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Bloggers - What's your beef? The complaints

CollegeFootballNews.com
Posted Aug 22, 2011


From the CFN bloggers, here are their thoughts on all the important topics going into the 2011 college football season.


State of the Game - Bloggers

What's your beef?


2011 CFN State of the Game Topics  
- Should The Death Penalty Be On The Table? 
- What One Thing Can Stop The Cheating? | Bloggers Analysis
- How To Fix The NCAA | Bloggers Analysis
- Is There Institutional Control? | Bloggers Analysis
- The Cam Newton Situation | Bloggers Analysis
Was Stanley McClover Telling The Truth? | Bloggers Analysis
Should Players Get a Bigger Stipend? | Bloggers Analysis
- Should a one-loss SEC team play for it all? | Bloggers Analysis
- Why isn't there a playoff? | Bloggers Analysis
- The Programs About To Blow Up | Bloggers Analysis
- Does The Longhorn Network Matter? | Bloggers Analysis
- What'll Happen In Ten Years? | Bloggers Analysis
- When Should Players Turn Pro? | Bloggers Analysis
- What's Your Beef? The Biggest Complaints | Bloggers Analysis

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By Nico Roesler
My biggest beef with college football is that every year, the question creeps into my head about whether or not the best team was named National Champion. It is impossible to know in the current BCS system. A playoff gives the feeling that the better team advances each round and eventually, the team that deserved it wins. But in today’s bowl arrangement, it never fails to plague my conscious when I wonder what would happen if the winner of the Fiesta Bowl played the Rose Bowl champ. Or what would happen if the winner of the Cotton Bowl played the winner of the Orange Bowl? These things cannot be answered for me now, but hopefully in the near future they will be.
 
By Terry Johnson
Any player that leaves school early without a diploma should reimburse the school for the tuition. This will encourage the student-athletes to study hard and to behave, so that they would not be on hook for tuition.

By Bradlee Simoneaux
The worst and best thing about college football is actually the same entity. ESPN. Sure, this network shows a plethora of games every week, and who could live without SportsCenter or Dr. Lou on College Football Final to wrap up the day’s highlights? But, the problem is that so many people watch and listen to what the talking heads on ESPN have to say, and when these people are AP and Harris Poll voters and coaches then we have a problem. Sure, these analysts are supposed to be non-biased, and for the most part many of them do a great job, but they are human, and all college football fans have inherent biases towards certain teams or conferences. The fact that their opinions could single-handedly determine the rankings shift from week to week is a major problem, and with no major competition out there this problem is not going away any time soon.
 
 By Randall Gyorko
I know this may come as a shock, but my biggest beef with college football is The Worldwide Leader in Sports, ESPN. Let’s face it. ESPN controls college football. Only in a world where common sense prevails can you have analysts that openly support teams (coincidentally enough teams that have massive Television deals with ESPN) on television telling people who should be voted where and why. It doesn’t matter if it makes sense. Take for instance, Kirk Herbstreit. During the 2006 season, Herbie was trumpeting an Ohio State-Michigan rematch. The Big Ten Network didn’t exist yet. He didn’t think Florida deserved it. Then, in 2007 (the crazy year), he openly (on the air) said that Georgia didn’t belong in the National Championship Game because they didn’t win their conference. He stated that if you aren’t the best team in your conference, how can you call yourself the best team in the nation? It’s a great question. Which brings me to the day of the SEC Championship Game last year, where said (on the air again) that he’d vote Auburn into the National Championship Game, even if they lost that evening to South Carolina. It’s no secret that the ESPN and the SEC had signed a massive television deal and were in bed together as a money printing mega-machine. I have a major problem with a system that is based on subjectivity and perception when determining its Champion, being held hostage by the one network that broadcasts the majority of the games. ESPN is doing more harm to the credibility of college football (Look at Craig James for Pete’s sake) for their own personal agenda.

By Matthew Peaslee
No conference was safe from the heated talks of expansion of their respective Media Days. However, the conference sitting in the hottest seat has to be the Big East. As the smallest conference, and what would seem less threatening compared to the other BCS conferences, expansion or even shriveling are thoughts of solutions to the whipping boy conference. John Marrinatto is being proactive in his research and plans as he has reached out to commissioners of other leagues while they have stayed put. Marinatto realizes the struggle that is surely ahead and if he can combat it now, he can save the Big East. By landing a lucrative television deal, first and foremost, he can save the conference and maybe attract some loose ends of other conferences searching for their best fit. The PAC-12 led off the conference reshaping in underdog fashion, who’s to say the Big East can’t pull off much of the same.

By Gabe Harris
This is an easy one and I’m sure a common one…get rid of preseason polls! There isn’t another sport in existence that puts this much weight on subjective thinking. Don’t get me wrong, they are fun to talk about but they have no place in competitive athletics. And talk about a conflict of interest when the people who are coaching the teams determine who plays for the best bowl games!?! When a playoff comes they will no longer matter and only serve as a diversion which is how it should be.

By Jon Berke
My biggest football beef would probably be the insistent negativity amongst fan bases that has seemed to grow exponentially with the internet. Though fan bases have gained immeasurably from the information and access the web provides, there seems to be a cyclical effect in which fans feed off each other in a downward spiral. It provides little to the game or the national discourse, and it serves only to generate animosity within fans of the same program. It’s a sad state of affairs in many ways, and one of the few things truly negative within such a great sport.

By Brian Harbach

Championship Saturday used to be something special, playing on the last Saturday of the season used to mean that your team accomplished something and all the national attention was on your program and your opponents. Now it is become bastardized by CFB Athletic Directors who want to extend their league season a week for no other reason than wanting an extra bye week.

Don’t believe it…well explain how traditional rivalries like Connecticut vs. South Florida needs to be played the same day as the SEC Championship. It must have been a very difficult decision for some fans to flip back and forth between the Big XII Championship game between Nebraska and Oklahoma with the Boise State vs. Utah State game on at the same time last year. Obviously Championship Saturday has become a joke and teams are looking for extra rest during the season by playing when they shouldn’t.

College Football has always had an issue with fairness in the minds of its fans…this is not going to become another attempt to blow up the “Bus” but how is it fair that the Big XII play twelve regular season games in thirteen weeks while Boise State gets to do it in fourteen. The Big East is just as culpable and in some cases worse because their rivalry games aren’t even played the last weekend of the year. USC/UCLA had enough class to play the last week last year but Pitt/West Virginia isn’t either team’s last opponent of the regular season.

Championship Saturday is not just another weekend of the College Football Season; it is a day that should highlight accomplishments of leagues that challenge their teams to play one more game against the best the league has to offer. It has been stained by Boise State vs. New Mexico State (2009), Fresno State vs. Illinois (2010) and Syracuse vs. Pittsburgh (2011). Look at the slate of games scheduled for December 3rd 2011 and it is obvious the games that have no business being played that day. Knock it off NCAA; shut this garbage down now.

By Marc Basham
In the past few years the NCAA has undergone a TV ad campaign in an attempt to portray the student athlete in a more studious, academic light. This, sadly, is not necessarily the case in real life. The world of college football has undergone a major shift in the past two decades, from a strictly student-oriented activity to a billion dollar business. While this was to be expected with the rising popularity of the sport, fears that the education of the student athletes would be cast aside in favor of what pads the bottom-line most successfully have been realized. The athletes fortunate enough to have earned this opportunity are taking their education for granted. Fortunately, the NCAA is recognizing this issue, and recently agreed upon new standards for APR ratings that all schools must uphold. Still, the culture of greed within the business of college football is spilling over onto the football field, providing for a tumultuous atmosphere on the field. Until the primary focus of college football returns to the needs of the student athlete and their true reason for being at the university, scandals will continue to rock the college football world, and the culture of noncompliance will continue to rule the scene.

By David Sweigart
The wide spread uncovering of scandals involving programs around the country is putting a black eye on college football. In the last year, college football scandals have been made public at an alarming rate. UNC suffered serious suspensions prior to the start of the 2010 season for a variety of issues including agent relations and an academic scandal. South Carolina lost a player that was a part of the agent party in Miami and is currently still under investigation for players staying in a hotel. AJ Green was suspended the first four games of the season for selling a jersey and Marcel Dareus missed the first two games for also attending a party in Miami. Cam Newton and Auburn have been accused of participating in a serious pay-for-play deal. The Ohio State tattoo scandal cost Jim Tressell his job and Terrelle Pryor his senior season. Ohio St also has 4 other players suspended for the first five games of the 2011 season. Oregon is being investigated for the payment of $25,000 to Will Lyles for bunk recruiting information. Georgia Tech was recently stripped of its 2009 ACC title. Alabama players are rumored to be involved in a suit scandal as well as autographing merchandise that was later put on display and sold at the same men’s wear store. News this week broke about “renegade booster” Nevin Shapiro providing a laundry list of illicit benefits to players at the University of Miami from 2002 to 2010. This is perhaps the biggest story yet and the fall out is impossible to project at this moment in time, however it looks bad….Really bad. I would be putting my head in the sand to think that college football is void of any scandals but lately it seems like a new story is popping up every other week. College football is a great game but the image is being tarnished one scandal at a time.

By Bart Doan
I think it’s been evident throughout most of this question and answer that it has to do with networks, TV ratings, and programs. Start with Ohio State, if we must. The NCAA had no reason to allow Terrelle Pryor and friends to play in the Sugar Bowl, and if they were North Texas in the New Orleans Bowl you know there was no way in h-e-double hockey sticks that it would have happened the way it did. Sponsors paid big bucks to the network, which paid big bucks to the NCAA for a competitive game between schools that dominate the market. A quick look at your television ratings in the BCS era for every bowl shows the same consistency…big name schools, regardless of record, drawing ratings. That has infiltrated a sport where (again) perception is complete reality.

This isn’t college basketball, where eventually you find out whose over-ranked and who got snubbed. It’s not the NFL, NBA, or NHL either. College football is completely dependent on the opinions of others. I’ve talked to one too many newspaper columnists who’ve passed their AP poll off to their secretary, because they realized Monday that they forgot to do it. I’ve talked to one too many coaches who say they don’t have even close to the time it would take to fill out a legit ballot, and pass it on off to their kids, team manager, or anyone within arms reach. I’ve talked to far and away too many voters who admit that it’s impossible to see 25 teams worth voting for on a weekly basis, and just watch highlight shows to get the jest of what went down. And those are the conscientious ones.

And what do those highlight shows that determine votes towards the national championship show? Well, for one, on one particular network, they are bound by contract to read “we go to by far the most dominant conference in college football, the SEC.” It doesn’t matter if it is or not, it helps ratings. Because three years ago when Auburn clearly wasn’t a top 10 team, ratings vs LSU needed them to be, so they were sold that way. Auburn lost 7 games that year. But hey, there was a chance at marketing them as ½ of a battle between “top 10 SEC juggernauts,” so why not just go with it?

College football is rapidly becoming a punch line because of the stranglehold networks have on the perception of teams. If you’re under contract with a network, expect to be over-sold beyond your capability. It’s worth 1 extra loss in a sport where 1 loss sometimes puts you out of a title. Just ask LSU, who magically jumped 5 spots in 1 week to the national title game a few years ago with only TWO of the teams ahead of them losing. Sound fishy? Nah, ratings depended on it. The NCAA has no filter on what they want to make, and the networks have no filter on how far they’re willing to go to muddy the system to make sure they get the extra few dollars. Until that changes, college football is in a complete state of peril. Judging by the state of the nation, I won’t hold my breath on competitive utopia coming anytime soon. The rich get richer and just will continue to squeeze blood from a turnip to fatten their own pockets, at the expense of the game. Take the networks out of the equation, add some fairness. Do you have the guts to do it, NCAA?

By Phil Harrison
I am sure this will be duplicated several times over, but can we PLEASE have a playoff? I love the excitement and adrenaline of March Madness and want to see the same for college football. Can you imagine filling brackets out and getting an opportunity to travel to sites, and have match-ups that you otherwise wouldn’t. Can we just get over whatever it is going against common sense and get this thing done? National credit downgrade move over, Obama needs time to end this filibuster and bring the topic to Capitol Hill.

2011 CFN State of the Game Topics  
- Should The Death Penalty Be On The Table? 
- What One Thing Can Stop The Cheating? | Bloggers Analysis
- How To Fix The NCAA | Bloggers Analysis
- Is There Institutional Control? | Bloggers Analysis
- The Cam Newton Situation | Bloggers Analysis
Was Stanley McClover Telling The Truth? | Bloggers Analysis
Should Players Get a Bigger Stipend? | Bloggers Analysis
- Should a one-loss SEC team play for it all? | Bloggers Analysis
- Why isn't there a playoff? | Bloggers Analysis
- The Programs About To Blow Up | Bloggers Analysis
- Does The Longhorn Network Matter? | Bloggers Analysis
- What'll Happen In Ten Years? | Bloggers Analysis
- When Should Players Turn Pro? | Bloggers Analysis
- What's Your Beef? The Biggest Complaints | Bloggers Analysis

LIMITED TIME ONLY: CLICK HERE for a Free Week of Top-Rated Selections

- Suggestions or something we missed? Let us know
- Follow us ... http://twitter.com/ColFootballNews