2013 NFL Draft - Offensive Tackles No. 6-25

CollegeFootballNews.com
Posted Apr 12, 2013


From a college football perspective, the analysis of the top offensive tackle prospects.

2013 NFL Draft Position Rankings

OTs - No. 6 to 25


By Pete Fiutak
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- 2013 NFL Offensive Tackle Rankings - Top Five
 
6. Kyle Long, Oregon 6-6, 313
Is he a guard or a tackle? A former defensive end, he’s just starting to come into his own as a blocker. He’s a bit tall for a guard and isn’t really built for the interior, but he’s considered a possible option for the interior – he’s a tackle. With good feet and a nice frame, he has the look of an NFL tackle with a mean streak and the ability to finish the block and blast his man to spring the running game. He’ll need the right fit and he’ll need time to figure out exactly what his role is going to be, but he’ll be great for a zone-blocking scheme that allows him to get on the move a bit and he’ll be functional no matter where he ends up.
CFN Projection: Second Round

7. Oday Aboushi, Virginia 6-5, 308
A big blocker with good size, he’s a blaster if a run blocker who can be used almost anywhere on the line. While he’s destined to sit at right tackle, he can see time on the left side if needed or could even kick inside at guard in the right system. A great technician, he doesn’t make a slew of big mistakes and grew into the job on the left side over the course of his career, but he doesn’t have the quickness or athleticism to hold up against NFL speed rushers on a blindside. While he’ll hit, he’s not going to destroy his man – he’s more functional than a killer. Even so, he’s a fighter who’ll hold down a job for ten years.
CFN Projection: Third Round

8. David Bakhtiari, Colorado (Jr.) 6-4, 299
Some are going to try putting him at guard, but he has left tackle upside with excellent athleticism and the ability to get to the second level in a hurry. Still improving and emerging, he can be tried out in other areas until he’s ready to protect someone’s blindside. With the versatility to play just about anywhere up front, he’ll be seen as a good blocker who’ll be drafted to be a starter somewhere. However, he might not be elite in any one area. He’s not a special athlete, he’s not necessarily built like an NFL left tackle and he’s not a powerful blaster for the running game. Even so, there’s nice upside and he could end up being used as a swing blocker who can do a little of everything.
CFN Projection: Second Round

9. Justin Pugh, Syracuse (Jr.) 6-4, 307
Versatile enough to be a tackle or a guard, he can play anywhere on a line including left tackle. He’ll either be a powerful interior blocker or a quick right tackle, with good enough experience to handle himself well on the outside with excellent technique as a pass protector. He’ll never blast away on an NFL defense tackle, but he can wall him off and should be a functional starter. Needing to get stronger, he’s more of a zone-blocking prospect and doesn’t stand out as an elite prospect in any one area, but being a tweener, in his case, isn’t necessarily a bad thing.
CFN Projection: Second Round

10. Terron Armstrong, Arkansas Pine-Bluff 6-4, 308
With good feet to go along with his size, he’s a left tackle prospect with a world of big upside. He has the talent and could’ve played at a BCS school, but he needed time to grow into his job and could be just scratching the surface as a pass protector. An elite athlete for his size and bulk, he has the tools and abilities to play either tackle spot and is fine for every style. However, he needs a lot of work on his technique and needs seasoning. Even at Arkansas-Pine Bluff he struggled a bit against the better speed rushers and isn’t going to be ready out of the block, but there’s so much upside that he could end up being a top 60 pick on pure potential.
CFN Projection: Second Round

11. Ricky Wagner, Wisconsin (OG) 6-5, 308
A better-looking prospect going into last season, his stock fell as he struggled with the speedier defensive linemen, and he didn’t progress into a left tackle option as expected. However, he’s a brutish run blocker who can work as a right tackle or be moved to guard. While he made himself into a terrific prospect, he’s missing the quickness and the feet to handle pro speed rushers, working far better in a phone booth. For good and bad, there’s little room on his frame to get bigger – he’s in fantastic shape, but he’s maxed out at around 310 pounds. He’ll be a guard down the road, but he’ll be a good value in the middle rounds at right tackle.
CFN Projection: Fourth Round

12. Xavier Nixon, Florida 6-6, 321
The talent has always been there as a superstar prospect and recruit, but he never lived up to the promise. He wasn’t awful, but he was supposed to be a sure-thing All-America-caliber blocker, but he was mostly a turnstile against speed rushers and didn’t progress as expected. Even so, there’s a world of upside still there. He still needs to get involved with an NFL strength and conditioning coach and he still needs to transform his body, and when he does, and when he works on his technique and is able to stay low on a consistent basis, the sky’s the limit. There’s definite bust potential, but if he wants it, he could be a big-time pro.
CFN Projection: Third Round

13. Brennan Williams, North Carolina 6-5, 318
One of the better run blockers among the top tackle prospects, he’s a massive hitter who gets after his blocks and makes sure his man is shoved out of the way. There’s no problem with his want-to and his drive with a full-tilt motor and terrific attitude. While he can be worked out on either side, he’s a right tackle only without the quickness to become a full-time left tackle and doesn’t necessarily have the right demeanor to kill people as a guard. There’s a world of talent here, and he’ll be a favorite among the media as a long-time, solid-but-unspectacular pro.
CFN Projection: Third Round

14. Chris Faulk, LSU (Jr.) 6-4, 331
One of the tougher calls in the draft, he has prototype size and the right look of an NFL tackle, and while he might have the Right Tackle Only tag, he has the make-up to be a Pro Bowl talent in the spot. An absolute mauler, he crushes defenders once he’s able to lock on and gets leverage. The problem is his health, suffering knee injuries that kept him out last year and didn’t help his shape and body type – he needs lots and lots of time with an NFL conditioning coach. He could stand to get stronger and there are giant, glaring concerns, but he’s a late round chance worth taking.
CFN Projection: Fifth Round

15. Emmett Cleary, Boston College 6-7, 316
Really, really big, he has an NFL frame and the room to get even bigger. He’s not an athlete and he’s not a guard, so if he’s not a fit at right tackle he’s going to have a hard time finding a spot even though he played left tackle in college. He’s everything you’d want in a tackle in terms of coachability and drive with the right attitude and willingness to get better, but he’s just not quick enough and just doesn’t move well enough to succeed against the quicker pass rushers. He’ll fight to be a starter and he’ll find a way to get the job done, but there’s a hard ceiling on what he can do.
CFN Projection: Fourth Round

16. Braden Brown, BYU 6-5, 310
Mature, he’s married and a bit too old, but he moves extremely well and gets after defenders and makes sure they’re blocked. He busts his tail to do what he must and he works really, really hard to be prepared and do what he’s supposed to. While he has the right attitude and he’s what every coach wants in terms of personality, he doesn’t have NFL skills. Athletic, he moves well, but he doesn’t beat people up and he’s a limited all-around talent. He’ll be a backup somewhere on a line and could be a decent starter.
CFN Projection: Fifth Round

17. Nick Becton, Virginia Tech 6-5, 323
With excellent size and the right frame, he’s built to be an NFL tackle on either side. While he could carve out a career as a right tackle, he’ll get a long look on the left side with good athleticism to go along with his bulk. With a great attitude and the right personality, he has all the raw tools and abilities, but he needs lots and lots of seasoning. He’s a far, far better prospect than a football player, but there’s a world of upside if someone is patient.
CFN Projection: Fifth Round

18. Jamaal Johnson-Webb, Alabama A&M 6-5, 313
Athletic and big, he has the frame, the size, the experience and the tools to be molded into an NFL blocker. Now he needs to hit the weight room – hard – and he needs to change around his body type. He was able to get by on his raw tools at the lower level, but he has the right attitude to become an excellent part of an NFL line with time and seasoning.
CFN Projection: Fifth Round

19. Jordan Mills, Louisiana Tech 6-5, 316
Athletic and active, he moves extremely well for a player with a great frame, size and bulk. Now he has to learn how to be more of a blaster and use all his tools better. His technique and style combing from the Sonny Dykes offense has to be completely broken down and built back up again. He’s a pass blocker who receives and blocks instead of attacking and blasting, but he has the right mindset and the right ability to become a good pro in time. He could be a great value pick late.
CFN Projection: Fifth Round

20. Reid Fragel, Ohio State 6-8, 308
A former tight end, he’s really tall with a great frame, excellent athleticism and a world of upside with the ability and potential to become fantastic with a lot of time and work. A workout warrior, he killed it at the Combine with excellent work on the bench and terrific athleticism, but he needs to be a better football player. He needs to use his tools far better, getting by in college by being more athletic than everyone else and having the perfect attitude for a top-shelf Big Ten run blocker, but he needs a few years with a good line coach to get him to handle the subtleties of the position. There’s too much there not to be really, really interested after the second round, but he could be too much of a project.
CFN Projection: Fourth Round

21. Vinston Painter, Virginia Tech (OG) 6-4, 306
Extremely versatile and extremely athletic, his offseason workouts have been tremendous showing excellent feet and quickness while looking the part. In great shape, he doesn’t need any work in an NFL weight room, but on the downside, he might be maxed out on his frame – there isn’t much room to rock up another ten pounds to be a dominant guard. After starting out his career on the defensive line, he needs time and seasoning as an offensive lineman, and he’s not going to get it. There’s too much talent and upside to not get plenty of time in a camp, and there’s enough to get excited about to develop, but it’s going to take lots of patience.
CFN Projection: Fifth Round

22. Rogers Gaines, Tennessee State 6-6, 334
Big and with a great frame, even for an NFL tackle, he’s massive with phenomenal size and length. He’s a good worker who wants to do everything needed to become a good pro, but he’s an X factor because of the lower-level competition. He’s a project who needs to transform his body and become functionally stronger and in better shape after getting by on simply being far better than everyone at the lower level. There’s a lot to be excited about and plenty to work with, but it’s going to take time.
CFN Projection: Fifth Round

23. Luke Marquardt, Azusa Pacific 6-8, 315
Really tall, really big, and really imposing, he has special raw tools with excellent basketball-player athleticism to go along with the size. With the attitude and drive to be better, and extremely coachable, he’s a great prospect who coaches and personnel directors are going to love to bring into a camp, but is health is a major concern. Already banged up and hurt throughout his career, he’s a try-hard type who’ll do whatever is asked of him, but in the end will need lots of work and lots of crossed fingers that he can stay in one piece.
CFN Projection: Sixth Round

24. Tanner Hawkinson, Kansas 6-5, 298
Part guard, part tackle, he’s a bit too light and he doesn’t make up for it with any sort of power, but he’s been fantastic in offseason workouts running and moving well and looking like a potentially great part of a zone-blocking scheme as a guard or tackle. He’s not going to blow anyone away and he’ll get shoved around, but he’s a swing player who can work just about anywhere on a line and be an extremely valuable backup to keep around.
CFN Projection: Sixth Round

25. John Wetzel, Boston College 6-7, 315
Extremely big and very strong, he can see time at either tackle spot with the mauling ability to become a blaster of a run blocker. He doesn’t need a whole bunch of work and should be ready to go out of the box doing a nice job in pass protection and with the potential to work as a run blocking guard. There’s no finesse to his game and he’s missing the raw athleticism to handle NFL speed rushers, but he could be just versatile enough to find a roster spot.
CFN Projection: Sixth Round
 
- 2013 NFL Offensive Tackle Rankings - Top Five