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2010 NFL Draft - 4th Round Talents
Georgia Tech S Morgan Burnett
Georgia Tech S Morgan Burnett
CollegeFootballNews.com
Posted Apr 20, 2010


From the college football perspective, here's CFN's 2010 pre-draft ranking of the players with fourth round talent.

2010 NFL Draft Position Rankings

Fourth Round Talents


By Pete Fiutak

2010 CFN Talent Rankings
- 1st Rounders
- 2nd Rounders
- 3rd Rounders
- 4th Rounders
- 5th Rounders
- 6th Rounders
- 7th Rounders 
- Top Free Agent Talents 

2010 CFN Position Rankings & Analysis

- QBs | RBs | WRs | TEs
- Cs | OTs | OGs | DEs
- DTs | ILBs | OLBs
- Ss | CBs

2010 NFL Combine Quick Looks & Post-Combine Rankings

- QBs | RBs | WRs | TEs
- Cs | OTs | OGs | DEs
- DTs | ILBs | OLBs
- Ss | CBs

2010 NFL Combine Results
- QBs | RBs | WRs | TEs
- Cs | OTs | OGs | DEs
- DTs | ILBs | OLBs
- Ss | CBs 

2010 NFL Combine
- Offensive Winners  
- Offensive Losers 
- Defensive Winners 
- Defensive Losers

99. Chad Jones, SS LSU 6-2, 221
His biggest problem? He’s too good … at baseball. The big-hitting strong safety is a special outfielder and could even be looked at as a good reliever prospect, but he’s just as good a football player. Is he into baseball more? That’s going to be the issue for any NFL team wanting to use a draft pick on him, and there will need to be plenty of homework done to find out his true intentions. He’s not nearly strong enough with a miserable nine reps on the bench at the Combine, but he played a lot bigger on the football field as a game-changer who always seemed to come up with the big plays. However, he’s not physical enough play in and play out and wasn’t nearly consistent enough. It’ll be a buyer-beware draft pick since he’s really a baseball player giving football a look.
CFN Projection: Fourth Round

100. Tony Pike, QB Cincinnati 6-6, 223
The potential is there to grow into an Matt Schaub-like starter. He has excellent size, an accurate arm, and he’s a great decision maker. Tough as nails, he’ll play through injuries when he’s able to, but that’s part of the problem; he was always hurt. While he has a live arm, he doesn’t have a powerful one and isn’t going to make too many plays because of his gun. He’ll get knocked for his size, but he’s roughly the same size as Sam Bradford and is the same sort of player who could be had much, much cheaper. Like Bradford, Pike threw to open receivers as part of a great system and he has to prove he can hold up after getting beaten up. There are big concerns and question marks, but he could grow into a nice NFL starter.
CFN Projection: Third Round

101. Jamar Chaney, ILB Mississippi State 6-1, 242
A big, hard inside presence with great size and bulk to hold up just fine as a tough run stuffer, Chaney is built for the middle but can turn and move easily in pass coverage. While he wasn’t always known for being a top athlete, he made eyes pop at the Combine with a blazing 4.54, a 39” vertical, and fluid quickness around the cones and the shuttle. Along with the size and the raw skills, he’s a butt-buster who’s always working and always trying to get better. With all his talent, though, he didn’t do quite enough against the run that he probably should’ve and is just okay against the pass. Someone will like him on pure potential more than game tape.
CFN Projection: Third Round

102. Kevin Thomas, CB USC 6-0, 192
He’ll be overdrafted after his Combine. Everyone expected him to be a great athlete, but the 4.46 and the speed and fluidity through the short drills made him a standout. All the basic NFL tools are there with good size, great strength, and excellent speed, and there are enough big positives to overcome many of the little things … like his ability to play football. Durability has been a major problem, he’s not a form hitter, and he seems to have little to no football instincts. He was only a starter for one year and he didn’t do enough when given the chance, but he could be a far better pro in the right scheme.
CFN Projection: Third Round

103. Morgan Burnett, SS Georgia Tech 5-10, 211
He’ll change games for good and bad. While he’ll make the brilliant play just often enough to get everyone excited, he’ll then be out of the mix the next two plays and will disappear. He makes way too many mistakes by being overaggressive and takes way too many chances. However, he’s strong, big, and he doesn’t miss a tackle when he has the chance. There’s enough upside to get excited about the possibilities, but he doesn’t have elite raw skills and will have to be coached up in a big way to limit his freelancing errors.
CFN Projection: Fourth Round

104. Arthur Jones, DT Syracuse 6-3, 301
The only positive on a bad Syracuse defensive front, he was often a one-man gang as an underappreciated star on a struggling team. Strong and great against the run, he’s tough when he needs to be and he’s quick enough to get into the backfield from time to time. There’s a problem with his conditioning and he’ll break down from time to time unless he ramps up his workouts a few levels. The potential is there to be a long-time contributor, but he has to want it and he has to be cool with getting kicked around a bit by the coaches.
CFN Projection: Fourth Round

105. Dorin Dickerson, TE Pitt 6-1, 226
While he’s way too small and he’ll never block anyone at the next level, the 4.4 speed at the Combine and the 43.5” vertical overcomes a ton of problems. A field-stretching H-Back who can be used in a variety of ways as a receiver, he can make deep plays, work in the slot, or line up as a tight end from time to time. However, he doesn’t use his speed well enough on the field and he doesn’t block anyone. Someone will fall in love with his athleticism and his potential, but he could turn out to be flashier than consistently good. He needs the right fit.
CFN Projection: Third Round

106. Torrell Troup, DT UCF 6-3, 314
Very big and very strong, he’s a physical interior presence who can be plugged in on the nose and hold his own. Double teams aren’t a problem for him and he’s always working and he always has the motor going full tilt. However, he’s not going anywhere. There’s no mobility and he’ll never get into the backfield. There’s a limit on where he can play and what he can do, but he should hang around the league for a long time as a nice piece of a puzzle.
CFN Projection: Third Round

107. Lindsey Witten, DE Connecticut 6-4, 250 (OLB)
A true tweener, he’s a good athlete with a high motor, but he’s a linebacker who plays on the end. The problem is his lack of size for the line and his average quickness and athleticism as a linebacker. A great pass rusher who worked to make himself better, he’s strong for his size and he has the room to get bigger. Explosive off the line, he should be able to get up to around 265 pounds and not lose a thing. However, there’s little upside, he’ll be beaten up by bigger NFL linemen, and he’ll need to be a situational pass rusher early on and likely won’t be able to hold up on first downs.
CFN Projection: Fourth Round

108. Akwasi Owusu-Ansah, DE Indiana (PA) 6-0, 207
The basics are there with great size, blazing speed, and the look of an NFL corner. He can explode out of his cuts and he’s a playmaker who does a little of everything well with good tackling skills and shut-down ability. He had no problems at the D-II level and has to prove he can play among the big boys while needing a ton of coaching to break down his technique to build it back up again. On the plus side, there’s a high ceiling on what could be one of the top X factors among the defensive backs.
CFN Projection: Fourth Round

109. Earl Mitchell, DT Arizona 6-2, 296
An okay prospect after the season ended, his stock shot up after some terrific workouts including a shocking Combine tearing off a 4.7 40 and he moved well in the short drills. He’s still a work in progress, he isn’t huge, and he’ll likely be limited to being a two-gap tackle, but his athleticism is intriguing and his quickness, character, and work ethic are enough to earn him a spot in someone’s rotation.
CFN Projection: Fourth Round

110. Jimmy Graham, TE Miami 6-6, 260
Potential, potential, potential. While he’s a raw prospect who needs time and a whole bunch of coaching, the upside is there to potentially be the best tight end in the draft. He’s huge, 4.53 fast, and he can jump out of the stadium. The former basketball player is trying to make the adjustment and has come along extremely fast. He needs a ton of work on his route-running ability, isn’t much of a blocker, and he needs a boatload of technique work, but he’ll bust his tail to try to get better. He’ll require patience, but there should be a tremendous payoff in a few years.
CFN Projection: Third Round

111. Darian Stewart, SS South Carolina 5-11, 213
He times fast he plays fast and he makes plays fast. He has a good burst into the backfield and is a good, productive tackler, but he managed to be underappreciated despite playing in the SEC. Smart, he seems to know where to be a step ahead of everyone else, but he has to get stronger and he doesn’t do much of anything when the ball is in the air. While he might not have all the physical tools, he’s a leader who could end up managing a more talented group of defensive backs working around him.
CFN Projection: Fourth Round

112. Micah Johnson, ILB Kentucky 6-1, 258
A productive collegian who showed great leadership along with great strength, he’s a big, tough tackler who ripped off 31 reps at the Combine and showed just enough quickness to get by. The 4.99 40 was rough and he he’s not the smoothest of athletes, but worst of all, on the field, he doesn’t quite play up to his size. There’s no questioning his leadership, and he’s the type of player everyone lots to have, but he’ll have to show something special in camp early on.
CFN Projection: Fifth Round

113. Ed Dickson, TE Oregon 6-3, 245
A natural, talented receiver with fantastic hands and smooth wide receiver-like ability, he’d be a star prospect if he could only run a little bit faster. A 4.8 runner, he doesn’t have the separation speed to blow past too many NFL defenders and he doesn’t block well, but he’s a fighter who’ll go after the ball and could be a very nice, very safe backup who sticks in the league for a long time.
CFN Projection: Third Round

114. Anthony McCoy, TE USC 6-5, 259
Good enough to be the top tight end on a few draft boards, he has big-time receiving talent, comes through big on key downs, and he makes quarterbacks look great. Stronger on the field than in the weight room, he fights for the ball and almost always wins. However, he could be heartbreaking. His Combine numbers were mediocre, especially the 4.77 40 and the 19 reps on the bench, but he doesn’t bring it play-in-and-play-out. It’s all there to be terrific, but he just doesn’t have the concentration and fire to be special.
CFN Projection: Second Round

115. Dennis Pitta, TE BYU 6-5, 245
A naturally pure pass catcher, he helped himself at the Combine and in workouts by running well, clocking in under 4.7, while coming up with 27 reps on the bench. He also showed surprising agility. So what’s the problem? He doesn’t really use his strength as a blocker, doesn’t have enough suddenness to get in and out of his cuts quickly enough to give an NFL defender problems, and there’s little upside for a player who’ll be 25 when he starts his career. He is what he is, and that’s not all that bad.
CFN Projection: Second Round

116. Jarrett Brown, QB West Virginia 6-3, 224
Extremely intriguing, he’s a project worth the time and the development. He has a great combination of mobility and arm strength with the potential to be used as a Wildcat quarterback early on while he learns the ropes. He only played one year after working behind Pat White and he didn’t always shine under pressure even though he had been in the system and was supposed to know what he was doing. With his arm and his upside, he has the basic tools and now he needs the reps. It’s a shame this wasn’t a few years ago as he’d have been great to develop in NFL Europe to see more time under fire. He’s like a baseball player who needs to log in the at bats before he gets comfortable. It’s hard to tell if his tentativeness and shaky decision-making ability is because he hasn’t seen enough action, or if he doesn’t have the ability. Some quarterback coach will fall in love with the potential.
CFN Projection: Third Round

117. Danario Alexander, WR Missouri 6-5, 215
The best receiver in America over the second half of the 2009 season, Alexander showed great playmaking ability and dangerous deep ball skills. Along with his production, he was also a fantastic downfield blocker with the ability to use his size and strength well. Unfortunately, he suffered a knee injury and durability has always been an issue. He could be a steal if someone is willing to give him a year to fully recover, but he’s not there yet and could ruin his career by trying to rush back to try to impress. His technique needs a ton of work and he needs to use his size to his advantage off the line, but he can play … if healthy.
CFN Projection: Fifth Round

118. Mike Johnson, OG Alabama 6-5, 312
While he’s not the best of athletes and he isn’t going to maul anyone, he’s a technician who was the best blocker on a national title O line. He’s smart, doesn’t make mistakes, and is able to bury defenders once he gets his hand on them. He has a shoulder injury that limited him at the Combine, but he’s expected to be fine. There isn’t anything all that special about him, but he’s a high-character worker who’s just versatile enough to play tackle if needed.
CFN Projection: Fourth Round

119. Pat Angerer, ILB Iowa 6-0, 235
Underappreciated, it could be argued that he was the best linebacker in America in 2009. Short and squatty, he doesn’t look the part, but he ran well, came up with a nice 26 reps on the bench, and was fluid enough to not hurt his stock. With great range, a nose for being disruptive, and a big hitting style, he’s a try-hard type who might have a short shelf life considering he’ll always go all out. While he might be a tough guy, he can be run at and is always better when he gets to go after the ball. He won’t be a star, but he could be a tremendous producer on a defense with a star linebacker or two.
CFN Projection: Fourth Round

120. Alterraun Verner, CBUCLA 5-10, 189
Very quick and very, very good at going to get the ball, he’s a hawker who seems to make things happen. While the straight-line speed is mediocre, he’s so quick that it doesn’t matter. While he’s a bit thin, he’s willing to come up and hit and he doesn’t make a ton of mistakes. The athleticism isn’t there to be elite, and he’s not going to be a No. 1 corner, but he should be an excellent nickel back or a serviceable No. 2 corner on a secondary with a shutdown star.
CFN Projection: Fourth Round

121. C.J. Wilson, DE East Carolina 6-3, 290
A big 3-4 end who cranked out an impressive 32 reps on the bench at the Combine. Athletic for his size, he can move well and could be used just about anywhere with some of the most versatile raw skills in the draft. He’ll never be a top pass rusher and he’s not polished, but he’s tough, won’t be out of the lineup without something major happening, and could be an interesting and safe mid-round flier.
CFN Projection: Fourth Round

122. Dominique Franks, CB Oklahoma 5-11, 194
While he has been timed around the 4.4s, the 4.52 at the Combine wasn’t impressive and he struggled through the short drills. However, he has a great all-around mix of skills and talents with good size and quickness, and he has the attitude to play the part. He can be moved around where needed and would be a better nickel or dime defender than a corner. He doesn’t play up to his talent and talks a better game than he plays, but he has just enough raw talent to be used in some way either as a returner or a key defender in the rotation.
CFN Projection: Fourth Round

123. Jon Asamoah, OG Illinois 6-4, 305
While he’s not massive, he has decent size and excellent quickness. He’s perfect for a zone-blocking scheme and can get around and do what he needs to, but he’s not a finesse player. While he was good for the Illini, he wasn’t dominant against linemen with any talent. He can’t be a star on a line, but he can be a cog who fits in with more talented players around him.
CFN Projection: Third Round

124. Taylor Price, WR Ohio 6-0, 204
One of the high risers on the draft boards over the offseason, he didn’t disappoint at the Combine with a terrific 4.43 to go along with fluid cutting ability in the drills. He might not be all that big, but he has the deep speed to be an intriguing prospect if he can sharpen up the subtle nuances of his game. While he worked out well, he didn’t always look the part in game action and he didn’t always make his mediocre quarterbacks look good. If someone is willing to be patient and will want to mold the clay, he could emerge as a terrific No. 2 target.
CFN Projection: Fourth Round

125. Jermaine Cunningham, DE Florida 6-3, 266 (OLB)
His stock has dropped off the map after being considered a possible first rounder not all that long ago. The size is there, the athleticism and talent are undeniable, and he has produced at the highest of collegiate levels, but he’s a tweener who isn’t quite an outside linebacker and is a bit thin to be a regular end in a 3-4. He’s a hard worker and a battler, but he benefitted greatly from having a lot of great players around him.
CFN Projection: Fourth Round

126. Darryl Sharpton, ILB Miami 5-11, 236
Short and very compact, he gets good leverage and is a strong tackler who battles well and fights hard in a limited space. A big hitter, he packs a wallop when he gets to unload. Even though he’s a mediocre athlete with limited range, he’s versatile enough to play in any style and any linebacker spot, but there’s a hard-ceiling on what he can do and how good he’ll be. He got by on talent way too often at Miami, and that’s not going to work at the next level.
CFN Projection: Fourth Round

127. Eric Decker, WR Minnesota 6-3, 217
If it could be guaranteed that he’d stay healthy, he’d be one of the top four receivers taken. Despite being the focus of every secondary, he still found ways to make big plays time and again was great against the better corners. But he can’t stay healthy. His physical and fearless style gets him in trouble as he suffered a concussion, a shoulder injury, and two season ending injuries over the last two years including a torn ligament in his foot that kept him from working out for teams this offseason. A baseball player who could’ve kicked around the minor league system, he’s a ball player who’ll fight to become a good NFL performer. But he might have a short shelf life considering he can’t stay on the field.
CFN Projection: Third Round

128. Sam Young, OT Notre Dame 6-8, 316
If Jimmy Clausen was Charlie Weis’s No. 1 recruit, Young was No. 1A. A huge get for the program, literally, he was good, but wasn’t nearly as good as his hype and promise. Way too stiff, not enough of a killer for the running game, and not quick enough to handle the faster speed rushers, he’ll struggle at left tackle and is too tall to play guard. For all his problems, he wants to be a good player and will work to become better. With his experience and his size he should stick around the league for a while, but there’s a hard ceiling on what he can do.
CFN Projection: Fourth Round

129. Myron Lewis, CB Vanderbilt 6-2, 203
With excellent size and good production, he has the frame to look the part. And then he ran a 4.45 at the Combine and exploded in the broad jump, with a 10’6” leap, and now he’s on everyone’s radar. Not afraid to use his size, he’ll come up with the hits needed, and he’s a fighter with an attitude. However, he’s not the best of run stoppers, he has been banged up, and he was beaten way too often. He’ll likely be overdrafted, but he can be used as a nickel or dime defender if he has to.
CFN Projection: Third Round

130. Freddie Barnes, WR Bowling Green 6-0, 212
He’s too small and too slow, but he plays quicker than his workouts and is far more athletic than his times. After starting out as a jack-of-all-trades, including a dangerous running quarterback, he finished his career setting the NCAA record for most catches in a season making 155 grabs for 1,770 yards and 19 touchdowns. While he doesn’t appear to be anything special, he’s a fantastic route runner and makes play after play after play. He’s a smart player who finds ways to get open and catches everything thrown his way, but his physical limitations put a ceiling on what he can become. He’ll stick on a roster and emerge as a solid No. 3 target.
CFN Projection: Sixth Round

131. Larry Asante, SS Nebraska 6-0, 212
Very tough and very physical, he’s an intimidating force who looks like a strong safety. When he gets to the ball, he doesn’t miss a tackle and he’ll be one of the toughest workers on any team. However, he doesn’t move all that well and isn’t great in pass coverage. It would be nice if he could play like a smallish linebacker and he could shine if he’s in the right scheme and doesn’t have to hang around with the speedier receivers. Put him in a box and he’ll make every play, but his raw skills just aren’t there to be hope for any big upside. He is what he’s going to be, and while that’s not bad, he’ll be limited.
CFN Projection: Fourth Round