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2010 NFL Draft - 5th Round Talents
Auburn LB Antonio Coleman
Auburn LB Antonio Coleman
CollegeFootballNews.com
Posted Apr 20, 2010


From the college football perspective, here's CFN's 2010 pre-draft ranking of the players with fifth round talent.

2010 NFL Draft Position Rankings

Fifth Round Talents


By Pete Fiutak

2010 CFN Talent Rankings
- 1st Rounders
- 2nd Rounders
- 3rd Rounders
- 4th Rounders
- 5th Rounders
- 6th Rounders
- 7th Rounders 
- Top Free Agent Talents 

2010 CFN Position Rankings & Analysis

- QBs | RBs | WRs | TEs
- Cs | OTs | OGs | DEs
- DTs | ILBs | OLBs
- Ss | CBs

2010 NFL Combine Quick Looks & Post-Combine Rankings

- QBs | RBs | WRs | TEs
- Cs | OTs | OGs | DEs
- DTs | ILBs | OLBs
- Ss | CBs

2010 NFL Combine Results
- QBs | RBs | WRs | TEs
- Cs | OTs | OGs | DEs
- DTs | ILBs | OLBs
- Ss | CBs 

2010 NFL Combine
- Offensive Winners  
- Offensive Losers 
- Defensive Winners 
- Defensive Losers

132. Tony Washington, OT Abilene Christian 6-6, 311
Two issues. 1) He didn’t play against a high level of competition, because 2) he wasn’t able to go to LSU because of his grades and after being convicted of having sex with a relative. On the field, he was fantastic at the lower level and showed tremendous 5.19 speed and came up with 33 reps at the Combine. He moves well, works extremely hard, and with the past behind him, should grow into a nice player with a little more time. He needs technique work and he has to get used to playing against defenders at his own level. Outside of Bruce Campbell, he’s one of the draft’s biggest boom or bust picks.
CFN Projection: Fourth Round

133. Thaddeus Gibson, OLB Ohio State 6-2, 243
With a great frame and the perfect look, he has the appearance of a next-level linebacker, even though he has defensive end skills. A veteran who has been through it all, he has great athleticism and could be a natural in several spot. Very quick, he led all defensive ends at the Combine in the cone drill and blazed through the shuttle drills, and the 32 reps on the bench were terrific. However, his skills don’t necessarily translate to the field and he isn’t an elite pass rusher and there might be a concern of a Vernon Gholston tag (looks the part but can’t play).
CFN Projection: Second Round

134. Dexter Davis, OLB Arizona State 6-1, 244 (DE)
One of the quickest and most fluid ends at the Combine, he ran a fast 4.64 40 with a decent 24 reps on the bench. However, while he might be tried out as a situational pass rusher on the outside, he’ll be an outside linebacker. There’s the potential for a problem against NFL blockers, even though he held up well against top college linemen. He stays blocked for too long and will have to use his quickness better in space.
CFN Projection: Fourth Round

135. Jared Veldheer, OT Hillsdale 6-8, 312
Very, very, big and very, very long, he’s still trying to fill out his frame after working to get to over 300 pounds. A terrific pass blocker at the lower level he erased all the mediocre talent he faced and showed the 5.09 speed and athleticism that most of the big-school tackle prospects would’ve dreamed of coming up with. He’s not used to beating up defenders and will have to get used to playing mean enough to get the attitude to match his athleticism. While he’s not polished, he has limitless upside.
CFN Projection: Third Round

136. Emmanuel Sanders, WR SMU 5-11, 186
With 4.44 speed and excellent jumping ability, he’s a terrific athlete who negates his lack of size by being able to jump out of the stadium. He’ll work for a catch and is never afraid to try to make the tough play, and while his deep speed is excellent, his quickness and cutting ability is even better. There are character issues, though, having been suspended from the team after having problems missing meetings and not being on time enough. He’s not big, but he has the quickness to be a dangerous slot receiver and a great third target in a Wes Welker-like mold.
CFN Projection: Third Round

137. Antonio Coleman, OLB Auburn 6-1, 255 (DE)
While he’s being projected as more of a defensive end, he’ll make his money as a pass rusher as a 3-4 outside linebacker. He needs to get functionally stronger, but he’s a hard worker, he always has his foot on the gas, and he holds up well playing bigger than his size. He’s not strong enough and big enough to be an NFL end, and he’s not quite a good enough athlete to be an elite linebacker. While he’ll be a good pro, he’s not going to be a great one.
CFN Projection: Fifth Round

138. Mike McLaughlin, ILB Boston College 6-0, 242
While he’s extremely strong, he’s also slow. Built to be in the middle with good leverage and decent side-to-side mobility, he’s a leader who holds up against the run and has a good nose to sniff out plays. Always good at beating up ball carriers, he does a good job of intimidating on the inside. He’s not going to be an NFL superstar, but he could be a long time pro with his work ethic and his toughness. He’ll find a place on someone’s defense.
CFN Projection: Fifth Round

139. Adam Ulatoski, OT Texas 6-5, 300
While he did a good job of being a key cog on a national title-level offense, he doesn’t have the bulk or the skills to translate to the next level. He’s not big enough or strong enough to be a power-run blocker, and he’s not quick enough to match up with a zone-blocking scheme. Basically, there isn’t a spot for him, but he was a good football player at a high level and could hang around the league for a long time as a solid backup.
CFN Projection: Fifth Round

140. Corey Peters, DT Kentucky 6-3, 300
A solid, underappreciated prospect with good lateral movement and excellent quickness, he’s not going to be an anchor and he needs to be far more creative with his moves. A very productive playmaker at a high level, he’s smart, experienced, and has better intangibles than talent. There’s a limit on what he can do and he doesn’t have NFL skills at any level, but he’ll be a hard-worker who could grow into a nice backup who sticks around for a long time.
CFN Projection: Fifth Round

141. Andre Roberts, WR Citadel 5-11, 195
With excellent 4.46 speed and great route running ability, he has the raw tools and the toughness to do a little bit of anything. He can work inside or out and he get deep. With the skills along with the work ethic, he has the potential to be a long time pro. While he has good wheels, he doesn’t have elite speed and his size could be a problem against more physical corners. He bulked up a bit over the year and doesn’t have any room to get stronger.
CFN Projection: Third Round

142. Koa Misi, OLB Utah 6-3, 251 (DE)
He’ll be good in a variety of ways and might end up being a defensive end if he can bulk up a little bit; he has the room on his frame to do it. With the strength to be on the line and just enough speed and quickness to be a linebacker, his versatility alone will boost him up many draft charts. However, he’s not an NFL defensive end lacking the pass rushing ability to be used as a Rush End. He’ll work his tail off to become a solid pro and he should grow into the job on the outside, but it’ll probably take a little while.
CFN Projection: Third Round

143. Jeff Owens, DT Georgia 6-1, 304
Not big, not all that beefy, and he doesn’t look the part, but he’s insanely strong, coming up with 44 reps on the bench at the Combine, and he moves well. The raw skills are there to be bull of a run stopper in a rotation, and he’ll always give a full day’s work with a non-stop motor. However, he’s a better prospect than a football player, has had problems getting past a knee injury suffered a few years ago, and there’s no athleticism.
CFN Projection: Fourth Round

144. Clifton Geathers, DE South Carolina 6-7, 299 (DT)
An phenomenal physical specimen, he’s huge, long, athletic, and strong enough to be moved to tackle at times if needed. A prototype 3-4 end measurable-wise, he looks the part and has unlimited potential. However, he was a mediocre, disappointing college player who plays too high and gets knocked around way too easily. Not a tough tackler, he’ll struggle to wrap up a bit too much and he’s an unrefined pass rusher. If someone wants to go through the work of trying to mold the wad of clay, there could something special down the road.
CFN Projection: Fourth Round

145. George Selvie, DE South Florida 6-3, 252 (OLB)
After dominating at a high level, he had a disappointing final season and was overshadowed by freakish lineman Jason Pierre-Paul. While his stock has dropped as no one can quite figure out what he is, he’s a good football player with the potential to be a much better pro than a collegian. He’s not quite big enough to be a regular defensive lineman, and he’s not necessarily an outside linebacker, he’s fluid, strong, and is a fantastic pass rusher who plays better than he times. While he’ll play tough, he just won’t have the bulk to not get buried at times.
CFN Projection: Fourth Round

146. Riley Cooper, WR Florida 6-3, 222
Very big and very athletic, he’s the size of a smallish tight end with the talent to be a top baseball prospect as well. He’s not going to be the quickest target, but he has decent 4.52 speed for a player of his size. Speed isn’t his game, though. He’s a big, tough target with big hands and good strength, and he’ll be the type of receiver who does a little of everything well from blocking to being a third down target to making things happen in the red zone.
CFN Projection: Third Round

147. Mike Williams, WR Syracuse 6-2, 221 (Jr.)
There’s no questioning his talent, his size, or his potential. He’s not a blazer, running a 4.53, but he’s fast on the field when tracking the ball and he’s good at getting open. He looks the part, and if there weren’t off-the-field issues he’d likely be one of the top five receiver prospects. But there are the knucklehead concerns after getting suspended in each of the last two seasons. Not all that strong, benching 225 pounds just eight times at the Combine, he needs to be far stronger for his size and he has to show he wants to be great. He has to work and he has to prove he’s not a pinhead (which he wasn’t able to do in interviews).
CFN Projection: Fourth Round

148. Levi Brown, QB Troy 6-4, 229
It took a little while, and a transfer from Richmond, but Brown turned into a whale of a playmaker for a great Sun Belt team. Once the light went on, he was a cool, steady bomber who made all the throws and showed a great command of the offense. A baller, he’s the type of player who’s going to work his tail off to become a good player and has the intensity and focus lacking among many prospects in this draft. He’ll need mechanical work, and lots of it, needing to come up with a more compact throwing motion, and he has to get used to working up under center, but he has the makeup to be a solid starter if given the chance to work through his mistakes.
CFN Projection: Fourth Round

149. Chris Brown, RB Oklahoma 5-10, 210
Always productive when he get his chance and he did a good job of filling in well as a part of a team loaded with talent. He’s not special in any way, he’s not all that fast, not all that physical, and he’s not going to be much of a blocker or a receiver. He’s a runner, and while a ground game can’t be revolved around him, he’s the type of player who can fill in as a stopgap for two or three games when the star gets banged up. He’ll flourish with a few chances here and there but will never set the world on fire.
CFN Projection: Sixth Round

150. Stephen Williams, WR Toledo 6-5, 210,
The pieces are all there to be fantastic. He’s huge, ran a 4.53 at the Combine, and was quick in the workouts for a player of his size. With his jumping ability and his height, throw it up in the air and he’ll go and get it, and he adjusts to the ball like a much smaller player. However, he’s not a polished route runner and he has to hit the weights to fill out his frame. There’s also a question of it he wants it. He has to be a more fiery competitor against the tougher defensive backs.
CFN Projection: Fourth Round

151. Tony Moeaki, TE Iowa 6-3, 245
The big concern is his durability, but other than that he has the potential to be a solid No. 2 tight end. A good receiver, he showed good quickness at the Combine and caught everything thrown his way. While he’s not huge and he’s not a top blocker, he’s big enough to give a few matchup problems. You name the body part and he has probably had some issue with it.
CFN Projection: Fourth Round

152. Kam Chancellor, SS Virginia Tech 6-3, 231
Part linebacker, part safety, he’s a huge defensive back with great range for his size. He’ll be great when he moves close to the line and will be terrific in run support. He’s as reliable as they come and is the type of player coaches love to have and had the great Combine needed to confirm what many will see on film. However, he’s a bit of tweener who might not fit a defined role at the next level and may have to beef up to be a smallish linebacker. He’ll get drafted relatively well because he’s a good football player, but someone will have to have a specific idea for how to use him.
CFN Projection: Fourth Round

153. Jason Fox, OT Miami 6-7, 303
A great athlete with the frame to get far bigger, he’s a high-character former tight end who moves well, is great on the move, and can play several spots on the line even though he’s not all that bulky. He needs to hit the weight room and he’s not going to flatten anyone, but he could be great in the right finesse scheme and he could be scratching the surface on his potential. It’s going to take a little while, but he has great upside for a few years down the road.
CFN Projection: Fourth Round

154. Matt Tennant, C Boston College 6-5, 300
A good leader who doesn’t make mistakes and has great technique, he’s just good enough to step in and be a good backup from the start. He had a great offseason showing off excellent agility and the upside to be someone’s center for a long time. He needs to get stronger, but he’ll always give an honest effort and he’ll never get out of the lineup once he’s in. He could turn out to be a great value pick.
CFN Projection: Fourth Round

155. Sergio Render, OG Virginia Tech 6-3, 318
Extremely strong and a terrific run blocker, he’s a mauler with little finesse about his play. He’s not going to do anything on the move and he’s such a weightlifting fiend that he has various pulls and other issues, but he plays through the problems, is as reliable and durable as they come, and can be plugged in from Day One. However, he’s not known for being the hardest worker on the field.
CFN Projection: Fifth Round

156. Mike Neal, DT Purdue 6-3, 294
While he’s not all that big and he’s a one-gap only tackle who’ll only be useful if he gets into the backfield, he’s just quick enough and just strong enough to make a roster and be a key backup. Tremendous at times in off-season workouts, he looks the part with a great body and excellent weight room strength. Better in practices than on the field, he’s limited in what he can do and has to be in the right scheme to succeed.
CFN Projection: Fourth Round

157. Ted Larsen, C NC State 6-2, 304
Originally a defensive tackle, he’s an intense blocker who’s great on the move. While he’s not going to run over anyone, he’s a nasty blocker who always goes full-tilt and is always looking for someone to his. A bit too inconsistent in offseason practices, he might get tried out at guard even though that’s not his position. He’s still a work in progress, but he’ll do what’s needed to make himself better. However, he might be ready to go right now if he’s in a zone-blocking scheme that can take advantage of his mobility.
CFN Projection: Fourth Round

158. Linval Joseph, DT East Carolina 6-4, 328
A very big stick in the mud, he can be put in the middle of the line and everyone can work around him. He’s massive with long arms and phenomenal strength coming up with 39 reps at the Combine. While he has good tools, he’s really, really raw and will need time to develop into his size and strength. More of a prospect than a sure thing, he’ll be taken by someone who’ll see a big wad of clay that could be molded into a superstar. The upside is limitless and he could be a top nose tackle who allows everyone else to shine.
CFN Projection: Second Round

159. Mitch Petrus, OG Arkansas 6-3, 310
Freakishly strong, he came up with a whopping, too-good-to-be-true, 45 reps of 225 pounds on the bench at the Combine. The former tight end and fullback also moved relatively well considering the show he put on in the weight room. However, his strength isn’t functional, he’s not a dominant run blocker, and he needs a ton of technique work. With the right coaching he could be decent in the right offense.
CFN Projection: Fourth Round

160. Javier Arenas, CB/PR Alabama 5-9, 197
Strong with a fantastic burst and sudden quickness, he’s a good prospect with the skills to potentially be a decent NFL corner. However, he’ll make it on his return ability. He’s an aggressive defender who isn’t afraid to mix it up, he’s a pure football player who does everything naturally. Technique-wise, he has a problem and isn’t a No. 1 NFL corner. He could be put on the outside from time to time, but not on a regular basis. His money will be made as a returner and as a nickel defender who’ll grow into a big hitter.
CFN Projection: Third Round

161. Walter Thurmond, CB Oregon 5-11, 189
With long size and nice athleticism, he’s a strong prospect who makes things happen and is a willing run defender. A fantastic football player, he has taken his lumps and worked through them to get the experience needed to be ready right away, even if he’ll have problem against the stronger receivers. So what’s the problem? His knee. He suffered a bad injury and needs to prove now that he can hold up on a regular basis. If his knee turns out to be fine, he’ll be one of the better corners in the draft. But that’s a big if.
CFN Projection: Fourth Round

162. Mike Kafka, QB Northwestern 6-3, 225
An interesting prospect with enough game to be a long-time backup with starting potential in a few years. He only started for one season at Northwestern and was considered more of a runner than a thrower until last year, and then he bombed away with no ground game to help him out. He needs reps and he needs more live action as his immaturity on the field showed with way too many bad reads and way too many bad throws. However, he’s smart, will work his tail off, and won’t have any problem with any playbook. He’s not going to throw a grape through a brick wall, but he has enough of an arm to push the ball down the field, and the mobility to make things happen on the move. After looking great in offseason workouts and practices, he’s worth developing.
CFN Projection: Fourth Round

163. Lonyae Miller, RB Fresno State 5-11, 221
He could be the most intriguing sleeper call over the second half of the draft. With 4.5 speed, excellent size, and tremendous raw skills, he looks the part and could turn out to be ready to explode. A career backup behind some terrific Fresno State runners, he hasn’t seen all that much work and should have a long shelf life. He’s not the most natural of runners and doesn’t run up to his size, but anyone taking him will be going by the possibilities. After looking strong this offseason in workouts, someone will fall in love with the possibilities.
CFN Projection: Fifth Round

164. Nate Byham, TE Pitt 6-4, 268
In a draft full of receivers, Byham is the best of the blockers. He’s big, extremely slow, and a bit lumbering, but he sucks in every pass that comes his way and he’s too strong and tough for most defensive backs. His money will be made by hitting people in two-tight end sets, but he could find a role as a nice short-range, goal line target.
CFN Projection: Fourth Round

165. David Reed, WR Utah 6-0, 191
A JUCO superstar, he came to Utah and put together a nice career. While he isn’t all that fast, running a 4.56, for a player of his size, he looks faster on the field and fights for the ball when it comes his way. He adjusts well and he’s a quick cutter on his routes. However, he needs to get stronger and doesn’t have the top raw skills to be anything more than a complementary player, even though he quickly became the main man for the Utah passing game.
CFN Projection: Fifth Round

166. Jordan Shipley, WR Texas 5-11, 193
A better playmaker than a prospect, he’s not big, he’s only 4.62 fast, and he’s not all that athletic. However, he’s quick, runs great routes, is a great returner, and he always rose to the occasion. He was tremendous on short-to-midrange routes and knows how to get separation in short spaces. While there’s a limit on what he can do and he’ll never get past any NFL corner, he could be superior in the Wes Welker-like role on a team like the Patriots.
CFN Projection: Fourth Round

167. Crezdon Butler, CB Clemson 6-0, 191
The size is there and the speed is definitely there after blazing a 4.41 at the Combine to go with a stunning vertical of 39.5”. His technique needs to be blown up to be built up again by an NFL coaching staff. The athleticism isn’t a problem and he looks the part, but he’s not a natural football player and he doesn’t tackle up to his size. Some defensive coach will have to see Butler as a wad of clay to mold and will have to ignore the game tape.
CFN Projection: Fourth Round

168. Charles Scott, RB LSU 5-11, 238
He had a strange career and should’ve been able to do a lot more behind a line that underachieved, but had size. A thick, strong runner without a lot of speed, he’s a pure inside back who can move the pile and make things happen by always going forward. While he doesn’t time fast, he gets through a hole in a hurry and beats up tacklers. He’ll take some huge hits, isn’t a receiver, and has little creativity or wiggle, but he could find a role as a goal line/short yardage back.
CFN Projection: Fifth Round

169. Willie Young, DE NC State 6-5, 251 (OLB)
Very tall with the frame to get bigger, he could be a far more interesting pro than a collegian if he’s able to fill out his frame. He can play in any scheme with good enough athleticism to work as an outside linebacker and just enough strength to be a decent end, but he doesn’t have an elite skill set and there’s a hard ceiling on what he can do. Old, he’ll be 25 at the start of the season and will have to bulk up in a hurry to maximize his potential. A pure pass rusher, he’ll have to add more to his game to be a three-down defender and to be involved against power running teams.
CFN Projection: Fourth Round