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2013 NFL Draft - Houston Texans

CollegeFootballNews.com
Posted Apr 28, 2013


Houston Texans - AFC South, 2013 Draft Selections & Prospects

Houston Texans

2013 NFL Draft Team Analysis - AFC
EAST Buffalo | Miami | New England | NY Jets
WEST Denver | Kansas City |  Oakland | San Diego
NORTH Baltimore | Cincinnati  Cleveland | Pittsburgh
SOUTH Houston | Indy | Jacksonville | Tennessee

2013 NFL Draft Team Analysis - NFC
EAST Dallas | NY Giants | Philadelphia | Washington
WEST Arizona | San Francisco | Seattle | St. Louis
NORTH Chicago | Detroit | Green Bay | Minnesota
SOUTH Atlanta | Carolina | New Orleans | Tampa Bay    
 
- 2012 Houston Draft Breakdown
- 2011 Houston Draft Breakdown
- 2010 Houston Draft Breakdown  

FIRST ROUND

WR DeAndre Hopkins, Clemson
(Jr.) 6-1, 214
Overall Pick No. 27 CFN Position Rank: 2

CFN Analysis: Forget about the hotel stuff at the Combine – he’s fine. The Texans desperately needed a gamebreaking playmaker to step in for an injured DeVier Posey and to help out Andre Johnson, and he could rise up and be the heir apparent to No. 80 with a little bit of time. He knows how to handle himself in single coverage, and he’ll see plenty of it early on.

Everyone came to see Sammy Watkins in 2012, but it was Hopkins who stole the show, highlighted by a scintillating performance in the win over LSU in the Chick-fil-A Bowl catching 13 passes for 191 yards and two touchdowns. The 4.5 speed is fine, but nothing special, but he’s a strong route runner and is tough as nails when he has to go across the middle. As good as he was, there’s still plenty of upside and potential as he’s just scratching the surface. Coaches will love him because he can block, and quarterbacks will adore him because he’ll catch anything thrown his way. He looks and plays like a No. 1 receiver, but he’s not and he needs a good, dangerous receiver on the other side to help take the attention away. He’ll do all the grunt work needed to make a play.
CFN Projection: Second Round

SECOND ROUND

FS D.J. Swearinger, South Carolina 5-11, 208
Overall Pick No. 57 CFN Position Rank: 5
Very smart, very sound and very savvy, he battled through the SEC wars and was a standout on a team full of standout defenders. A huge hitter, he packs a wallop who seems to love getting physical and blasting away to make a point. Not just tough, he’s quick both on the field and in workouts, and he makes up for his lack of bulk with outstanding athleticism. Size will be a factor as he’s too small and not thick enough, and with no room to get any bigger. He can’t freelance a the next level and he needs to be able to keep his emotions and fire in check, but he’ll be productive starter who’ll rile everyone up – including the opponent – with way too much chatter. He knows what he can do, and he wants everyone else to know, too.
CFN Projection: Second Round

THIRD ROUND

OT Brennan Williams, North Carolina 6-5, 318
Overall Pick No. 89 CFN Position Rank: 13
One of the better run blockers among the top tackle prospects, he’s a massive hitter who gets after his blocks and makes sure his man is shoved out of the way. There’s no problem with his want-to and his drive with a full-tilt motor and terrific attitude. While he can be worked out on either side, he’s a right tackle only without the quickness to become a full-time left tackle and doesn’t necessarily have the right demeanor to kill people as a guard. There’s a world of talent here, and he’ll be a favorite among the media as a long-time, solid-but-unspectacular pro.
CFN Projection: Third Round

DE Sam Montgomery, LSU (Jr.) 6-3, 262
Overall Pick No. 95 CFN Position Rank: 7
A better football player than a tester, he doesn’t move quite as well as you might like and doesn’t explode off the ball as a pure pass rusher, but he makes things happen. He’s a fighter who’ll beat up his man and held up well against the best of the best SEC blockers showing decent power against the run and a good motor. While there might be some concerns after a rocky time at the Combine, and he might need a coaching staff to keep on him and keep pushing him to improve, he’s one of the most complete ends in the draft. He might not do any one thing extremely well, and he might not have Pro Bowl tools with little upside, but he’ll be a longtime starter who’ll be far steadier than spectacular.
CFN Projection: Third Round

FOURTH ROUND

OLB Trevardo Williams, Connecticut 6-1, 241
Overall Pick No. 124 CFN Position Rank: 14
A pure pass rusher with terrific straight line speed, he has worked on the end and could be a tweener who projects as an outside linebacker for any system. A phenomenal closer, when he gets a bead on a quarterback or a ball-carrier, it’s over with a great final burst. Really, really cut, he doesn’t have any room to get any bigger, and that’s a problem. He gets blocked way too easily and will be erased by any NFL blocker who’s able to lock on. It’s going to be a little while to put it all together with no real moves, but that can be easily fixed. He’ll be a specialist right away and nothing more than a third down pass rusher, but he could be really, really good at that one thing.
CFN Projection: Fourth Round  

SIXTH ROUND

WR Alan Bonner, Jacksonville State 5-10, 193
Overall Pick No. 195 CFN Position Rank: Not Ranked

DT Chris Jones, Bowling Green 6-2, 302
Overall Pick No. 198 CFN Position Rank: 21
Supremely productive with elite weight room strength, he was a terror in MAC backfields as a pass rusher and playmaker behind the line. The Bowling Green defense was the best in the league, and it all started with him making everything happen up front. While he’s not an elite athlete, he’s quick off the ball and ragdolls his man out of the way to make a play. However, his workout strength doesn’t match up to his on-field play, getting erased by bigger, bulkier blockers who beat him to the punch. He’ll always bring an honest day’s work and he’ll be the type of backup coaches love to throw into the mix to keep the energy going, but he doesn’t have NFL skills to be a regular starter.
CFN Projection: Fifth Round

TE Ryan Griffin, Connecticut 6-5, 247
Overall Pick No. 201 CFN Position Rank: Not Ranked

OG David Quessenberry, San Jose State 6-5, 302
Overall Pick No. 176 CFN Position Rank: 7
Is he a tackle or a guard? A true tweener, he’s terrific in pass protection with the potential to move outside and work on the left size if he’s able to bulk up and add more functional strength. Smooth as glass, the former left tackle moves extremely well with great quickness, excellent feet and the want-to to keep fighting to make a block. A talented football player, he might not have all the right tools, but he could have a long and productive career in a zone-blocking scheme in any role. He’s going to do everything a coaching staff wants and he’s going to be versatile enough to find a starting spot somewhere, but he isn’t for every scheme and needs to get bigger and stronger to be a star.
CFN Projection: Third Round