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2010 NFL Draft - 3rd Round Talents
Cincinnati WR Mardy Gilyard
Cincinnati WR Mardy Gilyard
CollegeFootballNews.com
Posted Apr 20, 2010


From the college football perspective, here's CFN's 2010 pre-draft ranking of the players with third round talent.

2010 NFL Draft Position Rankings

Third Round Talents


By Pete Fiutak

2010 CFN Talent Rankings
- 1st Rounders
- 2nd Rounders
- 3rd Rounders
- 4th Rounders
- 5th Rounders
- 6th Rounders
- 7th Rounders 
- Top Free Agent Talents 

2010 CFN Position Rankings & Analysis

- QBs | RBs | WRs | TEs
- Cs | OTs | OGs | DEs
- DTs | ILBs | OLBs
- Ss | CBs

2010 NFL Combine Quick Looks & Post-Combine Rankings

- QBs | RBs | WRs | TEs
- Cs | OTs | OGs | DEs
- DTs | ILBs | OLBs
- Ss | CBs

2010 NFL Combine Results
- QBs | RBs | WRs | TEs
- Cs | OTs | OGs | DEs
- DTs | ILBs | OLBs
- Ss | CBs 

2010 NFL Combine
- Offensive Winners  
- Offensive Losers 
- Defensive Winners 
- Defensive Losers

65. Chris Cook, CB Virginia 6-2, 212 (S)
Is he a safety or a corner? He has tremendous size and upped his stock big-time with a phenomenal Combine running a 4.46 and coming up with a corner-best 11’0” in the broad jump. On raw skills alone he’s one of the best prospects in the draft. He doesn’t shy away from contact, is versatile enough to be moved around anywhere, and he acts the part of a top-shelf defensive back. However, the athleticism doesn’t translate and he doesn’t play up to his talent, and he’ll likely end up playing more safety if he can be more physical, but on size and quickness he’s a special prospect who someone will be really excited about drafting.
CFN Projection: Third Round

66. Kareem Jackson, CB Alabama 5-10, 196
A solid all-around corner who doesn’t have special skills or elite talent, he’s a tail-busting worker who always rose to the big occasion. Ultra-reliable, he was an excellent cog in the system who always did the little things asked of him. However, he wasn’t a top high school prospect for a reason. He’s not the greatest of athletes, especially at an NFL corner level, and he gambles a bit too much. Surrounded by great players in a strong scheme, he flourished. Put him on an island in the NFL and it’s uh-oh time.
CFN Projection: Third Round

67. Tim Tebow, QB Florida 6-3, 236
Tebow could be the call of the draft as opinions fluctuate wildly on what he can and can’t do and what he can and can’t become. A peerless leader with all the intangibles, every coaching staff will love him. However, he’s not for everyone and his rah-rah, let’s-go! style, along with his open preaching and showing of faith, will wear thin immediately if he tries to be Joe College when surrounded by grown men at the highest level (this was an issue for some at the NFL Combine). What made him so great, besides the leadership, was his running ability, which doesn’t translate in any way, shape, or form for the NFL; he’s not going to run over any NFL linebackers. Of course, the biggest issue is his throwing motion that he has had to break down and create from scratch over a few short weeks. However, he never received enough credit for being one of the most accurate, efficient passers in recent college football history, and if you go back and watch the 2008 SEC Championship game against Alabama, he was throwing darts to covered receivers (unlike, for example, Sam Bradford, who almost always threw to a wide open target). He’ll never be Peyton Manning as a passer, but if he’s allowed to be Tim Tebow as a short-to-midrange thrower out of the shotgun, he can succeed and thrive. He might turn out to be the ideal backup.
CFN Projection: Second Round

68. Barry Church, SS Toledo 6-1, 222
Shhhhhh. He has flown under the radar playing for Toledo, but he has been a major playmaker from the start of his career. While his measureables were hit or miss at the Combine (looking phenomenal in the short drills bit ran a slow 4.69 40), he played faster on the field looking bigger, stronger, and better than anyone he was going against. However, he doesn’t have top shelf NFL skills and could be limited in what he’ll be able to do. He’s not a cover-2 safety and will have his most value closer to the line.
CFN Projection: Fourth Round

69. Bruce Campbell, OT Maryland 6-6, 314
He came up with one of the greatest workouts in Combine history blazing a 4.84 40 and 34 reps on the bench. He looked cut, showed off the body of a tight end, and moved like a much smaller player. The athleticism is unquestioned, but he needs a ton of work at becoming a football player. Not being able to block is usually an issue for an NFL tackle, and he doesn’t use his strength of athleticism nearly enough. Someone will fall in love with the idea of his athleticism and will take the chance on getting a special talent, but it’s buyer beware.
CFN Projection: First Round

70. Brandon LaFell, WR LSU 6-3, 211
There was a time when many scouts considered him a top 15 overall prospect with the size and the potential to be special. However, he timed poorly, running a 4.63, and he didn’t play at a special, elite level in college. There’s a chance, though, that he could become a far better pro than a collegian with good moves for a player of his size and excellent blocking skills. The lack of deep speed will be a problem and he’s not the most consistent of pass catchers, but if he can show a good attitude and is willing to work (neither is a given), he could become one of the most productive receivers in this draft. He has to want to be special.
CFN Projection: Third Round

71. T.J. Ward, SS Oregon 5-10, 211
While not tall, he’s a thick, tough defender who’ll throw his body all over the place. The walk-on plays like he has something to prove on every snap. Always around the ball, he’s great when the ball is in the air and he isn’t afraid to get as physical as he needs to be. Holding up at an NFL level against the run will be a problem after suffering two bad knee injuries and has always played dinged up. A good athlete, he’s not a great one and will be limited. He might not have a long shelf life, but he’ll be ultra-productive during his time.
CFN Projection: Third Round

72. Aaron Hernandez, TE Florida 6-2, 245 (Jr.)
He’s built like a fullback, moves like an H-Back, and catches like a wide receiver. He’s not all that big and doesn’t have the prototype look, but he’s a phenomenal route runner and a great pass catcher with excellent athleticism and the ability to make the tough catches. While he might be thickly built, he’s not a blocker and has some character issues after having a few minor problems at Florida. You know what you’re getting; he’ll be a strong receiver who’ll need a better blocking tight end to be in the rotation.
CFN Projection: Second Round

73. Mardy Gilyard, WR Cincinnati 6-0, 187
Considering his lack of size, he needed to time well and work out better, but that was a problem at the Combine running a 4.61. However, he showed excellent quickness and will be one of the more intriguing players on many draft boards. He has the attitude of a No. 1 receiver and isn’t afraid to step up and produce when everything is on the line. Smart, savvy, and willing to work harder than everyone else, he’ll make a coaching staff happy. The slight frame is going to be a problem, but his lack of deep speed will put a ceiling on what he can become. He’ll play better than he worked out.
CFN Projection: Third Round

74. Vladimir Ducasse, OG Massachusetts 6-5, 332 (OT)
Is he a tackle or a guard? A tremendous raw prospect, he has the prototype size and the quickness to become a star at tackle in time, he played his entire college career on the outside, but he’s not even close technique-wise. At the moment, he’s not an NFL tackle by any stretch. The raw tools are there and with the right coach he could be a perennial Pro Bowler, but with his girth and his power, he’s a guard right now. He’ll likely be drafted within the first 50 picks and could start tomorrow inside or in a few years outside.
CFN Projection: Second Round

75. Rodger Saffold, OT Indiana 6-5, 316
A nice athlete who did a fantastic job in workouts and at the Combine. He was quick, smooth, and athletic enough to prove he could be a rock-solid left tackle with great balance and good body control. Very productive and good against the better Big Ten pass rushers, he has the film to back up his workouts. The one problem is his meanness. He’s a good blocker, but he’s not going to throw a defender up into the fifth row. While he worked out well as a tackle prospect, he’ll probably spend the second half of his career at guard.
CFN Projection: Second Round

76. Selvish Capers, OT West Virginia 6-5, 308
A terrific athlete was has good explosion in his legs, he now needs to get stronger and prove to be a better run blocker. He’s great for a zone-blocking scheme, but he only came up with 19 reps on the bench and he has to hit a weight room to fill out his tall, skinny frame. A former tight end, he moves well and could be just scratching the surface of how good he’ll become. Compared to a few of the other athletic tackle prospects, he should be a cheaper, safer pick outside of the top 50.
CFN Projection: Second Round

77. Dezmon Briscoe, WR Kansas 6-2, 207 (Jr.)
This is why the personnel directors get the big money. Briscoe could be a star in the right system with the right coaches and with the right support system around him, but he could also be a mega-flake who quietly busts out of the league in a hurry. With great size and the ability to use it, he’ll muscle his way for the ball between double teams, and despite his lumbering 4.61 40, he finds ways to get open. The knucklehead factor can’t be ignored and could end up being his downfall if he doesn’t produce right away. If he’s not great in camp and if he can prove to be matured, a coaching staff will have no interest in waiting him out.
CFN Projection: Fourth Round

78. LeGarrette Blount, RB Oregon 6-1, 241
A fantastic power back who’ll rack up huge scoring stats as a goal line specialist, the 241-pounder cuts well, hits like a ton of bricks, and he can’t be brought down by one defender. Of course, there will always be The Punch that will linger over his career, but that might have been the best thing he could’ve done since he was able to show the character that many thought he didn’t have. You know exactly what you’re getting. He’s a big, strong back who can finish off drives with scores and can be a sledgehammer who can grind out the clock.
CFN Projection: Fourth Round

79. Dekoda Watson, OLB Florida State 6-1, 240
Absolutely chiseled out of granite, he has a body with one muscle on top of another. More than just a phenomenal physique, he’s extremely quick and cranked out a blazing 4.56 40 and an amazing 11’2” broad jump. He’s not going to get any bigger (there isn’t room for another muscle), he doesn’t have a feel for pass coverage considering his athleticism, and has been better in workouts than on the field.
CFN Projection: Third Round

80. Demaryius Thomas, WR Georgia Tech 6-3, 224
It all depends on how quickly he can show he can run a full route tree. A one-trick pony, he was the only receiver who did anything for the Georgia Tech passing game over the last few seasons, and that one thing was to get deep and use his size and strength to make big plays. When he had to run the short routes or the consistent catch, forget about it. He drops way too many passes and seems to go out of his way to fight the ball, but his bigger problem could be dealing with a corner who isn’t lulled to sleep. He was fantastic when defenses were sucked in by the Tech running game, but he’ll have to prove he won’t be erased by NFL corners. Is he faster than his projected time? He broke his foot and is still recovering, but once he’s right, he’ll have all the raw physical skills. Now he’ll have to show he can be a receiver.
CFN Projection: Second Round

81. Jason Worilds, OLB Virginia Tech 6-1, 254 (DE)
Part defensive end, part outside linebacker, he’s a true tweener with a high motor who can do a little of everything, he was quick through the short drills in workouts. A tough tackler who has to be dragged off the field, he has had several injuries to play through but isn’t going to dog it. While he’ll need to be a more creative pass rusher and will have to grow into a role as a 3-4 linebacker.
CFN Projection: Third Round

82. Anthony Dixon, RB Mississippi State 6-1, 233
While he’s not fast, has character and concentration issues, and isn’t the type of person or player who can be counted on to carry a pro running game, but he did his best to put the MSU offense on his back. He was all the team had offensively and he still produced at a high SEC level over his entire career. While he doesn’t time fast, he runs quickly for a player of his size and is always gaining positive yards. The problem is that he doesn’t quite have elite NFL rushing ability and doesn’t do any one thing at a top pro level. With his all-around game, though, he could be the type of player who gets taken in the middle of the draft and ends up having a far better career than a few of the high-priced first rounders.
CFN Projection: Third Round

83. Kyle Calloway, OT Iowa 6-7, 323
He’s really big, is tough to get knock off his base, and has great length making him tough to get around. However, he has the dreaded Right Tackle Only tag. He’s one of the slowest offensive linemen who’ll get drafted and doesn’t have the raw skills to cover a quarterback’s blind side, but he has a great attitude, is experienced, and he should be able to step in and play from Day One.
CFN Projection: Third Round

84. James Starks, RB Buffalo 6-2, 218
Sort of the underground, grass roots sleeper going into the beginning of last year, he suffered a shoulder injury during the summer and was knocked out for the year. He’s a big back who takes too many shots and will wear down too easily, but he’s a great finisher, is slippery, and has the hands to be used on all three downs and in any situation. For good and bad, he takes shots and will get banged around. He’ll stick on a roster because he’ll look great in camp, but he’s not durable enough to get a full workload. But if he can stay healthy, he could be a steal.
CFN Projection: Sixth Rounder

85. Darrell Stuckey, SS Kansas 5-11, 205
With decent size and terrific speed, he has the upside to be a great value pick. The sub-4.5 speed makes him a candidate for any safety spot and a near-perfect fit for the cover-2. He’s not known for being physical and he isn’t a strong hitter, but his range and athleticism should be enough to hold down a job for a long time. With his work ethic and his toughness, he’ll make himself into a better player, but he isn’t going to get much bigger and he doesn’t have top end range. His stock was far higher last year than it was after a mediocre 2009, but he could be a great selection in the middle rounds.
CFN Projection: Fourth Round

86. Garrett Graham, TE Wisconsin 6-3, 243
While he’s a bit thin and he’s not all that big a blocker, he’s a great receiver with savvy route running ability and the talent to find the seam and make the tough grabs. There were times when he was the only viable target in the Badger passing game, everyone knew it, and he still produced. He needs to be stronger, is only around a 4.75 runner, and he’ll be limited in what he can do, but he can be like another Wisconsin product, Owen Daniels, and can be a cheap draft pick who’ll hang around for a long time.
CFN Projection: Fourth Round

87. John Jerry, OG Ole Miss 6-5, 328
He made himself a lot of money at the Combine by showing up in shape and looking quick enough to be used at tackle if needed. He’s a bruising, physical blocker who’s great for the running game and has a nasty way of pushing linemen into the fifth row. His weight is going to constantly be an issue and he might need a coach to keep on him about it. There’s nothing fancy about him. See lineman, hit lineman.
CFN Projection: Third Round

88. Geno Atkins, DT Georgia 6-1, 293
While he’s a little bit light and he doesn’t have any room to get bigger, he’s extremely strong, extremely quick, and has tremendous upside for the right defense. He won’t be for everyone, he can’t play on the nose and will likely flourish as a 3-4 end, but after a Combine with 34 reps on the bench and an eye-popping 4.75 40, someone will be extremely happy to get him and turn him loose. Now he needs to play up to his talent and potential and has to show that he wants to be a real, live player after getting benched for a stretch last year.
CFN Projection: Third Round

89. Dexter McCluster, RB Ole Miss 5-9, 172
What are you going to do with him? He’s not an NFL running back, and was kept in a box at Ole Miss until he was needed (the coaching staff didn’t want him to get hurt), he has the potential to be an NFL receiver, he has the hands for it, but he’s not particularly fast (running a slow 4.53), he’s way too small to take any sort of a pounding, and he’ll be limited in what he can do outside of a specialist role; he’s only going to work if he can have plays designed just for him. However, he’s extremely quick on the field, did everything fine at the Combine other than run the 40, and he can be used as a returner and will be seen as a jack-of-all-trades. It would be nice if he was faster, though.
CFN Projection: Third Round

90. Alex Carrington, DE Arkansas State 6-5, 285
Very tall, very long, and very hard working, he’s a silky-smooth 285-pounder with the strength to match his quickness. Able to play either end position, he’s cut, tough, and can get off the ball in a hurry. He’ll need to learn to play up to his tools a bit better and he needs to put together a better group of pass rushing moves to count on, but he was more than great in offseason workouts and should be a rock-solid long time pro. There isn’t a high ceiling, but there’s little bust potential.
CFN Projection: Third Round

91. D’Anthony Smith, DT Louisiana Tech 6-2, 304
A big body with good all-around skills, he’ll come cheap compared to several other tackle prospects and he’ll be a great value. He’s quick into the backfield and can be used either as a 3-4 end or a 4-3 tackle and be just as effective. While he got by because he was bigger and more athletic than everyone else, he’s not going to be able to overpower anyone at the next level and he’s not functionally strong enough to hold up too well against NFL double teams. Can he show the motor and want-to needed to be great? If he kicks it in, there’s excellent upside.
CFN Projection: Third Round

92. Amari Spievey, CB Iowa 5-11, 195
A baller, Spievey overcame health problems and other issues which led to academic troubles and an interruption in his Hawkeye career to become a good, sound defender. He’s a hard worker who does what he can to improve, but there might be a hard ceiling on what he can do. His positives are on the film and not in a workout (even though he had a decent Combine), and it’s going to take a coach and a scout to do their homework to realize what kind of a player he should be. There’s a chance he could grow into a whale of a safety where he can roam and hit rather than deal with the speedier receivers.
CFN Projection: Third Round

93. Greg Hardy, DE Ole Miss 6-4, 281
One of the bigger boom-or-bust prospects among the defenders, he plays fast on the field, even if he timed poorly in offseason workouts, and is a top-shelf, athletic closer when he gets a beat on a quarterback. As a pure pass rusher, he might be the best in the draft and if you’re asking for one or two big plays a game, he should be able to provide them. However, he’s always dinged up, extremely flaky, and he gets erased against the run way too easily. If he’s not asked to do too much and if a team isn’t counting on him for a full season, he could be a game-changer a few times a year.
CFN Projection: Third Round

94. Corey Wootton, DE Northwestern 6-6, 270
With outstanding size, great length, and a fantastic physique, he’s an intimidating force with the quickness to match the measurables. There’s still a sense of unfinished business on what he can become as he was just coming into his own before suffering a devastating knee injury, and he wasn’t quite back to his old self last year. Very candid that he didn’t work nearly hard enough early in his career, he has the fire and the fight to reach his potential. Can he get back the quickness and explosiveness? Someone will have to take a chance on him without fully knowing what he’ll be a few years from now.
CFN Projection: Third Round

95. Joe McKnight, RB USC 5-11, 198 (Jr.)
While he ran well and worked out strong at the Combine, it wasn’t enough to make up for the disappointing career. He was tagged with being the next Reggie Bush, but instead he was just a guy who had some decent moments. The quickness and speed are there to make a difference at the next level, but he’s not strong, has no power whatsoever, and doesn’t block. He’ll have to be a specialist who finds a niche early on, and while he might have a good game or two here and there, he’s going to be along for the ride.
CFN Projection: Third Round

96. Syd’Quan Thompson, CB California 5-9, 186
An interesting prospect who doesn’t play like his frame, he’s a strong hitter for a 5-9, 186-pounder and he’s faster on the field than his 4.55 40 time. He’s a short, squatty defender with great quickness and can cut on a dime, and considering he isn’t afraid to hit, he could become a dangerous safety. The raw measureables aren’t there, but he can play and could be a very nice starter on the right defense. There’s a ceiling on what he can do and what he can become, but he’ll hang around the league for a long time.
CFN Projection: Fourth Round

97. J.D. Walton, C Baylor 6-3, 300
A good athlete for his size, he moves well and gets up and engaged in a hurry. A standout in Senior Bowl workouts, he more than showed he can handle himself at a high level and can be an NFL starter. However, he doesn’t have special skills like Maurkice Pouncey, needs to work on his technique (he’s too straight up and has to get lower), and isn’t going to flatten anyone.
CFN Projection: Fourth Round

98. Kyle McCarthy, SS Notre Dame 6-0, 205
A terrific playmaker, the question was whether or not he could flash the raw skills to match his on-field production. He did with a good 4.61 40 and with the easy and fluid way he worked around the short drills; he was among the best of all the defensive backs. The 24 reps on the bench did that much more to help him overcome the concerns over his lack of height and bulk. A high-character player, he’s as dependable as they come, but he’s way too small and isn’t nearly physical enough. He won’t likely start, but he’ll be a nice reserve who can do a little of everything.
CFN Projection: Fifth Round