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2010 NFL Draft - Offensive Tackle Rankings
Oklahoma State OT Russell Okung
Oklahoma State OT Russell Okung
CollegeFootballNews.com
Posted Apr 8, 2010


It's a strong year for offensive tackles with a few, like Iowa's Bryan Bulaga, Oklahoma's Trent Williams, and Oklahoma State's Russell Okung, ready to step in and start right away. Check out the CFN ranking of the top offensive tackles along with the most overrated and underrated prospects.

2010 NFL Draft Position Rankings

Offensive Tackles


By Pete Fiutak

2010 CFN Talent Rankings
- 1st Rounders
- 2nd Rounders
- 3rd Rounders
- 4th Rounders
- 5th Rounders
- 6th Rounders
- 7th Rounders 
- Top Free Agent Talents 

2010 CFN Position Rankings & Analysis

- QBs | RBs | WRs | TEs
- Cs | OTs | OGs | DEs
- DTs | ILBs | OLBs
- Ss | CBs

2010 NFL Combine Quick Looks & Post-Combine Rankings

- QBs | RBs | WRs | TEs
- Cs | OTs | OGs | DEs
- DTs | ILBs | OLBs
- Ss | CBs

2010 NFL Combine Results
- QBs | RBs | WRs | TEs
- Cs | OTs | OGs | DEs
- DTs | ILBs | OLBs
- Ss | CBs 

2010 NFL Combine
- Offensive Winners  
- Offensive Losers 
- Defensive Winners 
- Defensive Losers

This Class Is … Top heavy. The top ten (or so) prospects are terrific with tremendous upside, including almost certain Pro Bowlers in Russell Okung, Trent Williams, and Bryan Bulaga, but the cliff drops off in a big hurry.

The Best Value Pick Will Be … Selvish Capers, West Virginia
Most Underrated … Kyle Jolly, North Carolina
Most Overrated … Bruce Campbell, Maryland
The Deep, Deep Sleeper Is … Ramon Harewood, Morehouse

1. Russell Okung, Oklahoma State 6-5, 307
Possibly the best prospect in the draft, Okung has excellent size, great feet, and the production to suggest he could be an anchor for the next decade. He has terrific technique, blasts away in the running game, and doesn’t have any one glaring negative. While there are a few little issues here and there, he’s not always consistent with his technique, there’s nothing to be worried about. He’s a special blocker.
CFN Projection: First Round

2. Trent Williams, Oklahoma 6-5, 315
Already a good prospect before Indianapolis, he blew it up at the Combine running a 4.88 in the 40 and was extremely athletic. In 2008 he was the best all-around blocker on the nation’s best offensive line, and he has all the traits needed for a left tackle. He’s a quick and effective pass blocker, a devastating bulldozer for the ground game, and can succeed on either the left or right side. He needs to get stronger, he only came up with 23 reps on the bench, but he plays stronger. Does he have the make-up to be an anchor? There are questions about his attitude.
CFN Projection: First Round

3. Bryan Bulaga, Iowa 6-5, 314 (Jr.)
One of the most technically sound blockers in the draft. He’s big, moves effortless, and is young with the upside to still grow into a better, stronger player. He doesn’t just block, he buries, and when a hard yard is needed he comes up with the hit. While he worked out well, on tape he had a few problems with the pure speed rushers. He looks the part and has all the basics, and he could be just scratching the surface. He’ll play somewhere for a long, long time and can move to guard if he struggles at all at left tackle.
CFN Projection: First Round

4. Anthony Davis, Rutgers 6-5, 323 (Jr.)
A superstar recruit for Rutgers, he was good, but he didn’t have the career expected. It’s all there with perfect size, good quickness, and the mentality to work as a pass protector on the left side. The issue is his make-up. Extremely undisciplined, he never reached his full potential after failing to adhere to team rules. He wasn’t nearly consistent enough considering his skills and when he wasn’t concentrating, he was beaten by far lesser players. His size could also be a problem and will have to stay away from the table. Even with all the problems and concerns, he could be a superstar with the right coaching and if the light bulb goes on.
CFN Projection: First Round

5. Charles Brown, USC 6-5, 303
He had a rough Combine, didn’t move all that well, and he only came up with 21 reps on the bench. But he measured well, is big with a nice frame, and he looks better on film than he does in workouts. He uses his size extremely well and does a great job of getting on the move and making blocks down the field. While he’s great at dominating smallish defenders, he’s not a mauler of a run blocker and needs to get stronger. There’s good upside, but he’ll only be right for certain teams and certain styles. Forget about him on a power team.
CFN Projection: Second Round

6. Bruce Campbell, Maryland 6-6, 314
He came up with one of the greatest workouts in Combine history blazing a 4.84 40 and 34 reps on the bench. He looked cut, showed off the body of a tight end, and moved like a much smaller player. The athleticism is unquestioned, but he needs a ton of work at becoming a football player. Not being able to block is usually an issue for an NFL tackle, and he doesn’t use his strength of athleticism nearly enough. Someone will fall in love with the idea of his athleticism and will take the chance on getting a special talent, but it’s buyer beware.
CFN Projection: First Round

7. Rodger Saffold, Indiana 6-5, 316
A nice athlete who did a fantastic job in workouts and at the Combine. He was quick, smooth, and athletic enough to prove he could be a rock-solid left tackle with great balance and good body control. Very productive and good against the better Big Ten pass rushers, he has the film to back up his workouts. The one problem is his meanness. He’s a good blocker, but he’s not going to throw a defender up into the fifth row. While he worked out well as a tackle prospect, he’ll probably spend the second half of his career at guard.
CFN Projection: Second Round

8. Selvish Capers, West Virginia 6-5, 308
A terrific athlete was has good explosion in his legs, he now needs to get stronger and prove to be a better run blocker. He’s great for a zone-blocking scheme, but he only came up with 19 reps on the bench and he has to hit a weight room to fill out his tall, skinny frame. A former tight end, he moves well and could be just scratching the surface of how good he’ll become. Compared to a few of the other athletic tackle prospects, he should be a cheaper, safer pick outside of the top 50.
CFN Projection: Second Round

9. Kyle Calloway, Iowa 6-7, 323
He’s really big, is tough to get knock off his base, and has great length making him tough to get around. However, he has the dreaded Right Tackle Only tag. He’s one of the slowest offensive linemen who’ll get drafted and doesn’t have the raw skills to cover a quarterback’s blind side, but he has a great attitude, is experienced, and he should be able to step in and play from Day One.
CFN Projection: Third Round

10. Sam Young, Notre Dame 6-8, 316
If Jimmy Clausen was Charlie Weis’s No. 1 recruit, Young was No. 1A. A huge get for the program, literally, he was good, but wasn’t nearly as good as his hype and promise. Way too stiff, not enough of a killer for the running game, and not quick enough to handle the faster speed rushers, he’ll struggle at left tackle and is too tall to play guard. For all his problems, he wants to be a good player and will work to become better. With his experience and his size he should stick around the league for a while, but there’s a hard ceiling on what he can do.
CFN Projection: Fourth Round

11. Tony Washington, Abilene Christian 6-6, 311
Two issues. 1) He didn’t play against a high level of competition, because 2) he wasn’t able to go to LSU because of his grades and after being convicted of having sex with a relative. On the field, he was fantastic at the lower level and showed tremendous 5.19 speed and came up with 33 reps at the Combine. He moves well, works extremely hard, and with the past behind him, should grow into a nice player with a little more time. He needs technique work and he has to get used to playing against defenders at his own level. Outside of Bruce Campbell, he’s one of the draft’s biggest boom or bust picks.
CFN Projection: Fourth Round

12. Jared Veldheer, Hillsdale 6-8, 312
Very, very, big and very, very long, he’s still trying to fill out his frame after working to get to over 300 pounds. A terrific pass blocker at the lower level he erased all the mediocre talent he faced and showed the 5.09 speed and athleticism that most of the big-school tackle prospects would’ve dreamed of coming up with. He’s not used to beating up defenders and will have to get used to playing mean enough to get the attitude to match his athleticism. While he’s not polished, he has limitless upside.
CFN Projection: Third Round

13. Adam Ulatoski, Texas 6-5, 300
While he did a good job of being a key cog on a national title-level offense, he doesn’t have the bulk or the skills to translate to the next level. He’s not big enough or strong enough to be a power-run blocker, and he’s not quick enough to match up with a zone-blocking scheme. Basically, there isn’t a spot for him, but he was a good football player at a high level and could hang around the league for a long time as a solid backup.
CFN Projection: Fifth Round

14. Jason Fox, Miami 6-7, 303
A great athlete with the frame to get far bigger, he’s a high-character former tight end who moves well, is great on the move, and can play several spots on the line even though he’s not all that bulky. He needs to hit the weight room and he’s not going to flatten anyone, but he could be great in the right finesse scheme and he could be scratching the surface on his potential. It’s going to take a little while, but he has great upside for a few years down the road.
CFN Projection: Fourth Round

15. Ciron Black, LSU 6-5, 327
Few prospects fell further, faster. There was a time when he was considered a possible top 15 pick, but he didn’t improve, struggled with his weight, and turned out to be really, really slow and lumbering. While he spent his career at tackle, he doesn’t have the athleticism to stay on the outside and will almost certainly have to spend his career at guard. He’s experienced, huge, and has good character, but he doesn’t have the raw skills to be anything more than a flier if he can’t get in better shape and get a bit quicker.
CFN Projection: Fifth Round

16. Zane Beadles, Utah 6-4, 310
Very experienced and very productive, he was a great blocker for a fantastic Utah offensive line. He was a great leader and he’s always working with a great motor. However, he’s not quick, needs to get a bit bigger, and doesn’t quite have the power to dominate any end with size. He’ll likely make his money at guard and could stay in the league for a while because of his intangibles and versatility, but he needs more talented players around him.
CFN Projection: Fourth Round

17. Chris Scott, Tennessee 6-5, 319
A mauler of a run blocker who’ll likely end up spending his career at guard, he’s very strong, a nice pass blocker, and was, arguably, the best blocker on a terrific Volunteer line. Able to play almost anywhere on the line, his versatility alone should keep him on a roster as a backup, at least. He needs to get physically stronger (he’s not going to be able to overpower linemen in the NFL like he did in college) to be a great guard, and he needs technique work, but he could be a low-risk pick late.
CFN Projection: Sixth Round

18. Kyle Jolly, North Carolina 6-6, 311
While not that strong on the bench at the Combine with just 20 reps, he was quick, showed good athleticism, and looked good enough to match his solid college production. He’s a high-character player with good technique and the fire to be great, but he’s not nearly physical enough. Forget about him powering over anyone, but he’ll be fine if he doesn’t have to move too much and could blossom if he all of a sudden gets a lot stronger. While he won’t be a star, he should be a terrific, versatile backup.
CFN Projection: Fifth Round

19. Cole Pemberton, Colorado State 6-7, 315
He has a great frame and room to get bigger, and now he has to get into a weight room and not come out until he has added far more bulk and has gotten a lot stronger. The 18 reps on the bench at the Combine were awful, and he was lumbering through the drills. He has excellent size and he’s a fighter who’ll battle, but he’s not quick enough to ever be on the left side and can’t handle speed rushers.
CFN Projection: Sixth Round

20. Ramon Harewood, Morehouse 6-6, 353
New to the game, he didn’t pick it up until late after being raised in Barbados. Even though he’s extremely raw and needs a ton of technique work, he’s very, very big, moves extremely well, and hits like a ton of bricks. He was simply bigger and stronger than everyone else at the lower level, but if he’s given a few years with the right coach, he could be a late-round find.
CFN Projection: Sixth Round

21. Ed Wang, Virginia Tech 6-5, 314
Extremely productive, he also showed up well in workouts running a great 5.21 at the Combine to go along with 29 reps. He has the size and he knows how to use it with good drive as a run blocker and is versatile enough to see time at several spots. He needs to get a bit bigger, but he might have maxed out on his bulk without getting puffy. He’s inconsistent and he doesn’t destroy defenders, and he might need time to find the right position. He’s just good enough to play almost anywhere on the line, but he’s not great enough to start.
CFN Projection: Sixth Round

22. Thomas Welch, Vanderbilt 6-6, 307
A very nice college player, he’s a tough, feisty blocker who fights well and is a smart player who doesn’t make mistakes. He’s not all that big and needs to fill out his frame, and he has a shaky ankle and durability issues. There’s a chance he could stick on a roster for a little while because he has the potential to grow into a solid backup tackle, but he needs work and needs to be in the right offense.
CFN Projection: Free Agent

23. Nic Richmond, TCU 6-7, 307
A tall blocker who did a nice job last year, he’s a late bloomer who’s all about upside. He slides well, has good athleticism, and has the mean streak needed to flatten defenders. He needs a ton of work, though, and he needs reps. He’s a practice squad player who needs a few years to develop.
CFN Projection: Free Agent

24. Casey Knips, North Dakota State 6-7, 308
Tall with a lot of room to grow more into his frame. He has surprising quickness for his size and plays with nice balance; he’s smooth. However, he’s not a road grader and he’ll need the right type of zone scheme to be any sort of a factor right away. He needs work, but he’ll most likely be on a lot of short lists of top free agents to warrant a look.
CFN Projection: Free Agent

25. Nick Stringer, Kansas State 6-5, 281
Really small, but he’s a blaster who uses what he has extremely well. He’s a tough, feisty blocker who doesn’t have the bulk to be a regular starter. He tries hard, but he’ll simply not have enough size to be a regular in the rotation. He’s got the attitude, though, to be on a roster just because he’ll Rudy it up in practices.
CFN Projection: Free Agent

26. Matt Kopa, Stanford
27. Austin Howard, Northern Iowa
28. Vince Vance, Georgia
29. Will Barker, Virginia
30. Andre Barbour, Eastern Kentucky
31. Drew Davis, Alabama
32. Marlon Winn, Texas Tech
33. Andrew McCain, Auburn
34. Ali Villanueva, Army
35. Andrew McCain, Auburn