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2010 NFL Draft - Defensive Tackle Rankings
Linval Joseph, Jared Odrick, & Cam Thomas
Linval Joseph, Jared Odrick, & Cam Thomas
CollegeFootballNews.com
Posted Apr 9, 2010


Yeah, Ndamukong Suh and Gerald McCoy are the stars, but this is an all-timer class of defensive tackles thanks to prospects like ECU's Linval Joseph, Penn State's Jared Odrick, and UNC's Cam Thomas. Check out the CFN ranking of the top DTs along with the most overrated and underrated prospects.

2010 NFL Draft Position Rankings

Defensive Tackles


By Pete Fiutak

2010 CFN Talent Rankings
- 1st Rounders
- 2nd Rounders
- 3rd Rounders
- 4th Rounders
- 5th Rounders
- 6th Rounders
- 7th Rounders 
- Top Free Agent Talents 

2010 CFN Position Rankings & Analysis

- QBs | RBs | WRs | TEs
- Cs | OTs | OGs | DEs
- DTs | ILBs | OLBs
- Ss | CBs

2010 NFL Combine Quick Looks & Post-Combine Rankings

- QBs | RBs | WRs | TEs
- Cs | OTs | OGs | DEs
- DTs | ILBs | OLBs
- Ss | CBs

2010 NFL Combine Results
- QBs | RBs | WRs | TEs
- Cs | OTs | OGs | DEs
- DTs | ILBs | OLBs
- Ss | CBs 

2010 NFL Combine
- Offensive Winners  
- Offensive Losers 
- Defensive Winners 
- Defensive Losers

This Class Is … All-timer good. Suh and McCoy are already being put in the Hall of Fame, while there are at least ten other very strong starting prospects and more excellent gems in the rough. There’s talent to burn.

The Best Value Pick Will Be … Linval Joseph, East Carolina
Most Underrated … Torrell Troup, UCF
Most Overrated … Al Woods, LSU
The Deep, Deep Sleeper Is … Jimmy Saddler-McQueen, Texas A&M-Kingsville

1. Ndamukong Suh, Nebraska 6-4, 307
It’s almost as if everyone is thinking too hard about this. Suh is the near-perfect tackle prospect with the strength to work on the nose if needed, and the quickness and speed to be a 3-4 end or a one-gap playmaker. An all-timer of a stat-sheet filler for a college defensive tackle, he beat up blockers and blew past the slower ones. The 32 reps and the 4.98 40 at the Combine only tells half the story; he moved like a much smaller player. The only real knock is that it took a while for the light to go on and he could have issues with his weight if he’s not careful, but if he wants it, he’ll be a special anchor for the next decade. The only other question is if he can change up his game a little bit to adjust to the higher level; he’s not going to be stronger than everyone else like he was in college and he’ll have to be a bit sharper technique-wise.
CFN Projection: Top Five Overall

2. Gerald McCoy, Oklahoma 6-4, 295
Extremely quick and unblockable at times, he’s a superior athlete for his size and doesn’t get moved easily. The knock will be his lack of weight room strength after a miserable 23 reps at the Combine, and, compared to Ndamukong Suh, he wasn’t significantly quicker in the drills or more athletic in the workout. However, he’s a high character guy who’s a dream for coaches. He loves football, wants to be the best player possible, and has always played great at the highest of levels. Outside if his bench in Indy, the only other knock is his potential lack of versatility. He’s not a nose and he likely will have to be a tackle in a 4-3 or an end in a 3-4. That’s looking for a problem for a player who’ll be special for a long, long time.
CFN Projection: Top Five Overall

3. Dan Williams, Tennessee 6-2, 327
Everyone will focus on Ndamukong Suh and Gerald McCoy, and rightly so, but Williams isn’t as far behind prospect-wise as some might think. Very big and very tough, he’s a brick of granite who can sit in the middle of the line and swallow everything up. An ideal two-gap tackle, he’s quick for his size once he gets engaged. He could stand to get stronger after a mediocre 27 lifts at the Combine, and he was a bit of a one-year wonder who only blossomed after Monte Kiffin took over the defense, and he won’t get into the backfield, but he can be a top run stopper for a long time.
CFN Projection: First Round

4. Tyson Alualu, California 6-3, 295 (DE)
Unblockable at times, he’s too quick for most lumbering linemen and he showed off his athleticism with a dominant week at the Senior Bowl. He’s not a load and he’s not going to be anyone’s anchor, but he’s an ideal 3-4 end and could be more than fine as a 4-3 one-gap tackle. Very smart with tremendous character and work-ethic, he’s always working and brings it on every play. While he needs to get stronger and is a bit too much of a tweener, he’ll be the type of player everyone loves because of his coachability and versatility.
CFN Projection: Second Round

5. Brian Price, UCLA 6-1, 303
While he’s not all that big and he’s a short, squatty defender, he’s extremely quick and is one of the strongest tackles in the draft. He’s always working, always working, and always making plays as both an interior pass rusher and a tough rock against the run. Athletic for his size, he should be a great interior pass rusher at the next level. He needs to get into better overall shape and he needs to show that he wants to run through a wall when it comes to the little things it’ll take to get better, but his versatility and his disruptiveness will work well in just about any defense.
CFN Projection: Second Round

6. Jared Odrick, Penn State 6-5, 304
While there was an off-the-field incident and there are going to be some question marks about his character and his maturity, he’s fine. There’s no knucklehead factor here. He’s strong and athletic with the quickness to close a hole in a heartbeat. An anchor and a leader, he’s the type of lineman that other players work around. He’s a bit thin for his size and will likely get pushed around a wee bit at the next level, but he can be used just about anywhere on the line and he’ll produce.
CFN Projection: First Round

7. Terrence Cody, Alabama 6-5, 354
You know exactly what you’re getting. Cody isn’t going to touch a quarterback, he’s going to have weight problems and will have a ton of bad fat that won’t go away, but he’ll also sit in the middle of a line and won’t move. He’s the textbook definition of an anchor with surprising lateral quickness for a player of his size. While he’s not a three-down lineman and he isn’t known for being the hardest worker around, if you want a pure run stuffer, he might be the best in the draft if he can keep his weight around 350.
CFN Projection: Third Round

8. Lamarr Houston, Texas 6-3, 305
An interesting player with an interesting career, he was a 100-meter sprinter in high school and has kept much of his athleticism after bulking up to over 300 pounds. He’s a great worker who’s always going full-tilt and he can play anywhere in any scheme. The down side is his résumé, which was fine, but nothing amazing from a decent Texas career. Not as slippery and not as creative a pass rusher as he needs to be, once he’s blocked he stays blocked. He’ll be at his best playing as a one-gap playmaker whose job is get into the backfield and provide pressure.
CFN Projection: Third Round

9. Cam Thomas, North Carolina 6-4, 330
One of the best pure defensive tackles in the draft, he’s not going to fly into the backfield but he’ll be a brick wall against the run. After a great Combine with 31 reps and showing off the pure bulk everyone wants in the middle of the line, his stock quickly rose. Unlike Terrence Cody, Thomas is really big but without a ton of bad weight; he’s just strong. While he had a good Tar Heel career, he didn’t have a great one and struggled to shake some ankle problems. His biggest problem is he slow motor and a lax attitude that’ll turn off more than a few teams; he’ll need a coach to do some butt-kicking on a regular basis.
CFN Projection: Third Round

10. Geno Atkins, Georgia 6-1, 293
While he’s a little bit light and he doesn’t have any room to get bigger, he’s extremely strong, extremely quick, and has tremendous upside for the right defense. He won’t be for everyone, he can’t play on the nose and will likely flourish as a 3-4 end, but after a Combine with 34 reps on the bench and an eye-popping 4.75 40, someone will be extremely happy to get him and turn him loose. Now he needs to play up to his talent and potential and has to show that he wants to be a real, live player after getting benched for a stretch last year.
CFN Projection: Third Round

11. D’Anthony Smith, Louisiana Tech 6-2, 304
A big body with good all-around skills, he’ll come cheap compared to several other tackle prospects and he’ll be a great value. He’s quick into the backfield and can be used either as a 3-4 end or a 4-3 tackle and be just as effective. While he got by because he was bigger and more athletic than everyone else, he’s not going to be able to overpower anyone at the next level and he’s not functionally strong enough to hold up too well against NFL double teams. Can he show the motor and want-to needed to be great? If he kicks it in, there’s excellent upside.
CFN Projection: Third Round

12. Arthur Jones, Syracuse 6-3, 301
The only positive on a bad Syracuse defensive front, he was often a one-man gang as an underappreciated star on a struggling team. Strong and great against the run, he’s tough when he needs to be and he’s quick enough to get into the backfield from time to time. There’s a problem with his conditioning and he’ll break down from time to time unless he ramps up his workouts a few levels. The potential is there to be a long-time contributor, but he has to want it and he has to be cool with getting kicked around a bit by the coaches.
CFN Projection: Fourth Round

13. Torrell Troup, UCF 6-3, 314
Very big and very strong, he’s a physical interior presence who can be plugged in on the nose and hold his own. Double teams aren’t a problem for him and he’s always working and he always has the motor going full tilt. However, he’s not going anywhere. There’s no mobility and he’ll never get into the backfield. There’s a limit on where he can play and what he can do, but he should hang around the league for a long time as a nice piece of a puzzle.
CFN Projection: Third Round

14. Earl Mitchell, Arizona 6-2, 296
An okay prospect after the season ended, his stock shot up after some terrific workouts including a shocking Combine tearing off a 4.7 40 and he moved well in the short drills. He’s still a work in progress, he isn’t huge, and he’ll likely be limited to being a two-gap tackle, but his athleticism is intriguing and his quickness, character, and work ethic are enough to earn him a spot in someone’s rotation.
CFN Projection: Fourth Round

15. Corey Peters, Kentucky 6-3, 300
A solid, underappreciated prospect with good lateral movement and excellent quickness, he’s not going to be an anchor and he needs to be far more creative with his moves. A very productive playmaker at a high level, he’s smart, experienced, and has better intangibles than talent. There’s a limit on what he can do and he doesn’t have NFL skills at any level, but he’ll be a hard-worker who could grow into a nice backup who sticks around for a long time.
CFN Projection: Fifth Round

16. Jeff Owens, Georgia 6-1, 304
Not big, not all that beefy, and he doesn’t look the part, but he’s insanely strong, coming up with 44 reps on the bench at the Combine, and he moves well. The raw skills are there to be bull of a run stopper in a rotation, and he’ll always give a full day’s work with a non-stop motor. However, he’s a better prospect than a football player, has had problems getting past a knee injury suffered a few years ago, and there’s no athleticism.
CFN Projection: Fourth Round

17. Mike Neal, Purdue 6-3, 294
While he’s not all that big and he’s a one-gap only tackle who’ll only be useful if he gets into the backfield, he’s just quick enough and just strong enough to make a roster and be a key backup. Tremendous at times in off-season workouts, he looks the part with a great body and excellent weightroom strength. Better in practices than on the field, he’s limited in what he can do and has to be in the right scheme to succeed.
CFN Projection: Fourth Round

18. Linval Joseph, East Carolina 6-4, 328
A very big stick in the mud, he can be put in the middle of the line and everyone can work around him. He’s massive with long arms and phenomenal strength coming up with 39 reps at the Combine. While he has good tools, he’s really, really raw and will need time to develop into his size and strength. More of a prospect than a sure thing, he’ll be taken by someone who’ll see a big wad of clay that could be molded into a superstar. The upside is limitless and he could be a top nose tackle who allows everyone else to shine.
CFN Projection: Second Round

19. Aleric Mullins, North Carolina 6-1, 321
An interesting prospect with stunning athleticism on a huge frame. He’s short, squatty, and he’s not all that huge anywhere but around the middle, but he gets off the ball in a heartbeat and has interesting tools worth developing. But does he want to do the work needed? He struggled with his academics and was in a constant battle to get eligible, and he never lived up to his prep potential. If he wants it, he could be a ten-year pro at a high level,
CFN Projection: Fifth Round

20. Brandon Deadrick, Alabama 6-4, 296 (DE)
The question is where he’s going to play. More of a big end than a tackle, he’s really tall and big, really long, and he’s strong on the inside. He’ll have to be a 3-4 end, but he could see time anywhere up front if and when he needs to move around, but there’s a limit on what he can do. He’s not going to flash into the backfield and isn’t going to get to the quarterback, and there are character issues after a variety of off-the-field issues.
CFN Projection: Fourth Round

21. Kade Weston, Georgia 6-5, 317
Tall and with good size, he’s an interesting prospect with the right look and the strength to hold his own on an NFL line. While he’s not a space-eater, he can grow into a terrific backup nose tackle and could be strong against the run for a limited time. He’s not an athlete and he didn’t do all that much with his Georgia career. It’ll take the right coach to unleash his potential, and the hope will be that he’s a diamond in the rough.
CFN Projection: Sixth Round

22. Jimmy Saddler-McQueen, Texas A&M-Kingsville 6-3, 299
Because of his combination of quickness and size he’s a raw, raw, RAW prospect who might be worth a long look. He’s willing to work on being better and he’s always going 100 miles per hour, but he needs serious coaching and will be erased by any blocker with any talent. However, if he gets a lot stronger and is allowed time (like a season or two) to work on becoming a real, live football player, he could be a steal late in the draft.
CFN Projection: Sixth Round

23. Vince Oghobaase, Duke 6-5, 303
A tremendous recruit for Duke, he was good, but he wasn’t as dominant as originally hoped for. The size is there and he could be a space-eater with a little more time in the weight room, but he’s not developed enough as a player or in his body and he had several dings throughout his career. There’s tread on the tires and he might have a short shelf life. Worse yet, he doesn’t do any one thing at a high NFL level.
CFN Projection: Sixth Round

24. Jay Ross, East Carolina 6-3, 313
A big body with the quickness to hope he can be used in a variety of ways, he has the tools. He’s strong, can blow through gaps, and is slippery for a player of his bulk. Not always consistent, he’s sloppy in his technique and doesn’t play up to his skills. For a player who is so strong and so quick, he was pushed around way too much at a Conference USA level.
CFN Projection: Sixth Round

25. Al Woods, LSU 6-4, 309
If you didn’t see film on him and only went by looks and measurables, he’d be the prototype. It’s all there with phenomenal athleticism for a player of his size, rocking the Combine with a tackle-best 37” vertical, and there isn’t a lot of tread on the tires. However, there’s a reason. He didn’t play nearly as well as his skills and, to put it in the most basic terms, he isn’t a good football player. He’ll be overdrafted because of his million-dollar tools and he’ll drive a coaching staff crazy when he’s not better than he looks.
CFN Projection: Third Round

26. Boo Robinson, Wake Forest
27. Doug Worthington, Ohio State (DE)
28. Mick Williams, Pitt
29. Travis Ivey, Maryland
30. Demarcus Granger, Oklahoma
31. Jeron Baston, Missouri
32. Abe Koroma, Western Illinois
33. Ekon Udofia, Stanford
34. Charles Alexander, LSU
35. Alan-Michael Cash, NC State