my friends. When the season ends, there’s 30% of the sports fan base that thinks the end result is completely up for debate, 30% that thinks the title will be stripped in 5 years, and 40% that might be okay with it. The debate rages on until (forever?) at least preseason. On top of that, do yourself a favor and delve into the BCS finances. When the BCS contract was sold back in 1999, it went for $25 million total, for all of the games. After 2011? It was worth $25 million still. PER GAME. That’s an increase in just over a decade of 500% financially. The game has put more fannies in the seat since then, more merch sales, higher TV ratings, higher and more of everything. If you think the BCS doesn’t “work,” you need another course in Business 101. If you think a financial increase of 500% in a decade isn’t worth keeping the controversy around, I’ll see you Saturday morning for some snipe hunting. The theory that a playoff would generate even more money is completely idiotic. Logistics would be a nightmare, and the numbers bear it out. 500%. Keep it rolling.

By Brian Harbach

College football conferences have never been on an equal playing field and until that happens there will not be a college football playoff. In the past teams like the B1G and Pac 12 did not have conference championships and promoted the BCS because it was easier for their conference to make a BCS Championship game in that format. Is it easier to win all your games with or without a championship game against a really good opponent?

Some conferences made a calculated decision based on selfish reasons to deny a playoff and argue that the Rose Bowl would be harmed and the Rose Bowl is most important to them. Interestingly enough the B1G and Pac 12 are now more willing to go to a Plus-One since they both will have a championship game for the first time in 2011.

There is no way to agree to a playoff format when there is not one format in any of the BCS leagues. Four conferences now have Championship games, two will use a combination of conference record/tiebreakers and the Non-BCS leagues want the opportunity to prove they belong. The NFL playoff system works because there are eight divisions made up of equal amount of teams. Those teams play the same amount of games before the postseason and play the same amount at home and on the road.

Regular season success is rewarded with a home field advantage, playing teams with softer records in early rounds and in some cases a bye week to rest. How can college football fairly compare a team that play twelve games vs. a team that play thirteen. Boise State faces one, maybe two ranked opponents a season…the SEC Champion will play anywhere from five to seven ranked opponents. There is no such thing as an apple to apples comparison in college football and conferences will not agree to one playoff format if there isn’t even one conference format.

There will never be a college football playoff until there a mandated conference format and it is unlikely that the every FBS play in a conference that the decision makers deem equal.

By Marc Basham
Ladies and gentlemen, I have an unpopular confession to make. I am a supporter of the BCS and the bowl system. I know, I know, supporting the BCS is like supporting Casey Anthony in the eyes of college football fans, but hear me out. The one major problem college football has with implementing a playoff at this time is the methodology of selecting playoff teams. This would not be your typical Selection Sunday. While the conference champions would gain an automatic bid, the push for at-large slots would be ridiculous. Where would one draw the line? What criteria would they use to differentiate between a two-loss Louisville and a three-loss Oklahoma State? Would a one-loss non-BCS school even have a chance at getting a slot, even if that loss wasn't that bad? The criteria would be starting from scratch, and the backlash for exclusion would be great. Also, unlike in March Madness the likelihood of the ever-popular Cinderella is highly unlikely. Sure, every now and then the Sun Belt or MAC champion may squeak by the Big East or ACC champion in the first round, but don't expect to find a Butler or VCU amongst Troy and Southern Mississippi. Finally, and the primary reason there isn't a playoff, money. So much money is invested into the current BCS format, with decade-long sponsorship deals, TV deals, stadium deals, etc, that completely scrapping it is not likely. Until these issues are settles, I'm content with the yearly controversy over BCS rankings and deserving teams. After all, it makes the Thanksgiving dinner table way more entertaining every year.

2011 CFN State of the Game Topics  
- Should The Death Penalty Be On The Table? 
- What One Thing Can Stop The Cheating? | Bloggers Analysis
- How To Fix The NCAA | Bloggers Analysis
- Is There Institutional Control? | Bloggers Analysis
- The Cam Newton Situation | Bloggers Analysis
Was Stanley McClover Telling The Truth? | Bloggers Analysis
Should Players Get a Bigger Stipend? | Bloggers Analysis
- Should a one-loss SEC team play for it all? | Bloggers Analysis
- Why isn't there a playoff? | Bloggers Analysis
- The Programs About To Blow Up | Bloggers Analysis
- Does The Longhorn Network Matter? | Bloggers Analysis
- What'll Happen In Ten Years? | Bloggers Analysis
- When Should Players Turn Pro? | Bloggers Analysis
- What's Your Beef? The Biggest Complaints | Bloggers Analysis

LIMITED TIME ONLY: CLICK HERE for a Free Week of Top-Rated Selections

- Suggestions or something we missed? Let us know
- Follow us ... http://twitter.com/ColFootballNews