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2013 NFL Draft - Wide Receivers No. 11-20

CollegeFootballNews.com
Posted Apr 15, 2013


From a college football perspective, the analysis of the top wide receiver prospects.

2013 NFL Draft Position Rankings

WRs - No. 11 to 20


By Pete Fiutak
Follow Us ... @ColFootballNews 
 
- 2013 Wide Receiver Rankings
- Receivers - No. 21-35
 
11. Markus Wheaton, Oregon State 5-11, 189
Smooth as silk, he plays fast as both a receiver and a kick returner, and he’s able to get in and out of his breaks in a step – he doesn’t need anything to get open. Fast, he can blow past the corner with one move, and while he’s not big, he’s just physical enough to not be shy about getting hit. While he’ll do whatever is needed, and he’s a willing blocker, he’s not very good at it. Coaches love him and will find a way to carve out roles for him, and self-motivation will never be an issue. It would be nice if he could get up to around 200 pounds, but his other overall skills make up for his lack of bulk.
CFN Projection: Third Round

12. Cobi Hamilton, Arkansas 6-2, 212
While he’s not quite big enough to be a dominant physical force, he’s bulky. While he’s not quite fast enough to be a dangerous deep ball threat, he can make things happen on the fly and plays faster than he times. While he needs to keep hitting the weights to get stronger, and he’s not an elite athlete, he turned into a good football player as he stepped up his game in a miserable year for the Hogs. There are too many negatives to ever become an elite receiver, but he can get behind a D and can turn into more of a possession target as he gets more comfortable.
CFN Projection: Third Round

13. Aaron Dobson, Marshall 6-3, 210
Great size with the NFL look, he’s built like a next-level receiver with just enough functional speed to work on the outside, but with the body and the hands to make things happen in traffic and fight for the ball. While he has smallish hands, he grabs everything remotely in his range with the ability to make the spectacular look routine. With good toughness and blocking ability, he can do it all. He’s missing the deep wheels to take the top off a defense, and the production was merely average last year with 57 catches and just three scores in a top passing offense, but he has the want-to and skills to become a good, sound starter.
CFN Projection: Third Round

14. Denard Robinson, Michigan 5-10, 199
Make no mistakes about it; he’s a project. A quarterback trying to become an NFL receiver, he has great speed and peerless quickness with electrifying moves in the open field as a runner and potentially a returner, but it’s going to take a little while to get the subtle nuances down. Get the ball in his hands on the move and magical things will happen – until he gets hit. He can’t seem to get popped without getting hurt, and he’s a bit of a square peg in a round hole with the position change. A good guy and a leader, he’ll make himself into a good player with a little bit of time and seasoning. No, he’s not a passing quarterback, but he can be used under center in special packages designed for him.
CFN Projection: Fourth Round

15. Marquise Goodwin, Texas 5-9, 183
Fast, fast, fast, fast, FAST, he doesn’t have NFL receivers skills and he’ll get blown over and shoved around by a light breeze, but the speed is uncoachable. With world-class, 4.2ish wheels, he can be devastating as a kickoff returner and can be tested out in a variety of ways to get the ball in his hands. Yes, it’s over when a defender locks on, but if he gets a step, he’s gone. The athleticism and speed are too much and too exciting to not want to play around with, and he’ll do whatever a coach wants, but he needs to work on becoming a more polished, well-rounded receiver. NFL offensive coordinators will take all the bad with his phenomenal speed.
CFN Projection: Third Round

16. Josh Boyce, TCU (Jr.) 5-11, 206
Strong and physical, he’s has a good, tough body and isn’t afraid to use it. He benched 22 times at the Combine and looked the part with smooth quickness through the short drills to go along with a blazing sub-4.4 40. While he has the speed and cutting ability, he’s not an elite athlete. When he has to make the tough grab, his hands are fantastic, but he’ll fight the ball a bit much and he doesn’t block as consistently as he should. He’s not going to get any bigger and he might not have a world of upside, but with his raw speed, versatility and bulk there’s plenty to work with.
CFN Projection: Fourth Round

17. Chris Harper, Kansas State 6-1, 229
The former Oregon quarterback is still just scratching the surface. He thinks and plays like a former signal caller, but he’s tight end strong and built like a fullback. An Anquan Bolden type, he’s fast enough to get by and is extremely tough with a great build and nice blocking skills. There’s a world of upside with the ability and potential to blow up once he’s in a real passing attack. He’s going to be 24 this year and he might not grow into his talent and skills for a few years, but he’s a different type of receiver with too many good qualities to worry about the lack of raw speed and quickness.
CFN Projection: Third Round

18. Tavarres King, Georgia
While he doesn’t have elite wheels, he’s fast enough to be an NFL deep threat with the moves and athleticism to do a little bit of anything. The hands are average and he tends to fight the ball a bit too much, but he’s a good overall pass catcher who’s able to track the ball well down the field. While he’s good out of the box as a ready-made deep threat, he has plenty of upside. Once he gets in better shape, transforms his body a bit and rocks up with an NFL strength coach, he could be more than just a fly pattern target and could work far better in the interior. He could turn into an ideal No. 3 target in time.
CFN Projection: Fourth Round

19. Ace Sanders, South Carolina (Jr.) 5-7, 173
He’s way too small, way too slow and doesn’t have any functional strength, but he’s a terrific football player who cuts on a dime and makes things happen every time he touches the ball. An elite punt returner, he could be a specialist and a No. 3 receiver who rips up linebackers and destroys people in space. The lack of deep speed is a problem, and he’s not built to take many hits, but he’s such a playmaker that some offensive coordinator is going to want to come up with several interesting packages to suit his talents. He’d be a fun toy to play with.
CFN Projection: Fourth Round

20. Ryan Swope, Texas A&M 6-0, 205
He’s going to be lumped in by the lazier scouts as a Wes Welker-Danny Amendola type because he’s smallish, played for a Texas school and white, but unlike the former Texas Tech playmakers he’s a phenomenal raw athlete with sub-4.4 speed and tremendous quickness and leaping ability. While he’s not all that physical and can be knocked off his routes way too easily, he’s always finding way to get open and he’s not afraid to take a pop – to a fault. Concussions have been a problem and he takes way too many big shots with the potential to have big issues if he gets blown up a few times.
CFN Projection: Fourth Round

- 2013 Wide Receiver Rankings
- Receivers - No. 21-35