2013 NFL Combine - OG Analysis No. 11-25

CollegeFootballNews.com
Posted Feb 18, 2013


Pre-Combine quick looks at the offensive guards invited to Indy. No. 11 to 25

2013 NFL Pre-Combine

OG Rankings - No. 11 to 25


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- 2013 CFN Pre-Combine OG Rankings, The Top Ten 
 
11. Chris Barker, Nevada 6-4, 305 Proj. 6
Pre-Combine Analysis Positives: A great athlete who makes things happen on the move. Extremely quick off the ball, he can be used in space to make the running game go. He’s used to having to get on the run. … A sturdy veteran who knows what he’s doing, he saw it all playing for four years. He doesn’t need a lot of reps. … A perfect, versatile guard for a zone-blocking scheme. He can wall off his man from either side of the center.

Negatives: Not a killer. He’s more of a technician than a devastating run blocker. … Needs to find a nastier streak. He’ll do what he has to as a pro, but can he start beating people up? … Catches more than attacks. He needs to take the fight to his man.

Really, What’s He Going To Do In The NFL? He’ll be a proficient starter for the right offense.

12. Garrett Gilkey, Chadron State 6-6, 314 Proj. 5
Pre-Combine Analysis Positives: Great character. He’s self-motivated with the right attitude and the off-the-field make-up to make himself into a good pro. … Athletic for his size. Good enough on the move to get by. … Upside. The tools are there, but he’s just scratching the surface and can be a steal in the late rounds.

Negatives: Chadron State. Despite a nice week at the Senior Bowl, he still needs to prove he can hold up against the better athletes. He really didn’t face anyone who matches his skills. … Major red flag on medical history after having heart surgery in high school. … Just an okay athlete. He’s one of the few guards in this class who might not be quite right for a zone-blocking scheme.

Really, What’s He Going To Do In The NFL? A starting NFL guard after spending a few years as a swing backup.

13. Braden Hansen, BYU 6-5, 306 Proj. FREE AGENT
Pre-Combine Analysis Positives: Good size with a nice frame. Excellent in pass protection when he gets his hands on a defender. … Smart and mature. He doesn’t make a slew of big mistakes and has sound technique. … Experienced, he knows what he’s doing with plenty of starting time under his belt at both guard spots. He can play either side.

Negatives: This is it. There’s no upside. He has maxed out his frame and his potential. … Not an athlete. He has the body of a tackle but he’ll try to make himself into a guard. He might not have a long NFL life. … He’ll get eaten up by the quicker NFL linemen. If he doesn’t get his hands on a defender, there will be big problems.

Really, What’s He Going To Do In The NFL? A serviceable starter who’ll stick around for a few years because of his versatility.

14. Omoregie Uzzi, Georgia Tech 6-3, 300 Proj. 6
Pre-Combine Analysis Positives: Great for the Georgia Tech option attack, he was the top blocker on a line that put a premium on getting on the move. Great agility for a player of his size. … Quick off the ball and runs well. He’s an athlete who can be used to make the key downfield block. … Good enough in pass protection to get by. He won’t need much fine-tuning.

Negatives: Lacks the prototypical bulk. He can hit, but he’s going to be a finesse blocker at the next level. … Not a mauler. He’s about getting his man shoved out of the way, but he’s not going to kill anyone. … Only good for the right type of offense. Forget about him for a power running game.

Really, What’s He Going To Do In The NFL? He’ll start for years on the right team that needs quick interior linemen.

15. Jeff Baca, UCLA 6-3, 305Proj. 5
Pre-Combine Analysis Positives: A big-time run blocker who destroys his man to open up a hole. Never quits on a play. … Just athletic enough to be tried out at tackle at the next level. He might not look the part, but he saw time on the outside and held his own. … Moves well enough to be used in a variety of schemes. He should work for just about everyone.

Negatives: Lacks the raw tools. He’s just not big enough, and he can’t get bigger. He’s just not athletic enough to be a tackle. … Will try too hard at times. He can just make the routine block and doesn’t always have to punish. … He needs more time. He added some good weight, and while he might only have room for a few more good pounds, he needs to get stronger to handle himself in the pros.

Really, What’s He Going To Do In The NFL? He’ll turn into a decent mid-round pick as purely a run blocker.

16. Matt Gavin-Summers, California (OT) 6-4, 293 Proj. 6
Pre-Combine Analysis Positives: Part tackle, part guard, he showed his versatility and could end up hanging around the league for a while as a valuable swing blocker. He should be able to work without a problem inside or out in the right offense. … Fluid for an interior lineman. Moves without any wasted motion and has good technique. … Great on the move and great at sticking to his man. He doesn’t let go of a block.

Negatives: Not big enough. He’s not maxed out on his frame, but his game is about being quicker than everyone else and he might lose that with a few more pounds. … Goes for the kill shot a bit too much. He won’t be able to shove anyone around at the next level – he’ll have to be a wall-off blocker. … Not an elite athlete. He moves well, but he’s not an NFL tackle. He has to get stronger to handle life in the interior.

Really, What’s He Going To Do In The NFL? A nice mid-to-late round pickup who’ll turn into a decent starter.

17. Travis Bond, North Carolina (OT) 6-7, 330 Proj. FREE AGENT
Pre-Combine Analysis Positives: Built like a tackle, he could move outside to tackle, especially in jumbo packages. Really, REALLY big. … A enormous run blocker, he gets his guy on the move on sheer power. If he gets to a linebacker, forget it. … Great frame that’s impossible to get around. He has to be beaten off the ball or it isn’t happening.

Negatives: Too tall for a top guard. He plays too high and takes too long to get set. He can be beaten both by quicker defenders and powerful ones that get leverage right away. … A double cheeseburger away from blowing up. He had to work hard to get down from around 370. … Technique gets too sloppy, relying too much on his raw tools.

Really, What’s He Going To Do In The NFL? He’ll find a home as a serviceable NFL starter on his size alone.

18. Blaize Foltz, TCU 6-4, 310 Proj. FREE AGENT
Pre-Combine Analysis Positives: Nice size and frame with a little bit of room to get bigger. He could turn into a 325-pound mauler if given enough time. … Really, really strong. He beats up his man and then shoves him around some more. … Once he locks on, it’s over. See guy, hit guy. Great for the running game as one of the few power-punching run blockers in the draft.

Negatives: Not an athlete. He’ll get roasted by the quicker NFL interior linemen. … Knee issues. He rallied back to become a nice player, but there will always be concerns after suffering a torn ACL early in his career. … Might not have much upside as anything more than a pure run blocker. Forget about using him in a finesse attack.

Really, What’s He Going To Do In The NFL? It all depends on the team. If he’s on an offense that likes to play smashmouth, he’ll find a home.

19. Sam Brenner, Utah (OT) 6-4, 305 Proj. 6
Pre-Combine Analysis Positives: He has tackle size and the body, but he’ll use his tools at guard. Moves well in pass protection and could see time as a right tackle if absolutely needed. … Great on the move for running plays. Excellent at getting to the second level and burying the linebacker. … Good combination of strength and athleticism. He has the right ability and tools to be ready to go right away.

Negatives: Not quite bulky enough. He has the strength and the frame to add a bit more weight, but he’s not going to blast away on anyone. … Misses too many blocks. Doesn’t lock on well enough to hold and sustain. … Can’t play tackle at an NFL level. He has to be in a zone-blocking scheme at guard, and that could take some time and lots of weight room time.

Really, What’s He Going To Do In The NFL? A decent swing blocker who’ll sit on a roster because of his versatility.

20. Lane Taylor, Oklahoma State 6-3, 326 Proj. FREE AGENT
Pre-Combine Analysis Positives: Extremely experienced as the main blocker for some tremendous offensive machines. He has been through the wars. … Strong. Will punish a defender and will do whatever it takes to come up with the big, crushing block. … A great run blocker who’s built to work on the inside. He’s physical enough to be ready for the next level now.

Negatives: Not an athlete. Get him out of the phone booth and he’s in trouble. … Not great in pass protection for the next level. Adequate in college, he doesn’t have the foot speed to be able to handle the quicker defenders one-on-one. … Could use a little technique refinement. He’s not bad, but he needs to do everything right to be a solid pass protector.

Really, What’s He Going To Do In The NFL? A late-round steal who’ll grow into a decent starter for a power running team.

Free Agent Fliers

21. Eric Herman, Ohio 6-5, 321 Proj. 6
22. John Sullen, Auburn 6-5, 340 Proj. FREE AGENT
23. Chris Jacobson, Pitt 6-2, 311 Proj. FREE AGENT
24. Chris McDonald, Michigan State 6-5, 290 Proj. FREE AGENT
25. Ryan Seymour, Vanderbilt 6-4, 297 Proj. FREE AGENT

- 2013 CFN Pre-Combine OG Rankings, The Top Ten 
 
 

















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