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2012 NFL Draft Analysis - WRs No. 11-30
North Carolina WR Dwight Jones
North Carolina WR Dwight Jones
CollegeFootballNews.com
Posted Apr 18, 2012


From a college football perspective, here's the analysis of all the top wide receiver prospects.

2012 NFL Draft Position Rankings

WRs - No. 11-30


By Pete Fiutak

- 2012 NFL Wide Receiver Rankings - Top Ten

11. Joe Adams, Arkansas 5-11, 179
The straight-line speed might not be elite considering his size, but he’s smooth as glass with elite quickness and the ability to break down and destroy defenders in the open field. On-field fast, he can take the top off a defense and produced at a high level as a punt returner. The versatility will be a key to his career with the skills to be a dangerous No. 3 target and a game-changer on special teams. There’s a concern that he only caught three touchdown passes last year even though he was a part of the Arkansas high-octane puzzle, and there were way too many drops. Not physical in any way, he’s slight and should get pushed around by an NFL defensive back. There’s a chance he’ll never be able to get off the line.
CFN Projection: Third Round

12. Stephen Hill, Georgia Tech (Jr.) 6-5, 215
He’s not Demaryius Thomas and he’s certainly not Calvin Johnson, but the tools are way too intriguing to ignore. Not only is he one of the biggest receivers in the draft, but he’s among the fastest clocking in a blazing 4.33. With his upside and talent he should be a mismatch nightmare and he might just be scratching the surface on what he can become. After a rocky start and academic issues he has matured, improved, and is ready to blossom – eventually. He fights the ball way too much and he’s more of a gear-up receiver than a quick one for midrange routes. It might take a little while and a lot of tweaking, but it’s all there to become a dangerous part of any attack. He helped himself in offseason workouts and now will be one of the biggest calls in the first few rounds.
CFN Projection: Second Round

13. Tommy Streeter, Miami (Jr.) 6-5, 219
Very tall and really, really fast, he brings sub-4.4 wheels in the body of a thin tight end. With the frame to add at least 15 more pounds, he could get bigger and still find a nice niche as a devastating deep threat. No, he’ll never block anyone and yes, he’ll be a one-trick pony, but that one trick could be devastating. He’ll be eliminated by anyone who applies a jam on the line, and he’ll never be a full route tree target, but get him on the field, air it out, and let him go run under it. Along the way, though, expect a lot of drops and plenty of mistakes.
CFN Projection: Third Round

14. Nick Toon, Wisconsin 6-1, 215
Extremely safe, there’s a high floor and he’s not going to bust, but there isn’t any one thing he does to stand out. He has a nice blend of size, speed and athleticism, and he can be used in every system and be a smooth producer right out of the box. Hands aren’t a problem, he’s tough, and he’s able to work across the middle and work his way deep. Physical, he’ll block but he’ll also get banged up; he’ll always have to fight through a slew of dings. Some team will be happy to get him in the middle of the draft knowing exactly what it’ll get, but again, there aren’t any elite tools to be anything more than a decent complementary receiver.
CFN Projection: Third Round

15. Dwight Jones, North Carolina 6-4, 230
With a great blend of size, speed, and athleticism, he has the look and he has the tools to become a tough No. 1 receiver. There’s tremendous upside and there’s lots and lots of room to grow into a more polished playmaker. Even though he has the size of a tight end, he’s quick, cuts well, and has the straight-line speed to make things happen down the field. Now he needs to want it. Does he have the fire and the fight to become special, and how much will a coach have to work to keep pushing and coaxing out the talent? While he was ultra-productive for the Tar Heels, he needs to become a better blocker for his size, has to have a can-do attitude, and needs to do all the little things right all the time. He’s a first round talent with fourth round intensity.
CFN Projection: Fourth Round

16. Brian Quick, Appalachian State 6-4, 220
With excellent size and tremendous athleticism, he has the tools including phenomenal leaping ability to get up and make big plays on jump balls. Smooth as silk for his size and gears up well with the ability to blow past defenders once he’s in the clear. A leader, he’ll do whatever he must to improve, and he needs some refinement. While he ended up finishing strong during Senior Bowl week, he didn’t look like he belonged with the big boys early on. The deep speed is there, but he’ll likely be a mid-range target early on. There are too many drops and he’ll need plenty of refinement, but there’s enough to work with to think he could eventually become a dangerous No. 2 target.
CFN Projection: Third Round

17. Marvin Jones, California 6-2, 199
Terrific tools. He proved in offseason workouts that he has strength – ripping off 22 reps at the Combine – sub-4.5 wheels, and excellent hands. He sucks in everything that comes his way and will fight to go after a ball. Always rising to the challenge, he has the exact attitude every coach will love, and he won’t pout if he starts out as a No. 3 target as a piece-of-the-puzzle target. He’ll always be prepared. While he’s not all that quick, he’ll be a good possession receiver who’ll find a way to always get open. No, he might not be the flashiest prospect, but he’ll be a good, sound pro.
CFN Projection: Fourth Round

18. T.Y. Hilton, FIU 5-9, 183
Not big and a wisp, he’s never going to block anyone and he’s never going to get any bigger, but he was an unstoppable all-around playmaker in the Sun Belt as both as a receiver and a returner. Very, very quick, he cuts on a dime and is creative when he gets into the open field. Maxed out on his frame after starting out his career around 150 pounds, he’s tough for his size and he’s not afraid to go across the middle to make the tough grab. Can he last? While he’s not going to shy away from contact, he had a slew of bangs and bruises that he had to fight through. However, he’ll find a role as a part of a passing game and on special teams. He might make a bigger mark as a returner than a target.
CFN Projection: Fourth Round

19. A.J. Jenkins, Illinois 6-0, 190
After falling off the radar a bit, like the rest of the Illini, he showed this offseason that he’s worth a longer look after tearing off a blazing sub-4.4 40 and proving to be an elite athlete. He has the tools, the elite speed, and the smarts to be ready to handle being a No. 2 or 3 receiver in a good passing game. With nice hands to go along with the rest of his tools, he has the talent, but the production was inconsistent with two really, really good weeks; that was about it. The problem will be his size with no ability to get physical whatsoever, and he’ll never block anyone, but that won’t be his job.
CFN Projection: Fourth Round

20. Gerell Robinson, Arizona State 6-3, 227
A great recruit for ASU, he grew into an excellent but unsung playmaker. Big and strong, he also surprised a bit in workouts turning in an under 4.6 40. A good enough deep threat to be useful, he’ll fight for the ball and he’ll get physical down the field to power his way for the ball. The elite athleticism isn’t there and he’s a bit of a one-year wonder – he started to rock when Brock Osweiler started to turn his game up a notch – and now he has to prove he can be consistent. He’s worth a mid-to-late round pick on size alone.
CFN Projection: Fifth Round

21. Patrick Edwards, Houston 5-9, 172
Really, really fast, he has sub-4.4 speed and it all translates to the field as a big-time playmaker who finds ways to get the ball in his hands and do huge things with it. He has the speed to get deep, make things happen on mid-range plays, and he cuts on a dime. Phenomenally productive, he was Case Keenum’s main man and came through even though he often drew the No. 1 assignment from the opposing top defensive back. However, he’s way too small and he’ll never get physical in any way. Can he last? He’ll get lit up by anyone who can pop him, but can anyone catch him? It won’t be a problem finding a job for him in three and four-receiver sets and letting him fly.
CFN Projection: Fourth Round

22. Ryan Broyles, Oklahoma 5-10, 192
While he showed he’s coming back quickly from the torn ACL that cost him the last half of his final year, and he showed great straight-line speed in his pro day, there are still plenty of question marks about whether or not he can hold up. Being hurt is nothing new, though, with a variety of injuries throughout his career. Even so, he was able to produce at the highest of levels, turning out to be the greatest receiver in Oklahoma history. However, the great Sooner receiver in the NFL is … ? Very smart and very quick, he’s crafty and creative when it comes to getting open, and he’s extremely strong for his size. A great college football player, he doesn’t have the elite athleticism or speed to make up for his wiry frame, and if the knee injury cost him even a sliver of quickness he might not be anything more than a backup.
CFN Projection: Fourth Round

23. T.J. Graham, NC State 5-11, 188
Fast, fast, fast, fast, fast. With uncoachable speed, he’s a sub-4.4 guy and it translates to the field. With his wheels he can be used as a kickoff returner or he can find a role as a pure deep threat in four-wide sets. Track star fast, he’s a football player who also runs track and he’s able to grow over his career. However, at the moment he’s not a good all-around receiver with dropping issues; he fights the ball too much at times. This is it size-wise without any room to get any bigger, and he might not need to change anything. All that matters is his speed, and no one’s going to care if he can’t block anyone. No, he’ll never be the centerpiece of a passing game, but some offensive coordinator will love to get a late-round toy to play with.
CFN Projection: Fifth Round

24. DeVier Posey, Ohio State 6-2, 211
Is he going to become a star as a pro? The team’s No. 1 wide receiver, at least when he was on the field, he was never used quite enough in the conservative Buckeye offense. However, he has the right attitude and a top-target mentality in a good way. He wants to be the main man and he’s going to work to be a factor. He has the size and he has the mid-4.4 speed, and he has the hands to become a good, reliable target. Can his skill and tools overcome his knucklehead streak? There weren’t any major problems, but he had booster issues and was part of the Tattoo Five. Throw in his inconsistency on the field and need for a LOT of polish and refinement, and he’ll have to fight to be a factor.
CFN Projection: Fifth Round

25. Keshawn Martin, Michigan State 5-11, 188
Fast and shifty, he’s a terrific returner who could hang on a roster purely as a special teamer. With tremendous quickness, he could light up an NFL defense as a No. 3 or 4 target who’s used to make things happen on the inside. Wiry and thin, he’s not going to block anyone, but that’s not his job. Get him on the field, let him be athletic, and watch him make the big plays needed. Plenty of work will be needed on the finer points of being a receiver, and he might need a little while before he can produce for an attack, but he’s ready out of the box as a kick and punt returner and he’ll grow into an offense with time and energy.
CFN Projection: Fourth Round

26. Eric Page, Toledo (Jr.) 5-9, 186
A terrific MAC star who did a little of everything, he was an unstoppable force at times even when defense keyed on him, and he proved throughout his career that he could be solid return man. Quicker and faster on tape than he is in workouts, he ran a way-too-slow mid-4.5 for a player of his size. Short and already as big as he’s going to get, this is it for his body type. However, he handled himself fine despite getting the ball in a variety of ways and being used over and over again. Not athletic enough, he doesn’t have the elite tools to be a factor. Even so, he’s a versatile enough pure football player to take a late round shot on and hope he makes a team as a returner.
CFN Projection: Fifth Round

27. B.J. Cunningham, Michigan State 6-1, 211
At a school known for cranking out a great receiver prospects, Cunningham was among the most productive of the lot. A go-to receiver in big game after big game, he always rose to the occasion with a nice career. Strong and with nice size and the ability to use it as he outmuscles and fights for plays. A good football player, the raw tools aren’t there with average speed and not enough quickness to blow past any good NFL corner. An okay route runner, he mostly relied on being able to push his way for the ball rather than fly into the open. He’ll find a job as an inside target who’ll make things happen across the middle, but there’s a hard ceiling on what he can become.
CFN Projection: Fifth Round

28. Juron Criner, Arizona 6-2, 224
Really, really slow, he’s better on tape than in workouts. However, that lack of raw wheels puts a hard ceiling on what he can become. Tall, big, and athletic enough to get by, he was great with pro QB prospect Nick Foles and showed he could battle for plays and fight to make things happen, but he’s a much better football player than an athlete. There’s a hard ceiling on what he can become, but he’ll fight for a roster spot and he could be the type of prospect who’ll be just good enough in practices to stick. Don’t be shock if he turns out to be surprisingly effective, even though he’ll hardly be a special playmaker.
CFN Projection: Fifth Round

29. Jermaine Kearse, Washington 6-1, 209
With nice size and good enough speed to get by, the tools are good enough to work with to hope for growth into a decent playmaker. There isn’t any one thing he can do at a high-level in terms of athleticism, but he’s a fighter, a blocker, and will do all the little things a coach wants. The biggest problem is that he was just okay at Washington, rolling for a huge day in the Alamo Bowl shootout against Baylor for his lone 100-yard performance last season. There’s enough talent to give him a long look in a camp, but he doesn’t have any standout skills and could be an easy and quick cut.
CFN Projection: Fifth Round

30. Jordan White, Western Michigan 6-0, 214
Ultra-productive, he came up with 140 catches for 1,911 yards and 17 scores in a season, and before you blow off the numbers because he played in the MAC, he also lit up Michigan, Illinois, and Connecticut. He’s way too slow and he doesn’t have the right body – short and thick – but he’s able to use his strength to fight for the ball. A terrific route runner, he’s always able to work into the open and he doesn’t miss anything that comes his way. With major knee injuries in the past he’ll never be a top athlete, but he can come up with a career in a specialty role as a chain mover. Put him in against zone coverage and he’ll come up with the five-yard catch for the first down.
CFN Projection: Sixth Round

- 2012 NFL Wide Receiver Rankings - Top Ten