Fiu, Cirminiello, Mitchell on TV - Campus Insiders | Buy College Football Tickets

Bloggers - When Should Players Turn Pro?

CollegeFootballNews.com
Posted Aug 22, 2011


From the CFN bloggers, here are their thoughts on all the important topics going into the 2011 college football season.


State of the Game - Bloggers

When should players turn pro?


2011 CFN State of the Game Topics  
- Should The Death Penalty Be On The Table? 
- What One Thing Can Stop The Cheating? | Bloggers Analysis
- How To Fix The NCAA | Bloggers Analysis
- Is There Institutional Control? | Bloggers Analysis
- The Cam Newton Situation | Bloggers Analysis
Was Stanley McClover Telling The Truth? | Bloggers Analysis
Should Players Get a Bigger Stipend? | Bloggers Analysis
- Should a one-loss SEC team play for it all? | Bloggers Analysis
- Why isn't there a playoff? | Bloggers Analysis
- The Programs About To Blow Up | Bloggers Analysis
- Does The Longhorn Network Matter? | Bloggers Analysis
- What'll Happen In Ten Years? | Bloggers Analysis
- When Should Players Turn Pro? | Bloggers Analysis
- What's Your Beef? The Biggest Complaints | Bloggers Analysis

LIMITED TIME ONLY: CLICK HERE for a Free Week of Top-Rated Selections

- Suggestions or something we missed? Let us know
- Follow us ... http://twitter.com/ColFootballNews

By Terry Johnson
I would allow players to enter the draft as soon as they want to enter. The NFL can make the determination whether or not the player is ready to play at the professional level.

By Randall Gyorko
I’ve long been a fan of the MLB model. I fully support any person over the age of 18 having the ability to earn a living doing whatever it is they wish, as long as someone will pay them to do so. However, if you decide that college is the route you wish you go, you must stay for a minimum of three years (after your high school graduating class graduates). If you redshirt, you’re eligible after your Sophomore Season. If you play right away, you can go to the NFL after your Junior Year. It puts an onus on the NFL people to make the right choice, or they are handcuffing their franchise. It forces the player to make the right decision, and then it forces him to own up to his responsibilities as a student athlete. Win/Win.

By David Sweigart
Under the current rules, a prospect may not enter the NFL draft until he is three-years removed from high school. That means an athlete may declare for the NFL draft only after his junior (redshirt sophomore) season is complete. Currently a prospective NBA player can enter the draft after one year of college and an athlete may enter the MLB draft during the spring of his senior year. Out of the big three pro organizations, the NFL demands the most physical maturity and advancement of technical skills of young players. The current system in place is one that not only works; it benefits the student-athlete, the college game of football, and the NFL. With the change in the rookie pay scale being implemented this summer, it is of even more importance that those who desire a chance to test the NFL draft market are properly educated on their status with the league. This is an area that the NCAA, NFL, and universities can all provide more support and education so that rogue street agents and runners are no longer convincing young men to prematurely enter the draft. Leaving school early to become a 7th round pick or undrafted free agent is a dangerous financial proposition and that fact must be hammered home to those thinking of making the jump to the NFL before they are ready.

By Gabe Harris
Players should be allowed to turn pro after they have been out of high school for three years (just as it is now) but I would change up the draft. If you have graduated or completed your playing eligibility then you are eligible to be drafted in the first round; if you are an early entry then you cannot be drafted until the 3rd round of the NFL draft.

By Jon Berke
The college-to-pro track for football is probably the best set-up for bringing amateurs into the professional ranks out of the major sports. The rigors of the NFL have been highlighted all-too-effectively in recent months.

By Brian Harbach

There are not many things you can say College Football does perfectly but this might be the one exception. It makes perfect sense for CFB players to wait three years after high school before being eligible for the NFL draft. Pro baseball and basketball are not nearly the physical sports that football is and in many cases young men from the ages 17-21 are still growing.

It makes sense from an NFL standpoint to want to wait for the players to be a little older so they can have a better feeling of what the player will become. It makes sense from a College standpoint because teams get to build with players for at least three years and it makes sense from a fan standpoint as they get to enjoy these young men play for a good part of their college careers.

By Matthew Peaslee
There are relatively two options for a young man pursuing a baseball career to turn pro. Right out of high school, they can choose to sign a professional contract, if drafted. If a high schooler chooses to go to college instead, he must wait three years before signing that contract. College football should be set up the same. Now, it’s hard to adjust from the high school game to the pros, so that clause should be scratched. But, the three year plan is the best way for a player to get the college experience and start to shape himself as a man before making the jump to pro ball.

By Nico Roesler
Players should be allowed to turn pro only after their fourth season in college football. Anything less than that takes the college basketball mindset of one-and-done’s and expands it to college football. A player set on making it pro will not take classes and academics seriously if he knows he can leave after two or three years. Not only that, but players need as much development as possible before entering the NFL. The added time in college would create further stability for college programs in that they can offer these players annual scholarships without fear that they will leave. 12.

By Bradlee Simoneaux
Players should not be allowed to turn pro until they graduate college. The NFL Draft should be full of Seniors every year while a few Juniors who are able to graduate early would also be able to enter their names in the hat. While it is a known fact that the longevity of NFL careers is very short, for that very reason all players that receive scholarships to attend school for free should be required to fulfill that commitment and graduate from the university. Most likely they are going to need that to fall back on within a couple of years.

By Marc Basham
Breaking news – Terrell Pryor is getting screwed. With the controversy surrounding his entry into the NFL Supplemental Draft following his ousting at Ohio State amid scandal, the NFL has been reluctant to allow the former Buckeye to participate in this month's Supplemental Draft. But why? From an outsiders view it would seem that Pryor's situation fits exactly in the boundaries of the Supplemental Draft. Why is Roger Goodell denying Pryor's request? While the question may soon be resolved, with a meeting between the two in the works, this is not the first time an Ohio State star had issues turning pro. Recall Maurice Clarett's attempt at entering the NFL following a successful freshman campaign in Columbus. Still, despite multiple attempts by Buckeye stars to circumnavigate the draft system, the current 'third year' method has been a fairly successful one, with little controversy to speak of. As the old saying goes, 'if it ain't broke, don't fix it.' While the process may need a little WD-40 to smooth things over, the system is not broke and should remain viable for years to come.

By Phil Harrison
My initial thought was to say whenever they darn well pleased, but with football, you need to be ready. There is no age limit on tennis, golf, baseball, soccer, and tiddlywinks, yet there is one for the NFL? I say it makes sense in this case however, and the point of sale is safety. As we find out more and more about concussions and the effect of playing such an aggressive, contact laden sport, I think it makes sense to let the body mature both physically and mentally before jumping right into the shark tank. I like it right where the line is drawn and wouldn’t change the barometer either way. Besides, selfishly, I’d hate to see college football be watered down in the same fashion that college basketball has been.
 
By Bart Doan
In high school, I had a buddy who could do just about anything to a car. Everyone in our graduating class knew that if anything was wrong with their vehicle, he could diagnose it in the parking lot before school in under 10 minutes. Then, he could fix it afterwards so you could get home by dinner. He was an average student at best. Everyone knew he was bound to be a mechanic, maybe open his own garage one day. When he was 16, he got a job changing oil at one of those quickie lube joints. When he was 18, right after we graduated, he took a job in a garage. By the time he was 25, he was managing the place. No one told him he needed an arbitrary year of school, or any fancy pieces of paper framed on his wall. He had talent, and that was enough.

There were 40 other kids who probably made similar decisions and didn’t pan out like that, over-rating their talent as opposed to their results. Oh well. Players should be allowed to pursue their futures whenever they feel they are ready. If they make a mistake, well, that’s part of life. But no one’s telling a great mechanic, carpenter, writer, or actor that they need to be a certain age to jump into the fire. Greed is the only reason the rule is held up in athletics. Let ‘em go pro whenever they want.

2011 CFN State of the Game Topics  
- Should The Death Penalty Be On The Table? 
- What One Thing Can Stop The Cheating? | Bloggers Analysis
- How To Fix The NCAA | Bloggers Analysis
- Is There Institutional Control? | Bloggers Analysis
- The Cam Newton Situation | Bloggers Analysis
Was Stanley McClover Telling The Truth? | Bloggers Analysis
Should Players Get a Bigger Stipend? | Bloggers Analysis
- Should a one-loss SEC team play for it all? | Bloggers Analysis
- Why isn't there a playoff? | Bloggers Analysis
- The Programs About To Blow Up | Bloggers Analysis
- Does The Longhorn Network Matter? | Bloggers Analysis
- What'll Happen In Ten Years? | Bloggers Analysis
- When Should Players Turn Pro? | Bloggers Analysis
- What's Your Beef? The Biggest Complaints | Bloggers Analysis

LIMITED TIME ONLY: CLICK HERE for a Free Week of Top-Rated Selections

- Suggestions or something we missed? Let us know
- Follow us ... http://twitter.com/ColFootballNews