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2009 NFL Draft Analysis - Round Two
Miami Dolphin QB/WR Pat White
Miami Dolphin QB/WR Pat White
CollegeFootballNews.com
Posted Apr 25, 2009


Who went where and how good are each of the draft picks in the 2nd round?



2009 NFL Draft - Second Round

- 2009 NFL Draft Breakdown and Analysis
1st Round
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CFN 2009 Draft Central & Team-by-Team Picks and Analysis
  ROUND 2
# Pick Team
1 33 Detroit  Louis Delmas, FS Western Michigan 5-11, 202
For good and bad, he’s a major-league hitter, often going for the kill shot and missing when he should simply be wrapping up. However, he’s an intimidating force who’ll spend plenty of time featured on the Jacked Up highlight reel. He’ll do whatever is needed against the run, but he has to get stronger after only coming up with 12 reps on the bench at the Combine. Given time, he could be the leader and the sheriff of the secondary, and he should be a fan favorite as long as he can stay on the field. With the way he plays, he might have a short shelf life.
CFN Projection: Second Round
   CFN Position Rank: 3
2 34 New England (from Kansas City)   Patrick Chung, SS Oregon 5-11, 212
He’s not going to be a highlight reel playmaker, but he’ll be a rock-solid, ultra-reliable rock in the secondary for a long, long time. Smart, tough, and instinctive, he’s able to read plays a half second before they happen and he’s always around the ball. While he’s built for stopping the run and being used as a strong safety, he has just enough range to play free safety. Known for being a good, sound football player, he showed he could be a workout warrior, too, by running a 4.49 and lifting 225 pounds a lineman-like 25 times at the Combine. There’s no down side outside of his lack of pizzazz.
CFN Projection: Second Round    CFN Position Rank: 1
3 35 St. Louis  James Laurinaitis, LB Ohio State  6-2, 245
Stunningly mediocre at the Combine, when he was expected to blow the quickness, speed, and agility drills off the charts, his stock has dropped to a low point considering he likely would’ve been taken in the top ten had he left a year early. After a breakthrough sophomore season when he seemingly made every play possible against the run and the pass, he got by more on reputation, at least when it came to the award-types, than big-time production. While he filled the stat sheet, he wasn’t quite the difference maker the numbers indicated. Strong when he was in space and able to roam to the ball, he had problems when attacked and blocked. Even so, he was the leader of a fantastic defense, especially against the run, and has absolutely no bust potential, unless he gets hurt. He’ll make a ton of tackles and will be a fan favorite, but he’s not going to be a special all-around star.
CFN Projection: First Round
   CFN Position Rank: 2
4 36 Cleveland   Brian Robiskie, WR Ohio State 6-3, 209
While he’s not all that fast and he’s not quite good enough to be an elite go-to target, he’s ready to step in and be a starter right now. He’s polished, productive, and smart. He’ll get the pro playbook right away, will be a favorite for any quarterback because of his route running ability, and he’ll make the plays thrown his way. What he doesn’t have is the top-end gear to get past an NFL corner, but he should grow into a terrific No. 2 target who thrives alongside a speedy No. 1. While there might be a bit of a ceiling on what he can become, he was underutilized in his final year once Terrelle Pryor took over. While he might have disappeared at times, that’s not going to happen once he sets foot in a pro-style offense.
CFN Projection: Second Round
   CFN Position Rank: 5
5 37 Denver (from Seattle)   Alphonso Smith, CB Wake Forest  5-9, 195
The ACC’s all-time leader in interceptions, he has a knack for being around the ball and he doesn’t miss when he gets his chance to make a big play. He’s not strong and he’s not all that physical, but he tends to hold his own against the bigger receivers and he has no problems keeping with the quicker ones. Very smart, he’ll have to overcome his lack of elite athleticism by outworking everyone in the film room and taking a few educated gambles here and there. He’ll start out in nickel and dime packages and could be a team-leader in interceptions.
CFN Projection:
Second Round
   CFN Position Rank: 3
6 38 Cincinnati  Rey Maualuga, LB USC  6-2, 249
A Yeah, But player. Yeah, he’s not fast, but he always seems to be around the ball. Yeah, he’s a bit smaller than originally thought, but his peerless hitting ability and toughness more than makes up for it. Yeah, he doesn’t have the best range, instincts, or quickness in pass coverage, but the guy is a flat-out football player. Yeah, he had a rocky career at times at USC when it came to off-the-field issues (many stemming from the loss of his father), but he was the unquestioned leader of a phenomenal defense. A big-time playmaker for the inside, and the inside only, he’ll run through a wall to succeed and become an NFL star. While he was a bit overrated because his highlight reel hits overshadowed times when he was merely average, and he had a phenomenal supporting cast around him, he should be able to step in and start right away as long as he’s next to some athletic, playmaking running mates.
CFN Projection: First Round
   CFN Position Rank: 1
7 39 Jacksonville  Eben Britton, OT Arizona  6-6, 310 (Jr.)
It all depends on what you want out of him. If you’re looking for a left tackle to protect a quarterback’s blind side, there are going to be problems. He was fine in college, but he’s not athletic enough to be a consistent pass blocker against the faster pass rushers. In the pros, he’ll be tried out at left tackle, but he’ll have a long, solid career on the right side. Being labeled as a right-side-only tackle is the kiss of death, but it might not be a bad thing here. Britton is a very smart, very tough blocker who doesn’t make mistakes; his problems will come from simply not being an elite enough athlete. In a perfect world, there’s no reason to mess with it. Put him on the right side and sleep well for the next decade. When needed, put him on the left from time to time and he’ll be more than serviceable as long as it’s not for a full season.
CFN Projection: First Round
   CFN Position Rank: 4
8 40 New England (from Oakland)  Ron Brace, DT Boston College  6-3, 330
Stick him in the middle of the line and let him stop the run. He’s not going to move anywhere and he’s not going to get into the backfield, but he’s really big, too big at times, really strong, and he could be a far less expensive version of his former teammate, B.J. Raji. It would be nice if he could be a bit more of a killer and it would be a plus if he could show some semblance of agility, but that’s not his game. He’ll sit on the inside of a defense as either a nose or a 4-3 tackle and will take on two blockers and make every play that comes to him.
CFN Projection: Second Round
   CFN Position Rank: 5
9 41 New England (from Green Bay)  Darius Butler, CB Connecticut  5-10, 178
A nice prospect going into the off-season, Butler ripped it up at the Combine and his stock shot through the roof. His 4.41 was a breath of fresh air among a slow corner class, and he came up with an NBA guard-like 43” vertical leap and 11’ 2” broad jump. He also stood out in practices at the Senior Bowl. He’s like a gnat when he tries to tackle, he can be brushed aside, and he’s not going to provide much help against the power runners, but that won’t be his job. He’ll handle the smaller, quicker receivers, but he has to get stronger to be able to deal with the bigger more physical ones. He’d get killed by a Calvin Johnson or a Larry Fitzgerald, but he could lock on to a Steve Smith.
CFN Projection: Second Round
    CFN Position Rank: 2
10 42 Buffalo  Jairus Byrd, CB Oregon  5-10, 205 (Jr.)
Slowwwwwwww. He’s a good all-around football player with tremendous ball skills and a nose for always making the big plays. The son of Gill Byrd, a former Pro Bowl defensive back, he has been coached and taught well and will work his tail off to be the best he can be. He won’t back down from a challenge and he’s hardly soft when it comes to getting his nose dirty to make a tackle. And then there’s the speed. To be generous, he’s around a 4.6, and he didn’t get a chance to run at the Combine with a groin problem. He’s not the best athlete and is better at playing football than he is in workouts. Because of his all-around ability, and his versatility, he’ll stick around the league for a long time as a good cog in a secondary, but he’ll never be a No. 1 corner.
CFN Projection: Third Round     CFN Position Rank: 6
11 43 Carolina (from San Francisco) Everette Brown, DE Florida State  6-1, 255 (Jr.)
Is he big enough? He has the athleticism to seamlessly transition into an outside linebacker in any system, but his moved and his pass rushing technique are so strong and so polished that he’s far more intriguing as a lightning-fast end. However, he’s not all that tall and he doesn’t have much room to get too much bigger, so this might be it. While he’s not a big-time run stopper, and the jury is out on whether or not he could become an all-around playmaker at linebacker, he’ll work to make himself better and has the character to try to become the best he can be. If nothing else, he’ll be a fun pass rushing toy for a defensive coordinator to play with.
CFN Projection: First Round
   CFN Position Rank: 3
12 44 Miami (from Washington)  Pat White, QB/WR West Virginia 6-1, 197
Forget about what White isn’t and focus on what he is, and also throw out the notion of what a pro style quarterback needs to be. Yes, White will likely make his money as a receiver and a slash type of pro, but he wants to be a quarterback and someone will give him a shot … at least for a few practices. No, White isn’t going to be Peyton Manning, and no, he won’t be Michael Vick; he doesn’t have the arm. But what he can be is a devastating weapon to use in a Wildcat-like formation or 10-of-15 plays a game and he’ll force opposing defensive coordinators to spend at least a day to prep for him. While he doesn’t have elite speed, he’ll effortlessly run for first downs and he has a more accurate, stronger arm than he gets credit for. More than anything else, he’s a winner. A peerless leader who’s tough as nails, he’ll have no problem earning the respect of his teammates. Any offensive coordinator worth his salt will be drooling at the possibilities.
CFN Projection: Third Round, but as an all-around prospect    CFN Position Rank: 6
13 45 NY Giants (from New Orleans)   Clint Sintim, LB Virginia  6-3, 250
He made himself into a top pro prospect. A good player early in his career, he took things to another level once it was salary-drive time and showed he could become a good pass rusher. Able to be used like a smallish defensive end, and able to move inside if absolutely needed, he’s a versatile all-around playmaker who should grow into a nice pass rusher and a good starter. Without a blazing burst and with a lack of speed he’s not going to be an elite sack artist, but he should be a great piece of the puzzle and ultra-valuable because of his versatility.
CFN Projection: Second Round
   CFN Position Rank: 4
14 46 Houston   Connor Barwin, LB Cincinnati  6-4, 255
Part lineman, part linebacker, Barwin has tremendous speed, running a 4.59 at the Combine, and showing stunning athleticism for a player of his size. He was far, far quicker than Aaron Curry and was just as quick than all the other linebackers outside of Marcus Freeman in the shuttle drill. He’s not all that strong, at least not strong enough to be a regular on the line, and he needs a lot of technique work, but he has the fire and the aggressiveness to make himself better. There’s a high upside as a potentially lethal pass rusher with a little bit of time.
CFN Projection: Third Round
   CFN Position Rank: 8
15 47 Oakland (from San Diego through New England)   Michael Mitchell, S Ohio 6-1, 215
He hits like a linebacker and has a terrific blend of size and speed. However, he wasn't anything special for the Bobcats making 62 tackles, finishing fourth on the team, with a sack with three picks. Strictly a developmental prospect, he was never considered much of a pro prospect but could see time in a camp.
CFN Projection: Free Agent
   CFN Position Rank: NR
16 48 Denver  Darcel McBath, FS Texas Tech 6-1, 200
He’s just a nice all-around football player with good size, decent athleticism, and good ball skills. He’s not going to blow anyone up and he’s a competent tackler, if not a great one, but he’s great when the ball is in the air and will find a spot immediately on special teams. A former corner, he moves like one and could put up big-time interception numbers in the right package. A self-starter and a hard worker, he’ll make himself a long-time pro.
CFN Projection: Third Round
   CFN Position Rank: 6
17 49 Seattle (from Chicago)   Max Unger, C Oregon 6-4, 310
Versatility alone will make Unger a pro for the next decade. He’ll always find a spot somewhere on the line. Extremely quick and terrific in pass protection, the former Duck is great at getting on the move and he’s strong in pass protection. While he could be a whale of a guard in the right system, he’s not a dominant pounder and will occasionally have problems with the bigger, beefier linemen. However, against the quicker ones, forget about it. Unger won’t allow much in the way of an interior pass rush.
CFN Projection: Second Round
   CFN Position Rank: 2
18 50 Cleveland (from Tampa Bay)   Mohamed Massaquoi, WR Georgia 6-1, 205
While he never lived up to the immense prep hype, he grew into a dependable all-around playmaker for the Bulldogs by the end of his career. He’s not going to be a star, but he’s going to be a very, very good, reliable pro for a long time because he does all the things coaches like. He blocks, he’s tough, he goes over the middle, and he’ll do whatever he needs to do. A good athlete, he has just enough speed to get by. However, he’s just not that good a receiver. He’ll make too many drops and will disappear for long stretches. While he’ll be a nice part of an offense, he’ll never be great.
CFN Projection: Third Round
   CFN Position Rank: 15
19 51 Buffalo (from Dallas)  Andrew Levitre, OG Oregon State 6-3, 305
Where will he play? A college left tackle, he’s not quick enough start on the outside and he’s not powerful enough to be a star on the inside. Even so, he’s an athletic, versatile blocker who’s very smart, doesn’t make mistakes, and is ultra-reliable. He can move to tackle if absolutely needed, but he’ll end up spending his career likely at left guard. More of a technician than a road grater, he’ll have to get a bit stronger.
CFN Projection: Second Round
   CFN Position Rank: 2
20 52 Cleveland (from NY Jets)   David Veikune, DE Hawaii  6-4, 255
A way undersized, way productive pass rusher who can be used in a variety of ways, he has a good enough motor to be a third down specialist as a 4-3 end, or he could be developed into an outside linebacker in a 3-4. Ridiculously strong, he needs to do a better job of translating his freakish weight room strength to the field. Still a wee bit of an unknown since he didn’t blow up until his final year at Hawaii, he could be underdrafted because he doesn’t have the biggest buzz. That could be a big mistake. He’ll not only make a roster, but he could be an instant starter.
CFN Projection: Fourth Round
   CFN Position Rank: 9
21 53 Philadelphia   LeSean McCoy, RB Pitt 5-11, 200 (Soph.)
“Shady” will be the ideal back for anyone with another back on the roster with some power. McCoy is a quick back who can seamlessly slide in and out of the hole, can cut on a dime, and proved he can be used as a workhorse, a receiver, and do everything needed to help out an offense. While he can cut in a Houston Texan-like, zone-blocking offense like Steve Slaton, he doesn’t have the same blazing burst that Slaton and other smaller backs have at the next level. While he won’t block anyone and he’s too small to not get help from a second runner in a rotation, he’s a natural producer who’ll make a big splash and be a very, very good pro for a long time.
CFN Projection: First Round
   CFN Position Rank: 3
22 54 Minnesota   Phil Loadholt, OT Oklahoma 6-7, 335
Loadholt is a classic case of a prospect getting a little negative momentum and then seeing it steamroll. It’s like scouts are looking for the problems in his game rather than focus on what he is and the good things that he did. No, he’s not the most nimble of tackles, but he proved he could keep up and thrive in the OU up-tempo offense and did a great job of keeping Sam Bradford upright. The positive is his size … he’s huge, and not in a doughy sort of way. He’s tall, long, and fantastic at getting his arms extended and punching defenders just enough to give the quarterback the extra half-click needed. Yes, he has problems against the fastest of speed rushers, but it’s not like he doesn’t win his share of battles. He might be pigeonholed as a right side blocker because his lack of foot quickness, but he’ll be better than expected on the left.
CFN Projection: Second Round
   CFN Position Rank: 5
23 55 Atlanta  William Moore, SS Missouri 6-1, 220
After his junior year he looked like he’d be a sure-thing, superstar Pro Bowl performer the second he decided to go pro. He came back for his senior year and wasn’t the same playmaker. On sheer skills and physical ability he’s the best safety in the draft. He’s tough, a good tackler, and fast, but he could stand to get a bit stronger after only coming up with 16 reps on the bench at the Combine. Did he get by on his physical ability as a junior and was he exposed a bit as a senior? Not necessarily, but that’s the big question about his instincts. There’s no questioning his work ethic or his character, and he’ll be a leader in the locker room, but there might be limitations on how much he ends up producing if he’s asked to do more than stop the run.
CFN Projection: Second Round
    CFN Position Rank: 7
24 56 Indianapolis (from Miami)  Fili Moala, DT USC  6-4, 300
While he’s a little old, he’ll be 24 when he starts his NFL career, and he’s a finished product with little upside, he can still get bigger with room to get stronger on his large frame. He’s big, athletic, and moves extremely well, but he disappears too often in games and doesn’t have a full-time motor; he doesn’t make too many plays just by trying hard. If he’s developed the right way, and a fire is lit under him, he could become a strong interior pass rusher and he could flourish as long as he’s not asked to be the anchor of a front four. He’s not going to do much as a nose in a 3-4, but he could occasionally play end if absolutely needed.
CFN Projection: Third Round
   CFN Position Rank: 6
25 57 Baltimore  Paul Kruger, Utah DE 6-3, 265 (3rd year Soph.)
One of the more interesting prospects with a wild story, he was beaten up and stabbed in a fight, was lucky to live, spent two years on an LDS Church mission, and blew up into one of the stars on last year’s unbeaten Ute team. A mature, athletic pass rusher who always goes full-tilt, he’s ready to go right now. However, this is it. While he can still get a bit bigger, this is basically it. There’s a ceiling on how good he can become, and he’s not the type of player who’ll blossom in three years. While he’s not elite in any one area, he doesn’t have a major, glaring weakness. There are going to be health issues considering all the crazy things that have happened to his insides from various surgeries, but he could be a poor man’s Chris Long.
CFN Projection: Second Round
   CFN Position Rank: 5
26 58 New England  Sebastian Vollmer, OT Houston 6-7, 315
An extremely interesting prospect with size, attitude, and room to grow. He’s just scratching the surface on what he can do, but who wants to invest the time and effort? He needs to get a lot stronger and he needs to improve his quickness, but he’s never going to be a top athlete and he can’t play left tackle.
CFN Projection: Sixth Round
   CFN Position Rank: 20
27 59 Carolina   Sherrod Martin, S Troy 6-1, 198
Troy has become a pipeline of good defensive backs, and he has the raw skills to be the best and most versatile of the bunch. The question is whether or not someone can coach him up in a big hurry. He’ll be 25 when the season starts and he needs technique work as a corner, but the size, speed, and potential are all there. He’s a big defensive back with excellent range and decent wheels that could make him a starter at free safety, but he’s not a good enough tackler to be counted on right away at anywhere but corner. With his quickness and his upside, albeit with a range of about two years, he’ll be a potential boom pick.
CFN Projection: Third Round
   CFN Position Rank: 8
28 60 New York Giants  William Beatty, OT Connecticut 6-6, 308
On of the high-rising prospects since the end of the season, his athleticism has been eye-opening and he’s done a great job of bulking up. He still has room to add more weight and still not lose a step. He moves well from side to side and he did a great job against top pass rushers, even though Connecticut didn’t exactly wing it around. If he gets the right coach who can light a fire under him and keep him motivated, he could be special. He wouldn’t be a great fit on a power running offense, even though he did a great job of run blocking in college, and would be stronger in a West Coast type of attack where he’s able to get on the move. He’ll need to get the motor running at full-tilt all the time, but with his combination of size and quickness, he’ll be worth the risk.
CFN Projection: Second Round
   CFN Position Rank: 6
29 61 Miami (from Indianapolis)   Sean Smith, FS/CB Utah 6-3, 210 (Jr.)
A freakishly good all-around defender, Smith can be used as a very tall, very aggressive corner, or he could grow into an elite free safety. He moves like a much smaller player with 4.5 speed and decent quickness, and he’ll have no problems holding his own with bigger receivers once he gets a little bit stronger. When he puts on the extra bulk, and he will, he’ll be a terror of a safety. He’s not fluid enough to be a regular at corner, even though that’s where he’ll be tried out at first, but don’t be shocked if he’s asked to switch positions early on. He could even become a wide receiver if he’s willing to put in the time to use his combination of speed and size to create major mismatches.
CFN Projection: Second Round
   CFN Position Rank: 5
30 62 Tennessee  Sen’Derrick Marks, DT Auburn  6-1, 305 (Jr.)
Extremely quick and extremely active, he was an undersized defensive tackle at times and a huge defensive end at others. A red-hot prospect after his sophomore year, he was considered a possible top ten talent. But his junior year was a major disappointment as he struggled with the stronger offensive linemen, along with ankle problems, and didn’t improve as a pass rusher. Even so, he could be an ideal 3-4 end if he can get healthy and could be a major steal. He needs to get stronger and he needs to show he can hold up when he’s getting blasted, but he has the athleticism that can’t be coached.
CFN Projection: Third Round
   CFN Position Rank: 8
31 63 Arizona   Cody Brown, LB Connecticut  6-2, 245
While he’ll be considered for defensive end duty, he needs to be a regular linebacker. Ultra-tough, very aggressive and a big hitter, he’s a tone-setting player who’ll make several highlight reel plays when he gets a head of steam. However, he’s not an NFL pass rusher despite his quickness. Linebacker-sized, he plays much bigger with good strength and a long frame. Now he has to find a role and he has to settle in and become a consistent factor off the line. He might need a little work, but he’s a safe pick as long as he has a fire lit under him.
CFN Projection: Third Round
   CFN Position Rank: 7
32 64 Denver (from Pittsburgh)   Richard Quinn, TE North Carolina  6-4, 260  
One of the biggest question marks in the draft, he’s big, very strong, and a good blocker with refined technique; he could be thrown on a team right away and produce for a running game. Can he catch? He’s hardly a finished product and is an unknown because he was almost never used for the UNC passing attack. And then came the workouts and the post-season when he showed good catching skills, or at least good enough to get by. He needs the right offense and he isn’t going to shine if he’s part of a high-octane passing attack. Ask him to be a regular on a team that pounds away, and he could be a solid starter.
CFN Projection: Third Round    CFN Position Rank: 8

- 2009 NFL Draft Breakdown and Analysis
1st Round
| 3rd Round | 4th Round | 5th Round | 6th Round | 7th Round