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2010 NFL Draft - 2nd Round Talents
California RB Jahvid Best
California RB Jahvid Best
CollegeFootballNews.com
Posted Apr 20, 2010


From the college football perspective, here's CFN's 2010 pre-draft ranking of the players with second round talent.

2010 NFL Draft Position Rankings

Second Round Talents


By Pete Fiutak

2010 CFN Talent Rankings
- 11st Rounders
- 2nd Rounders
- 3rd Rounders
- 4th Rounders
- 5th Rounders
- 66th Rounders
- 7th Rounders 
- Top Free Agent Talents 

2010 CFN Position Rankings & Analysis

- QBs | RBs | WRs | TEs
- Cs | OTs | OGs | DEs
- DTs | ILBs | OLBs
- Ss | CBs

2010 NFL Combine Quick Looks & Post-Combine Rankings

- QBs | RBs | WRs | TEs
- Cs | OTs | OGs | DEs
- DTs | ILBs | OLBs
- Ss | CBs

2010 NFL Combine Results
- QBs | RBs | WRs | TEs
- Cs | OTs | OGs | DEs
- DTs | ILBs | OLBs
- Ss | CBs 

2010 NFL Combine
- Offensive Winners  
- Offensive Losers 
- Defensive Winners 
- Defensive Losers

33. Brian Price, DT UCLA 6-1, 303
While he's not all that big and he's a short, squatty defender, he's extremely quick and is one of the strongest tackles in the draft. He's always working, always working, and always making plays as both an interior pass rusher and a tough rock against the run. Athletic for his size, he should be a great interior pass rusher at the next level. He needs to get into better overall shape and he needs to show that he wants to run through a wall when it comes to the little things it'll take to get better, but his versatility and his disruptiveness will work well in just about any defense.
CFN Projection: Second Round

34. Jahvid Best, RB California 5-10, 199
It all depends on how he's used. As a bolt of lightning with 4.36 speed, offensive coordinators drool over players this fast with his explosiveness and his nose for the goal line. A natural runner, he's instinctive, always seems to see the hole a half step in advance, and can't be stopped in open space. The down side is his size and his durability. There's no way he'll last for a full season and he has to be limited to just 15 touches a game, if that. Not strong in any way, he's a pure space runner and won't go through the inside at all without being erased. With his lack of strength and bulk, there's no blocking ability whatsoever. He's a top 15 talent who'll end up going later and being a nice pick for someone who'll be very, very happy and the possibilities.
CFN Projection: Second Round

35. Jared Odrick, DT Penn State 6-5, 304
While there was an off-the-field incident and there are going to be some question marks about his character and his maturity, he's fine. There's no knucklehead factor here. He's strong and athletic with the quickness to close a hole in a heartbeat. An anchor and a leader, he's the type of lineman that other players work around. He's a bit thin for his size and will likely get pushed around a wee bit at the next level, but he can be used just about anywhere on the line and he'll produce.
CFN Projection: First Round

36. Montario Hardesty, RB Tennessee 6-0, 225
With good size, solid speed, and excellent production, he should be one of the best all-around packages of any of the running backs. While he's not nearly as flashy as a Jahvid Best or a C.J. Spiller, he has the potential to be more useful with the inside running ability that those two speed backs don't have and has decent power. On the down side, he'll have a short shelf life and will take a lot of big shots, and he has had problems staying healthy throughout his career. He's not going to be a sexy pick, but he'll produce and could be a nice piece of someone's running back puzzle.
CFN Projection: Third Round

37. Brandon Spikes, ILB Florida 6-3, 249
A better football player than a raw prospect, he's not sideline-to-sideline fast at an NFL level and he's not nearly polished enough for all the experience, but he's a great leader, always finds his way to the ball, and he's always going full-tilt. While he might not be an elite athlete, he always stood out on a defense full of great athletes. He's only an inside/middle linebacker because of his lack of top-end speed, and he has to hit the weights to be able to hold up and be physical enough, but he'll be a good value any time after the first round.
CFN Projection: Second Round

38. Colt McCoy, QB Texas 6-1, 216
It's all going to be about what's asked of him. If he's going to be expected to bomb away, he's going to struggle. If it'll be his job to play in a West Coast attack where he's able to dink and dunk with short-to-midrange timing passes, he could be special. No, he's not Joe Montana, but he has similar size and mobility and can be used in the same sort of way. He throws great on the move, is tough-as-nails when he has to take a shot, and most of all, he has impeccable character and is the type of leader the rest of the team will follow into the fire and the coaching staff will love to have on the field. On the down side, he's not all that big, doesn't have a live arm, and he has a ton of wear on the tires after getting beaten up over the last four years. He'll need some time and some work in a pure pro-style offense, but he's a quick study. There might not be a high ceiling, but there's almost no downside. At the very least he could be a good backup who hangs around the league for more than a decade.
CFN Projection: Second Round

39. Rob Gronkowski, TE Arizona 6-6, 264 (Jr.)
Very big and very talented with the total package of talents, he can run better than his 4.75 40 would show, has phenomenal hands, and is tough enough to grow into a better blocker. If he can stay healthy he has the potential to be the top tight end in this draft and one of the most productive in a decade, but he can't be counted on to last more than ten minutes. He missed time with mono, missed most of last year with a herniated disk, and he has never been able to show he can play for a full season. The experience isn't there, but the upside is limitless.
CFN Projection: Second Round

40. Donald Butler, ILB Washington 6-1, 245
Now this is an NFL inside linebacker. Out of all the prospects who try to fit several types for different roles, Butler has the prototype tools. He's big, ripped, and threw around 35 reps of 225 pounds at the Combine and looked every bit the part. While he's far stronger in the weight room than he plays on the field, he moves well, is decent in pass coverage, and has a great motor. And yes, while he's an inside linebacker, he could play outside in a 4-3 and be just fine.
CFN Projection: Third Round

41. Arrelious Benn, WR Illinois 6-1, 219 (Jr.)
Considering he was considered to be one of the top receiver recruits of the last five years, he was a major disappointment. He's a terrific athlete, has the right attitude, has the size, and has the make-up to become a talent, but he didn't get it done in college and didn't produce nearly enough. He wasn't bad, but he's almost certainly going to be a far better pro than a collegian once he gets in a more sophisticated system that can use his talents better. Extremely strong, he's tough for most corners to handle and isn't afraid to come up with the big block. Extremely quick, he can be used as a return man. While he still needs polish and isn't the most natural of receivers, he should flourish with better coaching.
CFN Projection: Second Round

42. Terrence Cody, DT Alabama 6-5, 354
You know exactly what you're getting. Cody isn't going to touch a quarterback, he's going to have weight problems and will have a ton of bad fat that won't go away, but he'll also sit in the middle of a line and won't move. He's the textbook definition of an anchor with surprising lateral quickness for a player of his size. While he's not a three-down lineman and he isn't known for being the hardest worker around, if you want a pure run stuffer, he might be the best in the draft if he can keep his weight around 350.
CFN Projection: Third Round

43. Everson Griffen, DE USC 6-3, 273
A slight disappointment, he was always good, but he wasn't an elite performer. The strength and size are there, running an excellent 4.66 40 and lifting 32 reps of 225 pounds, but his raw skills have never been a question mark. Now he needs to get his butt in gear and play up to his talent on a regular basis. There will be moments when he's special, and then he'll disappear for long stretches. Someone will fall in love with him on the workouts alone, but it'll take a great coach to get the best out of him.
CFN Projection: Second Round

44. Reshad Jones, S Georgia 6-1, 214
Overshadowed by the star power among the top of the safety pole, Jones doesn't take a backseat to anyone. He's the best pure strong safety in the draft with great range, defensive lineman strength (with 24 reps on the bench), and great all-around athleticism. While he's not a blazer, he's fast enough to fit in any system and he's one of the biggest hitters in the draft. He's not all that thickly built and he misses a few too many plays by trying to make the special stop when the routine would do. There are several questions and concerns about his consistency, but there's a chance he could be among the most special players in the draft if he can put it all together.
CFN Projection: Second Round

45. Nate Allen, FS South Florida 6-0, 207
There's no questioning his quickness on the field and his athleticism, and he's fluid for a player of his size, but he needs to get functionally stronger and has to commit himself to the weight room, and he has to become more of a playmaker. He's not an intimidating force in any way and could end up being better as a nickel or dime defender if he doesn't eventually move to corner. He's smart enough to play any spot in the secondary and roll from Day One.
CFN Projection: Second Round

46. Lamarr Houston, DT Texas 6-3, 305
An interesting player with an interesting career, he was a 100-meter sprinter in high school and has kept much of his athleticism after bulking up to over 300 pounds. He's a great worker who's always going full-tilt and he can play anywhere in any scheme. The down side is his résumé, which was fine, but nothing amazing from a decent Texas career. Not as slippery and not as creative a pass rusher as he needs to be, once he's blocked he stays blocked. He'll be at his best playing as a one-gap playmaker whose job is get into the backfield and provide pressure.
CFN Projection: Third Round

47. Devin McCourty, CB Rutgers 5-11, 193
Very athletic and very quick, he didn't fly at the Combine, but he came up with a 4.48 and later ran a 4.42. He has the combination of skills and he looks the part, but despite his strength he'll get pushed around a bit. He seems like he should be doing far, far more considering his talent; he wasn't a difference maker. He'll likely be a better pro than a collegian and will start for a long, long time and be rock solid. There's almost no bust potential.
CFN Projection: Second Round

48. Cam Thomas, DT North Carolina 6-4, 330
One of the best pure defensive tackles in the draft, he's not going to fly into the backfield but he'll be a brick wall against the run. After a great Combine with 31 reps and showing off the pure bulk everyone wants in the middle of the line, his stock quickly rose. Unlike Terrence Cody, Thomas is really big but without a ton of bad weight; he's just strong. While he had a good Tar Heel career, he didn't have a great one and struggled to shake some ankle problems. His biggest problem is he slow motor and a lax attitude that'll turn off more than a few teams; he'll need a coach to do some butt-kicking on a regular basis.
CFN Projection: Third Round

49. Carlton Mitchell, WR South Florida 6-3, 215, (Jr.)
It's all there and he's a chance worth taking. With 6-3 size, 4.49 speed, and the home run hitting ability to become a matchup nightmare, he's a tremendous athlete with the best raw skills of any receiver in the draft. While he looks a bit too much like a track guy playing football, and he needs to do far more to use his size to take advantage of smaller corners, the upside is limitless if he's given a year to work on his technique and given a free pass until he gets the right coaching. Someone out there is going to make him a priority and a key to the draft.
CFN Projection: Third Round

50. Ricky Sapp, OLB Clemson 6-4, 252 (DE)
Originally considered a possible defensive end, he proved at the Combine that he's a linebacker … maybe. A tweener with tremendous upside, he has the tools to be used in a variety of ways as a pro including a pass rushing specialist (he was a superstar high school sprinter). He's not a run defender and he needs to get bigger, but he moves well, is athletic, and can be the type of player who blows up on a defense with other good players who'll do the dirty work. He might not be the best all-around defender, but he could be a Pro Bowler on sack total.
CFN Projection: Second Round

51. Eric Norwood, OLB South Carolina 6-1, 245 (DE)
Part defensive end, part linebacker, he got many of his accolades based on a few big, high-profile games and disappeared far too often the rest of the time. He has good size, excellent strength, and could be turned loose as a pass rushing terror from time to time, and he could even be used as a middle linebacker if needed. While he might have gotten by on reputation, he's a good player who'll likely flourish as a pro if he gets to be a speed-rushing linebacker.
CFN Projection: Second Round

52. Navorro Bowman, OLB Penn State 6-0, 242
He came out early after an interesting career with a ton of production on the field and several issues off of it. While he was ultra-athletic for the Nittany Lions as an all-star playmaker who hung with receivers without a problem and was great at getting into the backfield, he came up with a clunker of a Combine running a slow 4.72 (he was expected to be more explosive) which partly could've been because he came in heavy. A great tackler who could be deadly once he figures out how to play at a bigger weight, he'll be a strong pick as long as his days of off-field issues are over.
CFN Projection: Second Round

53. Damian Williams, WR USC 6-1, 197 (Jr.)
The former Arkansas Razorback transferred to USC and was fine, but his workouts have been average. In a strange way, considering he played with Mark Sanchez and was Matt Barkley's main target, he often made his quarterbacks look great by making something out of nothing. While he doesn't have blazing speed, he's quick on the field and does a great job of fighting for the ball. He might not be a star NFL No. 1 target, he has enough talent to grow into a devastating No. 2. He'll be a big yards after catch target.
CFN Projection: Second Round

54. Charles Brown, OT USC 6-5, 303
He had a rough Combine, didn't move all that well, and he only came up with 21 reps on the bench. But he measured well, is big with a nice frame, and he looks better on film than he does in workouts. He uses his size extremely well and does a great job of getting on the move and making blocks down the field. While he's great at dominating smallish defenders, he's not a mauler of a run blocker and needs to get stronger. There's good upside, but he'll only be right for certain teams and certain styles. Forget about him on a power team.
CFN Projection: Second Round

55. Dan LeFevour, QB Central Michigan 6-3, 230
A baller. Arguably the greatest player in MAC history did it all at the non-BCS level, played well against the better teams, and he looked the part in offseason workouts and practices against the big boys. One of the best all-around combinations of run-pass skills in the draft, he's great on the move and finds ways to make big things happen by getting the ball into the hands of his playmakers. You don't win as many big games and as many championships (three MAC titles) as he did without knowing what to do. While he doesn't have a cannon for an arm, he's accurate enough to get by and he's a great decision maker. The arm strength for his size is an issue and he spent most of his career in the shotgun, but if he gets a little time to work on speeding up his throwing motion, he has a chance to be a solid NFL starter. However, he'll need the right system; he's not the typical NFL quarterback prospect.
CFN Projection: Third Round

56. Ben Tate, RB Auburn 5-11, 220
All the pieces were there to be special, but he wasn't able to put it all together as he didn't quite fit into what Auburn did offensively. He looks the part of a prototype NFL back, has phenomenal 4.4 speed for a 220 pound runner, and he's not afraid to get physical. There's a great chance that he could be a far better pro than a collegian if only because he'll be used differently and can be more of a pure runner. While he's not a natural back and will more likely take a hit than he will find a hole to cut back through, the raw skills are there to be special if he gets to work behind a good line.
CFN Projection: Third Round

57. Brandon Ghee, CB Wake Forest 6-0, 192
Extremely quick, he had some great offseason workouts showing off tremendous raw skills running a 4.45 at the Combine and later a 4.38. He destroyed the short drills exploding around the cones and in the shuttle, while the 10"7" broad jump was among the best of the corners. It's all there skills-wise, and he proved to be coaches' favorite at the Senior Bowl and in interviews. He's not going to flatten anyone and he gets pushed around way too much, and he's a better prospect than a football player, but someone will fall in love with the measurables.
CFN Projection: Second Round

58. Carlos Dunlap, DE Florida 6-6, 277
On talent and skills he might be a top five talent. The epitome of the million-dollar-talent, ten-cent head cliché, he has the size and the explosive quickness to become a devastating NFL pass rusher, but can he get the engine revved up to play full-time? A ghost way too often on the field, and with some issues off of it (including a DUI), there's major bust potential. Not helping his cause were, according to several insiders, a poor showing in various interviews. However, he's a tremendous all-around talent with Pro Bowl skills, and there's a chance he could be far better in a pro setting than a college one. Of course, when it comes to having a fire lit under him, if Urban Meyer couldn't get it done …
CFN Projection: Second Round

59. Jerome Murphy, CB South Florida 6-0, 196
He has a very nice, very solid package of skills. Not a blazer, he's not going to be anyone's No. 1 corner and projects to be more of a nickel or dime defender, but he's a good football player who'll find a spot somewhere. While he got ripped up from time to time and he struggled a bit last year, he's big, physical, and there could be a big payoff if someone wants to wait for a year or so.
CFN Projection: Second Round

60. Jacoby Ford, WR Clemson 5-9, 186
4.24. Speed, speed, speed, speed, speed. He might not be big, he might have holes in his game as a pure receiver, and he might have major durability concerns, but there's no substitute for raw warp wheels. Not only does he go from 0-to-60 in a hiccup, but he can also blow past anyone when he gets the ball in his hands. He's never going to be a polished receiver and he'll never block anyone, but who cares? Does anyone complain that DeSean Jackson isn't physical? Make him a No. 3 target who has to make one big play a game, and he'll do it.
CFN Projection: Fourth Round

61. Jonathan Dwyer, RB Georgia Tech 5-11, 229 (Jr.)
Easily the call of the draft among the running backs. He's big, quick, and was phenomenal in the Paul Johnson option offensive system, but he was an utter disaster at the Combine compared to the other top backs running a glacier-slow 4.66 in the 40 and didn't do much better in the passing and agility drills. However, if he could drop a few pounds, he'll show he's a good runner who was great on tape even in the gimmick offense and he always showed up in the biggest games at the biggest times. He won't be for every offense, but if he's allowed to play on a team with a zone-blocking scheme, he has the potential to put up big numbers for a long stretch. There was a time when he was considered a top 15 overall pick, and now someone will consider him a steal as he drops down.
CFN Projection: Third Round

62. Toby Gerhart, RB Stanford 6-0, 231
It'll be interesting to see what his pitch count is. He might have about 1,000 touches in him before he grinds to a halt, but he could be extremely productive during his limited time. He has excellent speed for his size, is strong, and is coming off an ultra-productive career that finished off with an all-timer of a year that would've brought him the Heisman if he had played somewhere east of the Mississippi River. While there's little wiggle to his game, not much cutback ability, and he'll take a ton of big shots, he'll keep the pile moving, has better on-field game speed than he gets credit for, and he can be a workhorse.
CFN Projection: Second Round

63. Rennie Curran, OLB Georgia 5-11, 235
Not all that big and not all that strong against the bigger, tougher NFL blockers, but he's a terrific athlete who moved well at the Combine but ran a mere 4.72 40. Extremely strong, he might make up for his lack of height with pure strength. On the field, he was extremely underappreciated and overshadowed in the SEC and could become a star once he hits the NFL limelight. In the weird world of NFL scouting, if he was 6-1 he'd probably be a sure-thing top 50 pick, but because he's two inches shorter (like that really matters for a linebacker) he'll probably drop.
CFN Projection: Third Round

64. Perrish Cox, CB Oklahoma State 5-11, 195
A boom-or-bust as they come, he was an extremely productive collegian who was the playmaking key to the Cowboy defense, but he's also inconsistent. When the lights are on, he's fine, but he didn't step up and bring the A effort each and every week. With decent size and great return skills, he's versatile enough to hang around a roster for a while, but he'll only stay around and be a key player if he can get the motor running. He'll have a few bad plays, and then he'll come up with a big play to make up for the problems. Too slow to be a No. 1 corner, he'll have to be a cog in the secondary.
CFN Projection: Third Round

 










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