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2013 NFL Draft - Top Big East Prospects

CollegeFootballNews.com
Posted Apr 16, 2013


2013 NFL Draft - Top Big East Prospects. Who are the best and brightest NFL prospects from each league?

2013 NFL Draft 

Top 5 Big East Players


By Pete Fiutak
Follow Us ... @ColFootballNews 

2013 NFL Draft Analysis
- Quarterbacks | Running Backs | Wide Receivers
- Offensive Tackles | Offensive Guards | Centers 

Top 5 Conference Prospects
- ACC | Big East | Big Ten | Big 12 | M-West | Pac-12 | SEC 

1. S Logan Ryan, Rutgers 5-11, 191
A good-sized, strong defender, he has the right frame and the right look for a starting NFL quarterback. It would be nice if he was a half-tick faster, but he plays quick and he makes up for several concerns with tremendous tackling ability. Physical, he’s a stats guy who brings is against the run, but he also moves nicely and can stay with the quicker receivers. A better football player than a workout warrior, he’s missing all the next-level tools missing the raw speed and without special skills. You don’t want a secondary full of Ryans, but he’ll be very consistent and very tough as a nice playmaker who’ll be a nice starter for a long time.
CFN Projection: Second Round

2. QB Ryan Nassib, Syracuse 6-2, 227
One of the highest risers over the last six months, he’s impressing more and more with each workout and each interview. He’s not all that tall and he’s a bit squatty and stocky for the position, but he’s a tough, sound pro who’s ready-made to step off the bus and be in contention for a starting job. Polished, he worked with a pro coach in Doug Marrone who helped tutor and mold him into a polished passer, and now he doesn’t need too much technique work. There’s a hard ceiling on what he can do with an average arm and not enough of a repertoire of pitches – he tends to have one speed – but he’s a baller who’ll do whatever is needed. However, he’ll be good, but he’ll also be overrated and overdrafted as more of a try-hard type than a top talent.
CFN Projection: Second Round

3. OT Justin Pugh, Syracuse (Jr.) 6-4, 307
Versatile enough to be a tackle or a guard, he can play anywhere on a line including left tackle. He’ll either be a powerful interior blocker or a quick right tackle, with good enough experience to handle himself well on the outside with excellent technique as a pass protector. He’ll never blast away on an NFL defense tackle, but he can wall him off and should be a functional starter. Needing to get stronger, he’s more of a zone-blocking prospect and doesn’t stand out as an elite prospect in any one area, but being a tweener, in his case, isn’t necessarily a bad thing.
CFN Projection: Second Round

4. CB Blidi Wreh-Wilson, Connecticut 6-1, 195
With great length and nice size, he has the potential to grow into a whale of a nickel and dime defender or be moved over to free safety, but he’s a corner with good quickness and tremendous athleticism. He can jump out of the stadium, using his skills well to make up for his lack of raw speed. While he’s experienced and tough, he’s not a great tackler and can be shoved around a bit too much. He’ll hit, but he’s not going to blast away on anyone and will need help in run support. Able to find ways to make plays, he has good instincts and leadership skills to shine somewhere in a secondary.
CFN Projection: Second Round

5. LB Sio Moore, Connecticut 6-1, 245
A terrific tackler, he packs a pop with excellent hitting ability and toughness. A pure linebacker, he’s always around the ball and he’s always finding ways to come up with the play. Smart, he seems to be one step ahead of the play and he always knows how to get around the ball. He’ll fight to make a play. He showed off surprising athleticism at the Combine and now might not be just an inside linebacker like he projected to be throughout his college career. The pass rushing skills are there and he’s a disruptive force who finds ways to make things happen. Likely a good value pick, he has the make-up and the attitude to be a statistical superstar, but he’ll drop to the mid rounds because he might not have a set position. He’ll be underdrafted and will pay off big.
CFN Projection: Third Round