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2010 NFL Draft - 6th Round Talents
Baylor LB Joe Pawelek
Baylor LB Joe Pawelek
CollegeFootballNews.com
Posted Apr 20, 2010


From the college football perspective, here's CFN's 2010 pre-draft ranking of the players with sixth round talent.

2010 NFL Draft Position Rankings

Sixth Round Talents


By Pete Fiutak

2010 CFN Talent Rankings
- 1st Rounders
- 2nd Rounders
- 3rd Rounders
- 4th Rounders
- 5th Rounders
- 6th Rounders
- 7th Rounders 
- Top Free Agent Talents 

2010 CFN Position Rankings & Analysis

- QBs | RBs | WRs | TEs
- Cs | OTs | OGs | DEs
- DTs | ILBs | OLBs
- Ss | CBs

2010 NFL Combine Quick Looks & Post-Combine Rankings

- QBs | RBs | WRs | TEs
- Cs | OTs | OGs | DEs
- DTs | ILBs | OLBs
- Ss | CBs

2010 NFL Combine Results
- QBs | RBs | WRs | TEs
- Cs | OTs | OGs | DEs
- DTs | ILBs | OLBs
- Ss | CBs 

2010 NFL Combine
- Offensive Winners  
- Offensive Losers 
- Defensive Winners 
- Defensive Losers

170. John Skelton, QB Fordham 6-5, 243
Forget about all the spread quarterbacks; here’s a true bomber who can push the ball all around the field. There’s a problem with arm strength in this class, but not with Skelton who has the gun to make all the throws with the raw skills that Sam Bradford, Jimmy Clausen and the other top prospects aren’t close to owning. Playing at Fordham was an issue and he needs time against faster, better competition, and there are some major design flaws that have to be worked on. His mechanics are lazy because of his arm and he has little in the way of mobility. He’s hardly a special prospect, but he has enough of an arm to make NFL quarterback coaches think that something might be there.
CFN Projection: Fourth Round

171. Antonio Brown, WR Central Michigan 5-10, 186 (Jr.)
Ultra-productive as both a receiver and a return man, he was an elite college playmaker, even though he played in the MAC, with good quickness, smooth ability, and clutch play as Dan LeFevour’s most dangerous target. He’s not all that big and the 4.57 40 run at the Combine was a killer, but he plays fast on the field. Not all that polished and without a top-end work ethic, he’s not a sure thing, but when the lights were on he was fantastic.
CFN Projection: Fifth Round

172. Jevan Snead, QB Ole Miss 6-3, 219 (Jr.)
Everything is there except the ability to play quarterback in the NFL … for now. On promise and projection, he has the raw talent to be the most talented quarterback in this draft, but he doesn’t have “it.” The size is there, the arm strength is fantastic, and he’s good on the move, but he was always a second-banana, choosing Texas after Tim Tebow committed to Florida, and bolted to Ole Miss after he couldn’t beat out Colt McCoy. While he looks the part, he makes puzzling decisions under fire and is wildly inconsistent throwing way too many interceptions. He’s the type of quarterback who could bounce around the league for several years as team after team looks at him in workouts and thinks something might be there, but he’s not an ideal backup. He lacks the makeup to come in cold and pull a team out of the fire, and he’s way too wild to be a starter right away. However, if he’s given a few years to develop and can stay with one team and learn one system (he’s book smart, but not football smart), he could have a Derek Anderson-like stunner of a season down the road.
CFN Projection: Fourth Round

173. Shawn Lauvao, OG Arizona State 6-3, 315
Extremely strong, he came up with 33 reps on the bench and he has the athleticism and quickness to match. The only positive on some awful ASU lines, he’s tough, shuffles well, and is terrific at getting to the second level. However, he’s not really a mauler and isn’t really built to be an NFL guard. Even so, if he gets to run and move, he’ll be a starter.
CFN Projection: Fourth Round

174. Marshall Newhouse, OG TCU 6-4 319 (OT)
A true tweener, he’s not quite talented enough to be an NFL tackle and he’s not tough enough to be a dominant guard. He was a fantastic anchor for some great TCU lines and he’s versatile enough to see time doing a variety of things. One of the quickest linemen at the Combine, he moves well, but that’s about it. It’ll be shocking if he’s more than a career backup, but his versatility will come in handy.
CFN Projection: Fifth Round

175. Shawnbrey McNeal, RB SMU 5-9, 194 (Jr.)
After doing the near impossible and putting up big rushing numbers in a June Jones passing offense, he had to leave early to help take care of some family issues. While he was a Texas state champion sprinter, he timed shockingly slow (a 4.53) for a player of his size (or lack of it). He’s faster on the field with a great burst through the hole and the hands to be used in a variety of ways in the passing game. While he’s not going to be an every-down back by any means, he could find a role as a third down back.
CFN Projection: Sixth Round

176. Kurt Coleman, SS Ohio State 5-10, 192
A small, active defender who finds ways to make plays, he’s a good athlete with decent strength and good ability to go out and be a baller. He might not look the part, but he’s a pure football player who seems to always find ways to make things happen. A good enough athlete to fit just about any system, he can find a home for someone. However, he’s not an elite athlete and he’s not going to hit anyone with any sort of an impact. He needs to play in a zone and will get beaten badly when matched up one-on-one with anyone with speed. There’s a hard ceiling on what he can become, but he should be a decent player who bounces around the league for a while.
CFN Projection: Fifth Round

177. Walter McFadden, CB Auburn 5-11, 172
Very quick and stand-out speedy on the field, he’s able to stay with the quicker receivers and is aggressive enough to not get shoved around by the bigger ones. However, he’s not a tough tackler and lets too many plays slip through his arms. If he can hit the weights a bit be surrounded by a few good defensive backs, he’ll be fine. If he has to make things happen on his own, he’ll be in trouble. He’s a better player than his basics, and he could be a lot better as his career goes on.
CFN Projection: Fourth Round

178. Aleric Mullins, DT North Carolina 6-1, 321
An interesting prospect with stunning athleticism on a huge frame. He’s short, squatty, and he’s not all that huge anywhere but around the middle, but he gets off the ball in a heartbeat and has interesting tools worth developing. But does he want to do the work needed? He struggled with his academics and was in a constant battle to get eligible, and he never lived up to his prep potential. If he wants it, he could be a ten-year pro at a high level,
CFN Projection: Fifth Round

179. Marcus Easley, WR Connecticut 6-3, 210
All the measurables are there with tremendous size and 4.42 speed. He might have smallish hands and he might be extremely raw, but the upside is so great that he’s worth a flier. He’ll need a little time, but until he gets a year of pro coaching in him he can be used as a deep threat and a big-play game-changer. However, he’s just not a natural wide receiver and is more prospect than player. A walk-on with a walk-on mentality, he’ll run through a wall to make himself a player and is worth the flier.
CFN Projection: Fourth Round

180. Clay Harbor, TE Missouri State 6-3, 252
A decent prospect going into the offseason, he helped himself immeasurably with a good Combine showing decent 4.69 speed with a tackle-like 30 reps on the bench and a 40” vertical. He looks the part and moves extremely well, and he’s a strong enough blocker to be used on all three downs. While he hasn’t played anyone of note and needs coaching, he played like he belonged in workouts and has fantastic upside. If there is such a thing, he’s a safe flier to take in the middle rounds.
CFN Projection: Fourth Round

181. Myron Rolle, SS Florida State 6-2, 215
With high character, smarts, and the will to want to be a good player, the Rhodes scholar is a special person who’s the type of player everyone wants to have on the team. While he’s not fast, he came up with 21 reps on the bench at the Combine and came up with a great 10’4” broad jump. He’s not great when the ball is in the air and got by on his leadership, smarts, and raw talent at Florida State; he’s not all that instinctive. The big concern for teams will be his desire to go through the work of being an NFL player when he has far more important things ahead of him with dreams of becoming a neurosurgeon.
CFN Projection: Fifth Round

182. Ciron Black, OT LSU 6-5, 327 (OG)
Few prospects fell further, faster. There was a time when he was considered a possible top 15 pick, but he didn’t improve, struggled with his weight, and turned out to be really, really slow and lumbering. While he spent his career at tackle, he doesn’t have the athleticism to stay on the outside and will almost certainly have to spend his career at guard. He’s experienced, huge, and has good character, but he doesn’t have the raw skills to be anything more than a flier if he can’t get in better shape and get a bit quicker.
CFN Projection: Fifth Round

183. Major Wright. SS Florida 5-11, 206
A big-time recruit even among Florida’s high standards, he was a tough all-around defender who played at a high level for his entire career. While he’s not all that big, he’s a great hitter who doesn’t have any problems throwing his body around. The 4.48 he tore off at the Combine showed off his range, but he’s not smooth and he’s not a phenomenal athlete for his size. With his style, he might have a short shelf life and might always get banged up, and it would be a big help if he didn’t always go for the kill shot and was able to simply make the routine stop. Some will see him as a possible Bob Sanders type and will overdraft him, but that’s a huge reach for a good but limited player.
CFN Projection: Fourth Round

184. Jeremy Williams, WR Tulane 6-0, 206
A solid, pure receiver who looks the part with the bulk and the strength to be on an NFL field, but he’s 4.61 slow and doesn’t have a lot of suddenness in his cutting ability and he’s not going to do much of anything after the catch. Knee problems will keep him from ever being a star, and he’s not known for being the type of player who’ll run through a wall to make himself special.
CFN Projection: Fourth Round

185. Kion Wilson, ILB South Florida 6-0, 239
Athletic, he moves around like a defensive back and was a standout on an athletic defense. A great playmaker who’s as tough as they come with an A effort every time out, he’s simply a good football player. However, he’s slowwwww. The 4.89 at the Combine hurt, he’s not slippery when blocked, and he’s too limited physically to be anything other than an inside linebacker. While he might not be drafted early, he’ll be tough to kick out of a training camp.
CFN Projection: Sixth Round

186. Hall Davis, DE Louisiana-Lafayette 6-4, 271
Not really a speed rusher, he’s a great athlete with the work ethic to camp out in a weight room and make himself far stronger. He’s a bit too light to be a 3-4 end and even with his athleticism he’s not quick enough to be a dominant outside linebacker. He’s already maxed out on his size bulking up to get to his current weight, and with his raw skills he can be a versatile defender who’ll get used in a variety of ways. His production in Sun Belt play didn’t match his talent, and he’ll have to show he can become a football player and not just a top prospect.
CFN Projection: Fourth Round

187. Donovan Warren, CB Michigan 5-11, 193
It seemed like a good idea at the time. After coming out early, Warren appeared to be a possible top corner off the board. And then he ran. Slower in workouts than on the field, he came up with a slow 4.65 in the 40 and didn’t look the part at the Combine of a top-shelf corner. Big and with tremendous upside, he could be a sleeper who shines with a little bit of time and a lot of tweaking. Physical, he likes to push around receivers, and he’ll need to in order to make up for his lack of top-end speed. His stock is dropping, but he’ll be a good mid-to-late round pick if someone can find a role for him. He’s not a No. 1 corner in any way.
CFN Projection: Fifth Round

188. Kendrick Lewis, S Ole Miss 6-0, 198
An underappreciated leader who produced at a high level for a decent Ole Miss defense. Fast on the field, he moves well and was good at making the key plays. However, he wasn’t fast in workouts coming up with a disastrous 4.72 at the Combine while laboring through the short drills. The mediocre athleticism and the corner body type limits his potential, and he’s not a physical enough hitter to be intimidating in any way. He’ll work to try to make a roster, but he’ll have to show something big early in a camp to find a spot.
CFN Projection: Sixth Round

189. Zane Beadles, OT Utah 6-4, 310 (OG)
Very experienced and very productive, he was a great blocker for a fantastic Utah offensive line. He was a great leader and he’s always working with a great motor. However, he’s not quick, needs to get a bit bigger, and doesn’t quite have the power to dominate any end with size. He’ll likely make his money at guard and could stay in the league for a while because of his intangibles and versatility, but he needs more talented players around him.
CFN Projection: Fourth Round

190. Brandon Lang, DE Troy 6-4, 266 (OLB)
Fluid, he moves extremely well and blasts off the ball. He might not be all that fast, running a disastrous 4.96 40 at the Combine, and his 20 reps on the bench weren’t nearly good enough to overcome the concerns about his lack of bulk. While he’s a better player than a workout warrior, the raw skills just aren’t there to think he can be anything more than a decent backup unless he gets a lot bigger and a lot stronger.
CFN Projection: Fifth Round

191. Joe Pawelek, ILB Baylor 6-2, 237
Not an athlete in any way, he’s nothing but a pure football player who makes a ton of tackles and was a big-time producer at a high level. He has good size and decent straight-line speed, but he’s not laterally quick and makes plays on instinct and angles as much as talent. Forget about pass coverage or pass rushing potential, and there’s a hard ceiling on what he can do at the next level, but he can be plugged into any lineup and he’ll fill the stat sheet.
CFN Projection: Sixth Round

192. Terrell Skinner, Maryland 6-2, 214 (SS)
While not the typical Maryland workout warrior, he’s big with excellent strength and just enough speed to get by. He’s not fast by any stretch, but he’s just quick enough to not be a total liability in coverage. A big-time hitter, he’s an intimidating force who packs a wallop. He’s not an instinctive player and he makes far, far too many mistakes, but he might be worth a flier just on his size and hitting ability. Someone will see something big in his potential.
CFN Projection: Fifth Round

193. Sean Canfield, CBOregon State 6-4, 223
One of the few true pro-style passers in the draft, he doesn’t need to learn about being under center and he doesn’t need a ton of work on his mechanics. He has the size and he has the teaching playing under Mike Riley, but he’s limited. Everything has to be perfect for him to succeed, and he’s not going to do anything to make a team better just because he’s the quarterback. He lacks the big-time NFL arm needed to make all the throws, and considering he doesn’t have much in the way of mobility, the only way he’ll succeed is in a quick-hitting offense with a great line in front of him. He’ll be someone’s backup for a long stretch, but he’s not starting material.
CFN Projection: Fifth Round

194. Chris Scott, OT Tennessee 6-5, 319
A mauler of a run blocker who’ll likely end up spending his career at guard, he’s very strong, a nice pass blocker, and was, arguably, the best blocker on a terrific Volunteer line. Able to play almost anywhere on the line, his versatility alone should keep him on a roster as a backup, at least. He needs to get physically stronger (he’s not going to be able to overpower linemen in the NFL like he did in college) to be a great guard, and he needs technique work, but he could be a low-risk pick late.
CFN Projection: Sixth Round

195. Shelley Smith, OG Colorado State 6-3, 300
Size matters. If 6-3 and 300 pounds can be considered small, then that’s Smith, who’s one of the most athletic guards in the draft. He came up with an amazing 9’4” broad jump at the Combine and a 34” vertical. He’s strong on the field and holds up extremely well against the big, strong linemen. While he won’t blow anyone off the ball, he can work well in a scheme where he can get on the move.
CFN Projection: Sixth Round

196. Keaton Kristick, OLB Oregon State 6-3, 234
A pure football player. With decent athleticism and a great motor, he could become a special teams superstar if he’s not a top linebacker. He needs to get stronger after coming up with just 16 reps on the bench at the Combine, and he’s a bit too skinny and isn’t a top tackler, but his quickness opened some eyes and he could be used as a situational pass rusher.
CFN Projection: Seventh Round

197. Kyle Jolly, OT North Carolina 6-6, 311
While not that strong on the bench at the Combine with just 20 reps, he was quick, showed good athleticism, and looked good enough to match his solid college production. He’s a high-character player with good technique and the fire to be great, but he’s not nearly physical enough. Forget about him powering over anyone, but he’ll be fine if he doesn’t have to move too much and could blossom if he all of a sudden gets a lot stronger. While he won’t be a star, he should be a terrific, versatile backup.
CFN Projection: Fifth Round

198. Michael Hoomanawanui, TE Illinois 6-4, 264
A tweener who doesn’t do anything at a particularly high level on a consistent basis. He should be a matchup problem as a receiver, but he’s not fast enough (running around a 4.85 40), and he should be a good blocker with his size, but he doesn’t finish his blocks. Just good enough to get a long look as a full-time, three-down tight end, but he doesn’t have special skills and he hasn’t stayed healthy.
CFN Projection: Fifth Round

199. Brandon Carter, OG Texas Tech 6-5, 329
With an interesting mix of raw talents, Carter has the size and the strength to be used at either guard spot. He’s a big hitter who could be a better pro then a collegian after not having to slug anyone in the mouth at Texas Tech. He’s not an athlete and he’s not going to be for every offense, but if he gets the right coach, and one who handles him with kid gloves, he could be a good, productive starter.
CFN Projection: Fifth Round

200. Brandon Deadrick, DT Alabama 6-4, 296 (DE)
The question is where he’s going to play. More of a big end than a tackle, he’s really tall and big, really long, and he’s strong on the inside. He’ll have to be a 3-4 end, but he could see time anywhere up front if and when he needs to move around, but there’s a limit on what he can do. He’s not going to flash into the backfield and isn’t going to get to the quarterback, and there are character issues after a variety of off-the-field issues.
CFN Projection: Fourth Round

201. Colin Peek, TE Alabama 6-5, 254
Extremely tough and willing to take big shots, he might not be much of a receiver but he makes the big plays at the right time and he’s more than willing to provide the big block. However, he doesn’t do anything all that well and will get pushed around by the better linemen. He’s good enough to stick on a roster, but he’s not good enough, or durable enough, to be anything more than a part-time player.
CFN Projection: Sixth Round

202. Kade Weston, DT Georgia 6-5, 317
Tall and with good size, he’s an interesting prospect with the right look and the strength to hold his own on an NFL line. While he’s not a space-eater, he can grow into a terrific backup nose tackle and could be strong against the run for a limited time. He’s not an athlete and he didn’t do all that much with his Georgia career. It’ll take the right coach to unleash his potential, and the hope will be that he’s a diamond in the rough.
CFN Projection: Sixth Round

203. Andrew Quarless, DT Penn State 6-4, 254
An intriguing prospect, he has the hands, he moves well, and he’s a strong, tough blocker who can get down the field. The problem is his head. He doesn’t play nearly as well as his measurables and lacks concentration. He had a few off-the-field issues that kept him in hot water at Penn State. On talent and potential, he might be one of the best tight ends in the draft, but he’s too flaky to invest heavily in him.
CFN Projection: Fourth Round

204. Devin Ross, CB Arizona 5-10, 183
An extremely good, underappreciated player who largely went unnoticed even in his own conference, he’s a football player who has just enough athleticism to get by. He needs technique work, ran a slowish 4.56 40, and he looks a bit small, but he makes up for it, at least a little bit, with a 40” vertical. He’ll be better in an NFL camp than he is in a workout, but he’ll likely slip down the draft because of his lack of top skills.
CFN Projection: Fifth Round

205. Harry Coleman, SS LSU 6-1, 211
While he worked out at the Combine as a linebacker, he’s really a safety after checking in at a mere 211 pounds. He’s a rock of an athlete who was physical enough to be a tough run stopping linebacker at a high level. While he didn’t miss many tackles that came his way, he wasn’t quite quick enough to sniff out big plays. When he got in space he flew to the ball, but he’ll have to prove his talents can translate to the secondary. It might take some seasoning, and he needs to get more physical, but he’ll at least be a strong special teamer right away.
CFN Projection: Fifth Round

206. Sherrick McManis, CB Northwestern 5-11, 195
Very smart and very quick, he moves suddenly and decisively getting by on knowing what he’s supposed to do. Strong against the run, he’s not afraid to step up and be physical enough to come up with big stops in the open field. However, he’s just not a good enough athlete and he doesn’t quite look the part. He tries to be physical, but when he gets blocked he stays blocked. While he might not be a perfect prospect, he’s a good football player who can stick on a roster as a key, versatile reserve.
CFN Projection: Fifth Round

207. Javarris James, RB Miami 6-0, 212
A good prospect who had a decent career and a strong combine, running a 4.53 while coming up with 21 reps on the bench, the problem is that he doesn’t have any special running skills. Durability has been an issue and was always nicked and dinged, and he never had to do more than carry the ball a little bit here and there; he was never a workhorse. He’s a good, tough runner who tries hard, blocks well, and won’t dog it in any way, but he has to show a spark in some way to find a regular role.
CFN Projection: Fifth Round