2013 NFL Draft - 20 Best Undrafted Players
Oklahoma S Tony Jefferson
Oklahoma S Tony Jefferson
CollegeFootballNews.com
Posted Apr 29, 2013


Who are the best players who weren't taken in the 2013 NFL Draft?



2013 NFL Draft

Best Undrafted Players


2013 NFL Draft Team Analysis - AFC
EAST Buffalo | Miami | New England | NY Jets
WEST Denver | Kansas City |  Oakland | San Diego
NORTH Baltimore | Cincinnati  Cleveland | Pittsburgh
SOUTH Houston | Indy | Jacksonville | Tennessee

2013 NFL Draft Team Analysis - NFC
EAST Dallas | NY Giants | Philadelphia | Washington
WEST Arizona | San Francisco | Seattle | St. Louis
NORTH Chicago | Detroit | Green Bay | Minnesota
SOUTH Atlanta | Carolina | New Orleans | Tampa Bay    

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1. ILB Kevin Reddick, North Carolina 6-1, 243 
SIGNED WITH NEW ORLEANS
Very good as is, there’s still a world of upside with excellent talent, good size and a nice résumé. Productive, he was able to get into the backfield and also showed he could hold up well on a regular basis against the run. With a fire for the game, he’s a leader who won’t need any motivation and should be able to take a defense and make it his. There’s another level he can go with his game, needing to be a more consistent tackler and needing to keep working in the film room to improve his instincts and feel, and he should get there with the right coaching. A blaster with good quickness, he has just enough athleticism to move where needed and not need everything funneled his way. He’ll make a ton of tackles and should put up big stats.
CFN Projection: Second Round

2. SS Tony Jefferson, Oklahoma (Jr.) 5-11, 213 
SIGNED WITH ARIZONA
One of the best run stopping safeties in the draft, he’s like another linebacker working in the secondary. Tough, he isn’t afraid to come up with the big hit and seems to relish the responsibility of needing to come through. Ultra-aggressive and self-motivated, he’ll be a coaches’ favorite and will be a natural leader. The raw speed isn’t there and he was shocking weak in the weight room considering his style of play and his production, and he’ll have to get functionally stronger. Mediocre when the ball is in the air, he’s going to need to be surrounded by speedier players. He’s not for every system, but on the right team he’ll be one of the leading tacklers.
CFN Projection: Fourth Round

3. WR Da’Rick Rogers, Tennessee Tech (Jr.) 6-3, 217 
SIGNED WITH BUFFALO
With excellent size, 4.5 speed and great strength, the ability is undeniable. Athletic and quick for his size, he moves without effort and is dangerous when he gets on the move. When he wants a ball, he’ll beat up his man to go grab the ball and make the play. Fluid, there’s almost no effort to get in and out of his breaks and there’s jaw-dropping leaping ability when the ball is in the air. Now he has to harness the talent to become a top football player. He doesn’t have Randy Moss-like otherworldly skills to overlook his off-the-field knucklehead streak, and he’s not a true blazer, but there’s enough talent and upside to get a top 50 talent in the middle rounds.
CFN Projection: Fourth Round

4. OG Alvin Bailey, Arkansas (Jr.) 6-3, 312
SIGNED WITH SEATTLE
Extremely strong and shockingly fast, he’s an elite athlete for a 300+ pounder and he’s ready for the NFL right now. Productive and effective at a high SEC level for a long time, he has been through the wars and knows how to handle himself against the power defenders, the quick ones, and everyone in between. Versatile, he can play either guard spot and succeed with proven ability to hold up well in pass protection. It’s going to take a little technique work to lock on to his man better, and he has to be able to handle the more creative interior pass rushers, and his technique work has to be stronger to be as good as he can be for the running game – he has problems when he doesn’t do everything right – but if he can get maintain his current weight and doesn’t get complacent, he could grow into a terrific starter.
CFN Projection: Third Round

5. P Brad Wing, LSU 6-3, 205
A game-changer, the left-footer is a big, strong punter who can bail a team out of any jam by cranking out a huge kick. Mechanically sound, he’s ready from Day One to step on an NFL field and kick, needing little work or tweaking. He can do it all, able to hang it up in the air for a mile, or can put it inside the 20 when he’s focused. And that’s a little bit of the problem. He was suspended for the Chick-fil-A Bowl after failing a drug test, and he’s a character who might step out a big considering he’s a punter, but he has a pro leg and will be in the league longer than any of the LSU pro prospects in this draft.
CFN Projection: Fourth Round

6. QB Tyler Bray, Tennessee (Jr.) 6-6, 232
SIGNED WITH KANSAS CITY
If you’re looking for the guy in the draft who does one thing at a Super Bowl-winning level, it’s Bray and his arm. Very tall with the ability to play big, he has the height, but more than anything else he has a major league arm with the ability to make all the throws. The potential is there to be a nice backup for a while before getting his shot at a starting job, and by then he should be fully polished. However, at the moment, he needs to be able to do all the little things right. He relies on his arm way too much and tends to get a little bit lazy at times, knowing he can usually gun his way out of tough situations. More than anything else, he needs to act the part. Not necessarily fiery and with a bit of a knucklehead streak, he has to show that he wants to be something special and wants to hone his craft. If he wants it, he has the potential to be a strong starter who can carve out a long career if the light goes on.
CFN Projection: Third Round

7. RB Cierre Wood, Notre Dame (Jr.) 5-11, 213 
SIGNED WITH HOUSTON
The basics are in place with good bulk, a great frame and excellent straight line speed. A fantastic athlete, he moves like a much smaller back and can find a hole and blast through it. However, he doesn’t bring the power for a player of his size and doesn’t use his physical skills on a consistent enough basis. There’s good upside and potential, and it’s possible he could be just scratching the surface with the talent to potentially be an Arian Foster-like surprise in the right system, but he has to want it. He has to make the most of his chances, and a coaching staff looking for a back with terrific cutback ability could make him a key part of an attack right away.
CFN Projection: Fourth Round

8. OT Xavier Nixon, Florida 6-6, 321
SIGNED WITH WASHINGTON
The talent has always been there as a superstar prospect and recruit, but he never lived up to the promise. He wasn’t awful, but he was supposed to be a sure-thing All-America-caliber blocker, but he was mostly a turnstile against speed rushers and didn’t progress as expected. Even so, there’s a world of upside still there. He still needs to get involved with an NFL strength and conditioning coach and he still needs to transform his body, and when he does, and when he works on his technique and is able to stay low on a consistent basis, the sky’s the limit. There’s definite bust potential, but if he wants it, he could be a big-time pro.
CFN Projection: Third Round

9. CB Nickell Robey, USC (Jr.) 5-7, 169
SIGNED WITH BUFFALO
Speedy, feisty and quick, he moves at an elite level with the leaping ability to play bigger on jump balls and against the taller targets. While he’s not a blazer, he has good enough speed to get by, but his real strength is his quickness. Smooth as silk, he can gets around easily and mirror without a problem. No, he’s not going to shed any blockers and he’ll get pushed around, but he’s a good tackler for his size and managed to always get the job done both against the pass and the run. He’ll gamble a bit and will take a few unnecessary chances, but he’s a functional No. 2 starting corner who’ll be up to the challenge when picked on.
CFN Projection: Fourth Round

10. OG Stephan Milhim, Massachusetts 6-4, 314
With perfect size and length, he looks the part of a right tackle or a good guard. All the tools are in place with decent athleticism and the fight and want-to to be better; he’ll work and work hard to find a way to make a roster. Now he needs to become a better football player and has to use all his skills and all his potential to get the technique right, blast away a little more and start attacking rather than walling. It might take a little while to put it all together, but he has the upside to become a solid talent.
CFN Projection: Fifth Round

11. FS Robert Lester, Alabama 6-1, 220
SIGNED WITH CAROLINA
A high-character player who’ll do whatever he must to make a roster and an impact, he’s a dangerous playmaker when the ball is in the air who could shine as a nickel or dime defender. A pick-off artist, he’s also excellent at stepping up against the run and is always willing to do the dirty work. He’s too slow and isn’t enough of an athlete, and he’s too inconsistent with mediocre range, but he’s a decent backup option who can work in a variety of roles.
CFN Projection: Sixth Round

12. DT Kwame Geathers, Georgia (Jr.) 6-5, 342
SIGNED WITH SAN DIEGO
Really, REALLY big, he’s a massive human being who can sit in the middle of a line and gum everything up. He takes up a ton of space and makes himself bigger with a long frame and decent enough lateral quickness to slide over and make a stop. Keeping his weight in check is going to be a huge problem with the potential crank up another 20 pounds of bad blubber if he relaxed for ten minutes, but more than anything else he has to work on doing everything right every play. He gets shoved around way too much for a player of his size and has never had to be conditioned enough to be a full-time interior defender. He’ll never get to the quarterback and he might only be good for about 20 plays a game, but players of his size and ability are rare.
CFN Projection: Fourth Round

13. ILB Jonathan Stewart, Texas A&M 6-4, 242
SIGNED WITH ST. LOUIS
While others on the A&M defense got the hype and the limelight. Stewart did his job making plenty of tackles over the last few years as a sound and solid tackler. Fast and athletic, he can play any spot in the linebacking corps and could be moved outside without a problem. While he didn’t test well in offseason workouts, he plays fast and moves quickly when he needs to. With his size and skills he can be a functional all-around playmaker no matter where he works, and while he’s not really built for the middle - he doesn’t have middle linebacker instincts and wastes too many steps - he could put up big numbers as a 3-4 inside defender.
CFN Projection: Fourth Round

14. CB Johnny Adams, Michigan State 5-10, 185
SIGNED WITH HOUSTON
While he’s not huge, he has excellent speed and good physical skills. He plays tougher than his size against the run and won’t back down from contact. With a good attitude, he has no problems taking on the opposing No. 1 receiver and welcomes the big challenge. Too thin and with little heft, he’ll get shoved around a bit much and won’t be able to handle the more physical targets, and after an inconsistent season, his stock has dropped a bit – he was a much better prospect going into 2012. He’ll make a roster as a dime defender and he’ll hang around the league for a while seeing time as a second corner.
CFN Projection: Fifth Round

15. DT Cory Grissom, USF 6-1, 306
SIGNED WITH NEW ENGLAND
There isn’t any flash to his game whatsoever as a pure run stopper on the nose, and he’s never going to come up with any big stats, but he’s a brick wall against the run with the athleticism to move around and come up with big stops here and there. He’ll step up and take on two blockers without an issue, and he has the right frame and body to occupy the interior, but he has to get and stay healthy. Banged up throughout his career, he was never really right on a regular basis and he’ll never get through a full season healthy. Not a pass rusher and without any creativity to get behind the line, he’s a pure run stopper who might not be dependable enough considering his past medical issues. However, he could be a nice part of a rotation as long as he’s not asked to carry a line.
CFN Projection: Fourth Round

16. OLB Chase Thomas, Stanford 6-3, 244
SIGNED WITH NEW ORLEANS
Really smart and a tremendous leader, he’s a tough guy who takes over a defense and makes it his. Stanford has had some terrific talents over the last few years, but this was Chase Thomas’s defense. With perfect instincts, he makes up for a ton of glaring issues with great timing and by being two steps ahead of everyone else. Not an NFL athlete, he’s slow, doesn’t have great quickness as a pass rusher and should have problems when the game is a half-click faster than it was in college. It would be nice if he could play inside, but that’s not really his game – he’s not quite bulk enough or strong enough for the position. He’ll never be a sure-thing star, but he’ll make plenty of plays and will be a good producer as long as he’s surrounded by talent.
CFN Projection: Fourth Round

17. OLB Lerentee McCray, Florida 6-2, 250
SIGNED WITH DENVER
It took a little while before he became a player, and now there’s lots of tread left on the tires with a world of great upside. With decent size and excellent quickness, he has good tools to go along with a great motor going 100 miles per hour all the time. He makes up for problems with great tools and want-to – he never stops working and fights his way into making plays. While he’ll overrun plays because he’s trying too hard, it’s coachable to dial things back a bit. Health is always a problem, dinged up throughout his career, and he worked behind an elite defensive front, but he could be an intriguing part of a defense as an X factor.
CFN Projection: Fourth Round

18. OLB Mike Taylor, Wisconsin 6-1, 234
Too small, too slow and with no room to get bigger and no real chance to get faster, he’s missing all the basics. However, he’s a devastating football player and a peerless tackler, using his smarts and instincts to be one step ahead of the play and doing everything needed to come up with a stop. He’ll never get in the backfield and he’ll never be flashy, but he’ll go unnoticed for long stretches but will still end up with 12 tackles. He’ll have to be a key special teamer, but he can work in a variety of ways in a rotation and produce when he gets his chances.
CFN Projection: Sixth Round

19. ILB John Lotulelei, UNLV 5-11, 233
SIGNED WITH SEATTLE
He’s not big and he’s not fast, but he manages to beat people up and use his strength and power to play far bigger. Really quick in the short drills, he moves well in space and does a nice job of lining up on a ball carrier to make a play. A tough guy who makes himself a leader by his play and his attitude, he’s always working and always fighting. He’ll be erased by the bigger blockers and he needs to hit the weight room to rock up a bit, but he’s a good football player who can battle his way into a lineup.
CFN Projection: Sixth Round

20. TE Ryan Otten, San Jose State 6-5, 230 
SIGNED WITH JACKSONVILLE
A tough all-around player who makes things happen when he gets the ball in his hands, he’s a No. 1 target who took on the role of being the main man for a strong passing game. With a nice pass catching radius, throw it anywhere near it and he’ll go after it, attacking the ball with everything sticking to his hands. Extremely coachable, he’ll do whatever is asked of him and will do all the little things right. The raw athleticism is missing and he’s not going to blast anyone as a blocker, but he’s a good hustler who’ll work himself into a job. At the very least, he can grow into a nice short-to-midrange go-to target on third downs.
CFN Projection: Fourth Round