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Bloggers - Does the Longhorn Network Matter?

CollegeFootballNews.com
Posted Aug 22, 2011


From the CFN bloggers, here are their thoughts on all the important topics going into the 2011 college football season.


State of the Game - Bloggers

The Longhorn Network


2011 CFN State of the Game Topics  
- Should The Death Penalty Be On The Table? 
- What One Thing Can Stop The Cheating? | Bloggers Analysis
- How To Fix The NCAA | Bloggers Analysis
- Is There Institutional Control? | Bloggers Analysis
- The Cam Newton Situation | Bloggers Analysis
Was Stanley McClover Telling The Truth? | Bloggers Analysis
Should Players Get a Bigger Stipend? | Bloggers Analysis
- Should a one-loss SEC team play for it all? | Bloggers Analysis
- Why isn't there a playoff? | Bloggers Analysis
- The Programs About To Blow Up | Bloggers Analysis
- Does The Longhorn Network Matter? | Bloggers Analysis
- What'll Happen In Ten Years? | Bloggers Analysis
- When Should Players Turn Pro? | Bloggers Analysis
- What's Your Beef? The Biggest Complaints | Bloggers Analysis

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By David Sweigart
For Texas fans, the Longhorn network is a great opportunity. The deal with ESPN gives Texas more money annually so it is very difficult to argue that it is a negative as a Longhorn. If you are not a Texas fan and are a fan of a team that competes against them in the Big12 then it is not a good thing for your university. Texas A&M is making their frustration known publicly. Oklahoma knows this only strengthens their rival. For the rest of the teams in the Big12, the extra money Texas receives from this deal just widens the large financial gap already between them. The impact of the Longhorn network is a hot topic inside of the Big12 but nationally it is not much of an issue. However, in the future if Texas plans for entry to the Pac12 conference, they will likely have to restructure their TV deal. Texas could also eventually go Independent and do whatever they like with the network.

By Gabe Harris
It’s a little of all three. It’s a good thing because it will help create a playoff in that the divide between the haves and have nots will grow because as conferences change their money will go up while smaller conferences will stay the same. It’s a negative because it does create a recruiting advantage and ESPN will have more control over the sport than they should have. It’s also neither because this will not really effect the SEC or Pac-12. Their schools make almost as much money as Texas (especially when the SEC expands and gets to renegotiate TV contracts) and there is a point of diminishing returns.

By Marc Basham
It is hard to argue against the idea that Texas is the hotbed of high school football talent, waiting to be plucked by every football powerhouse in the country. Therefore, one can't blame the Longhorns for trying to gain a competitive recruiting advantage in their home state by establishing the Longhorn Network. After all, the world of college football recruiting is a cutthroat one, where everyone looks for the extra advantage, right? In the case of Texas having its own network, the line has officially been crossed into a world of unfair advantages. While fairness in recruiting is a thin, thin line that is frequently crossed, having the Longhorn Network provides Texas with an advantage that other teams could find hard to surpass. Now, I'm not talking about advantages over North Texas and Rice, those are and will always be a given. I'm speaking about advantages over major rivals such as Oklahoma and Texas A&M. Increased exposure to an already over-exposed program could easily saturate the recruiting market in that region, putting other Big XII schools at a major recruiting disadvantage, and ultimately lead to the demise of the conference. Those are issues that will put the Lone Star State up in arms.

By Terry Johnson
Texas owning its own network is not necessarily a bad thing. It’s just too bad that ESPN is running it.

By Phil Harrison
Stop the madness. How many more cable networks can spring up before it starts to be an overpriced commodity with watered down programming. Who really wants to watch the Texas Longhorn chess club take two out of three from Oklahoma to win the greatest mind bender in all of college sports? That’s before we even talk about the separation that starts to happen when your big money schools latch on to this idea and become even bigger powerhouses because of the revenue and exposure that results. The NCAA needs to step in and put a stop to this now before we have the Lions, Tigers, and Bear networks. Oh my.

By Nico Roesler
The Longhorn Network is a good thing for college football. It is a good thing for the Big 12 and it is a good thing for the Texas Longhorns. At the end of last summer, the Longhorns were the glue to the Big 12’s dismantling puzzle. The Longhorn Network followed as the nice glaze to the puzzle making everything clear for the Big 12 – the conference can survive, as long as Texas is part of it. The network, despite the disputes between A&M and the Longhorns over televised high school games, will benefit recruiting throughout the conference. Schools like Kansas can now recruit even harder in Texas with the incentive to players that their home state will be watching as Texas travels to the Lawrence’s and the Manhattan’s of the Big 12. The network shows that college athletics can have the revenue power to create its own niche markets. And it is good for the Longhorns because, well, why wouldn’t you like a TV station dedicated to your favorite school?

By Jon Berke
It’s good if you like giant conferences. I think the Longhorn network will almost certainly lead to the eventual dissolution of the Big 12, which will force other conferences to pick up the pieces where the fall. The real positive from that is the ‘SuperConferences’ could actually cause a push towards a playoff.

By Brian Harbach

The Big Ten Network was good for college football and for Big Ten fans because it promoted a conference and not just a team. It is bad for College Football that ESPN now has a financial stake in the success of Texas. People like watching winners, so it would be in ESPN’s benefit to promote games between the Longhorns and some also-ran out of conference team.

There will now be some perceived bias every time during ESPN’s BCS countdown show that Texas is getting a pump in their analyst rankings because the network wants them to be ranked higher. College football fans love a conspiracy and the Longhorn Network could end up being the new public enemy number one. Pat Forde created the Bus last year for Boise and was killed for his Pro-Bronco agenda. ESPN just created an entire network for the University of Texas, how do you think people will react to that?

By Matthew Peaslee
An exclusive television network for the Longhorns would be a great thing, if they were Independent. Because Texas is a member of the Big 12, for now, it shouldn’t have the power to generate boatloads of revenue and exposure through their own network. It’s almost like the capital of the United States moving from Washington D.C. to a larger city like Chicago or Las Angeles. The disparity of the money situations will cause Texas’ power influx to be a negative instance on all of college football.

By Bradlee Simoneaux
It is a very bad thing that Texas is starting its own television network. First of all, there are already way too many channels on television, and I do not believe many national carriers are going to carry a television station that does not even broadcast major college football games. Even the Longhorn alumni that live in New York or California are probably not going to tune in regularly to watch the array of non-revenue producing sports that Texas offers. Another reason of why it is bad is that this makes it very likely that Texas can eventually go Independent. As someone who believes Notre Dame and BYU should be forced to join a conference or be left out of the NCAA, I do not want to see any more teams take this route. I think it is bad for the game and bad because of the lack of quality matchups that will occur compared to those that teams in conferences go up against on a weekly basis.

By Bart Doan
It’s an atrocious ordeal. It’s the blue Pepsi of college football. The sport is already screwed up enough with networks in bed with conferences, now they’re allowing it to happen with individual teams? Oye vey. If you read the actual language of the contract, Texas has the authority to tell ESPN when it doesn’t approve of the way something is being reported on the Longhorn Network. So if you’re Texas A&M and you win the rivalry game, don’t expect the score to be scrolling across the bottom of the TLN ticker, I suppose.

Also, the contract basically absolves any opportunity for the Big 12 to create its own network, thus rendering it behind even the Mountain West for crying out loud. It’s a complete death sentence on the conference as a whole. Then you’ve got the matter that stipulates that ESPN will do everything reasonably possible to televise the Texas State High School Championship Game. Nope, nothing remotely slanted about that, right? Other schools in Texas may as well just give up. If Texas is 12-1 and ranked #3 and West Virginia is 12-0 and ranked #2, WVU can just look forward to playing for 3rd place. The contract stipulates it, remember? No negative Texas reporting. That might be an embellishment, but in a sport where perception is total and complete reality, networks in bed with schools has collusion written all stinking over it. Notre Dame gets overrated yearly being on NBC, which is bathwater compared to the raging public-opinion ocean of ESPN. It’s going downhill in college football, fast. Texas just figured out how to be on top of the highest mountain when the floods start coming in.

By Randall Gyorko
It’s an unbelievable negative for everyone but Texas. This is an extreme help to Texas’s already sterling recruiting base. The more people that are exposed to your brand, the more talent that will flock your way. Reference Miami back in the day. They went from unheard of and uncared about to THEE place to play and THEE team to root for. Texas having its own network, with backing of ESPN, has already caused issues and they will continue to do so as long as the network exists.

2011 CFN State of the Game Topics  
- Should The Death Penalty Be On The Table? 
- What One Thing Can Stop The Cheating? | Bloggers Analysis
- How To Fix The NCAA | Bloggers Analysis
- Is There Institutional Control? | Bloggers Analysis
- The Cam Newton Situation | Bloggers Analysis
Was Stanley McClover Telling The Truth? | Bloggers Analysis
Should Players Get a Bigger Stipend? | Bloggers Analysis
- Should a one-loss SEC team play for it all? | Bloggers Analysis
- Why isn't there a playoff? | Bloggers Analysis
- The Programs About To Blow Up | Bloggers Analysis
- Does The Longhorn Network Matter? | Bloggers Analysis
- What'll Happen In Ten Years? | Bloggers Analysis
- When Should Players Turn Pro? | Bloggers Analysis
- What's Your Beef? The Biggest Complaints | Bloggers Analysis

LIMITED TIME ONLY: CLICK HERE for a Free Week of Top-Rated Selections

- Suggestions or something we missed? Let us know
- Follow us ... http://twitter.com/ColFootballNews