2010 NFL Draft - 7th Round Talents
Utah OLB Stevenson Sylvester
Utah OLB Stevenson Sylvester
CollegeFootballNews.com
Posted Apr 20, 2010


From the college football perspective, here's CFN's 2010 pre-draft ranking of the players with seventh round talent.

2010 NFL Draft Position Rankings

Seventh Round Talents


By Pete Fiutak

2010 CFN Talent Rankings
- 1st Rounders
- 2nd Rounders
- 3rd Rounders
- 4th Rounders
- 5th Rounders
- 6th Rounders
- 7th Rounders 
- Top Free Agent Talents 

2010 CFN Position Rankings & Analysis

- QBs | RBs | WRs | TEs
- Cs | OTs | OGs | DEs
- DTs | ILBs | OLBs
- Ss | CBs

2010 NFL Combine Quick Looks & Post-Combine Rankings

- QBs | RBs | WRs | TEs
- Cs | OTs | OGs | DEs
- DTs | ILBs | OLBs
- Ss | CBs

2010 NFL Combine Results
- QBs | RBs | WRs | TEs
- Cs | OTs | OGs | DEs
- DTs | ILBs | OLBs
- Ss | CBs 

2010 NFL Combine
- Offensive Winners  
- Offensive Losers 
- Defensive Winners 
- Defensive Losers
208. Chris McGaha, WR Arizona State 6-1, 201
With good size and decent speed, he has the look of an NFL target, and it doesn't hurt that he has some of the biggest hands of all the receiver prospects. He makes every catch that comes his way and he was extremely productive and consistent at finding the holes and the open spaces. However, there's a hard ceiling on what he can do and doesn't have any special skills and will get erased by any NFL corner who tries.
CFN Projection: Fifth Round

209. Blair White, WR Michigan State 6-2, 209
Ultra-productive on the field, he worked out extremely well and has become the pet project of several scouts. He ran a great 4.51 at the Combine, was among the quickest players in the short drills, and has always given walk-on like effort every time out. To go along with the raw skills and the size, he inhales everything that comes his way. So what's the problem? The workout ability doesn't necessarily translate to the field and he never gets any separation. He'll be a decent pro, but he won't be a great one.
CFN Projection: Sixth Round

210. Austen Lane, DE Murray State 6-6, 276
A small school dominator who needed a great Combine to generate a buzz, and he didn't come up with one running a pedestrian 4.83 40 and came up with a mere 20 reps on the bench. Quicker on the field than he was in workouts, he has a decent combination of skills to go along with his size, and he's a worker who'll try to get much better. However, he got shoved around too much at the lower level and he needs to be coached up to show he can play in the NFL. Not necessarily a rock against the run, he'll be eliminated by any blocker with strength.
CFN Projection: Seventh Round

211. Erik Cook, C New Mexico 6-6, 318 (OG)
An extremely productive starter for the Lobos for a long time, he can fill in anywhere needed on the line with tackle size and the push of a guard. He might not be a master of any trade, but he could do anything just well enough to be a godsend of a backup. He needs to get stronger and he's way too much of a tweener without the feet to be a tackle for a long period of time, and he needs to hit the weights hard.
CFN Projection: Seventh Round

212. Kevin Basped, DE Nevada 6-4, 258
A superior college pass rusher who gets off the ball in a hurry, he has the motor and he has the want-to to become a specialist. He's not polished in any way, he's a bit too small, and he's not much of an outside linebacker prospect. Good against the mediocre WAC teams, he disappeared against the better tackles and he has a hard ceiling on his NFL potential. With the right coaching he can be a third-down terror who becomes a major sack artist.
CFN Projection: Sixth Round

213. Keiland Williams, RB LSU 5-11, 233
A disappointment, he has all the size, speed, and skill to look the part of a superstar, but he doesn't play like it. Based on the raw tools he's worth more than just a little bit of a look, but he has never shown that he wants to be a great player, doesn't play nearly as tough as he appears, and didn't do enough for the Tigers to get more than a little bit of work. Either the light has to go on from Day One in a camp, or he'll be a quick and easy cut.
CFN Projection: Seventh Round

214. A.J. Jefferson, CB Fresno State 6-0, 193
A pet prospect for a few talent evaluators, Jefferson showed why with one of the best workouts anyone had at the Combine with a 4.43 40, a whopping 44" vertical, and lightning quick time in the short drills. He's not all that strong (the seven reps on the bench proved that), and he needs a lot of time. A LOT of time. He's raw with no instincts whatsoever for the corner position, but he could be an elite kick returner and if he's pushed by the right coaching staff, the upside is limitless.
CFN Projection: Fifth Round

215. Seyi Ajirotutu, WR Fresno State 6-4, 204
He should be better. He has the size and he has the 4.53 speed and he has the look, and even though he runs well in game speed (and even a bit better than his timed speed) and he looks the part, he just wasn't productive enough. However, it takes him a day and a half to get it into gear and isn't quick enough in his cuts. He's a good prospect, but a disposable one. If he makes it, he'll be just a guy.
CFN Projection: Seventh Round

216. Rahim Alem, DE LSU 6-3, 251
A tweener who runs well and has decent balance, he's an all-out defender who's always active plays tough. He worked his way into becoming a good player and doesn't necessarily fit the mold of the typical LSU athlete. A great tackler, he wraps up and doesn't miss a play. While he doesn't have an NFL position and wasn't nearly as big a playmaker as he needed to be in college, he could find a niche as a pass rushing specialist.
CFN Projection: Sixth Round

217. David Gettis, WR Baylor 6-3, 217
All the basics are there with tremendous size, 4.48 speed, and the phenomenal leaping ability to jump out of the stadium. However, he's not a great football player, gets pushed around way too much for his size, and he could be heartbreaking with his on-field production never going to match his raw skills and potential.
CFN Projection: Sixth Round

218. David Pender, CB Purdue 6-0, 180
Very fast and very explosive, he has been timed consistently in the 4.4s and can't be blown past deep. With great breaking ability on the ball, he's terrific when he gets to turn and run on deep plays. While he's not all that physical, he's a try-hard tackler who isn't afraid to make plays, or at least try to. However, he's not a natural coverman and he's not an instinctive player. Speed alone will give him a long look in a camp, but he'll need to make a few big plays in the preseason to stay.
CFN Projection: Fifth Round

219. Daniel Te'o Nesheim, DE Washington 6-3, 263
While he looks like a linebacker and doesn't have the bulk or size to be an end, he's quick, fast, and strong with the look of a speed rusher in the short drills. A great college producer on some bad teams, he had to do everything himself at times and still came through. The problem is his ceiling; he might have hit it already. The character is a plus and he could be turned loose in the right defense that wants to maximize his skills, but he's not for everyone.
CFN Projection: Seventh Round

220. Curtis Steele, RB Memphis 5-11, 194
Productive when he got the chance, he had problems staying healthy and wasn't always given the opportunity to be a major part of the offense for a full season. He's a good fighter who plays bigger than his size and makes things happen when he has the ball in his hands. However, he's not all that fast for being a smallish player, is a one-cut runner who won't show too much power at the NFL level, and he's not going to hit many home runs.
CFN Projection: Sixth Round

221. Stevenson Sylvester, OLB Utah 6-2, 231
While he's not going to be a three-down defender, he could make a ton of money and make a lot of headlines as a pure pass rushing specialist. He played at a high level throughout his college career and ate Alabama's lunch n the 2009 Sugar Bowl. Extremely quick with cut-on-a-dime quickness, he could be a disruptive force as a 3-4 outside linebacker if he's in the right defense. But if he's on the field for more than a few downs, he'll get run over by any NFL lineman.
CFN Projection: Sixth Round

222. O'Brien Schofield, OLB Wisconsin 6-2, 221 (DE)
Tragically, Schofield tore his ACL in an East-West Shrine practice after being unblockable at times and becoming the talk of the early offseason. Way too small to be a regular NFL defensive end, he proved he could make the transition to outside linebacker before the knee injury, but now there's a question if his ACL will be too much to overcome for a player of his size. He can be erased by good, strong linemen and he'll need to pack on the pounds to be able to hold up on the line. Clutch, he always seemed to get into the backfield and to the quarterback just when the team needed it the most. He'd have likely been a top 100 pick before the injury, and he could be a gem later on for anyone patient enough to let him heal.
CFN Projection: Sixth Round

223. Junior Galette, DE Stillman 6-2, 257
A burgeoning star at Temple, he was suspended from the team for a violation of team rules and he bolted. A top athlete who moves extremely well and slips his way past blocks, he could be more than just a pass rusher even though he's not all that big. The knucklehead factor took him from a possible third round selection to a late flier, but he's a versatile talent with just enough talent to warrant a look.
CFN Projection: Fifth Round

224. Phillip Dillard, ILB Nebraska 6-0, 245
A great hitter who packs a wallop, he has good size and excellent straight-line speed running a 4.64 at the Combine. With a great motor and good character, he's the type of player who'll run through a wall to make plays, but he's not always in the right position and he misses too many plays by being overly aggressive. It took a while before the light went on, but he was great in his one year as a high-end playmaker. He could play inside or out, but after a little bit of time he should shine as an inside linebacker … again, after a little bit of time.
CFN Projection: Fourth Round

225. Perry Riley, OLB LSU 6-1, 239
A big hitter who can fly to the ball when he's in the open, he doesn't miss a stop and is great when dealing with a ball-carrier one-on-one. However, he's not going to be special in space at an NFL level lacking the athleticism to be a top outside linebacker. He might move inside to take advantage of his toughness, but he'll have to get a lot bigger. While he'll never do much in pass coverage, he's used to playing on the weakside and can at least be tried out there. However, he'll probably be overdrafted considering he doesn't have elite skills in any one area for a top linebacker.
CFN Projection: Third Round

226. Jimmy Saddler-McQueen, DT Texas A&M-Kingsville 6-3, 299
Because of his combination of quickness and size he's a raw, raw, RAW prospect who might be worth a long look. He's willing to work on being better and he's always going 100 miles per hour, but he needs serious coaching and will be erased by any blocker with any talent. However, if he gets a lot stronger and is allowed time (like a season or two) to work on becoming a real, live football player, he could be a steal late in the draft.
CFN Projection: Sixth Round

227. Vince Oghobaase, DT Duke 6-5, 303
A tremendous recruit for Duke, he was good, but he wasn't as dominant as originally hoped for. The size is there and he could be a space-eater with a little more time in the weight room, but he's not developed enough as a player or in his body and he had several dings throughout his career. There's wear on the tires and he might have a short shelf life. Worse yet, he doesn't do any one thing at a high NFL level.
CFN Projection: Sixth Round

228. Roddrick Muckelroy, OLB Texas 6-2, 246
A pure outside linebacker, he's a good worker, moves well, and he has a high-end motor, but he's not nearly athletic enough to be a regular on the weakside and isn't functionally strong at an NFL level. While he might not have the top skills, he's a great producer who's a better football player than a workout warrior. He's the type of player coaches love to have since he'll bust his tail in practices, but he simply doesn't have the raw NFL necessities to be anything more than just a guy.
CFN Projection: Fourth Round

229. Jared Perry, WR Missouri 6-1, 178
A tall, thin target, he plays fast on the field but only ran a 4.58 at the Combine. He's quick on his cuts and is good at getting into the open with excellent moves after the catch. However, he's not the sharpest or most disciplined of route runners and he's not physical in any way. He could hang around the league for a while, but he's not going to be anything more than a No. 3 target at very best.
CFN Projection: Seventh Round

230. Joe Hawley, C UNLV 6-3, 297
With nearly perfect size for a center, he's built for the spot, has great functional strength, and he doesn't make a lot of mental mistakes. With the want-to and the drive to always get better, he has grown into a weight room warrior and he could quickly become the leader of someone's line. He's not for everyone, though, with average mobility and he'll have to get used to ditching the spread-blocking of UNLV. Moving to guard, in the right offense, won't be a problem.
CFN Projection: Fifth Round

231. Andre Anderson, RB Tulane 5-11, 205
Following in the footsteps of Matt Forte, Anderson had a decent career as the centerpiece of an awful team. With good strength, he's a solid inside runner who isn't afraid to get physical and always gives a great effort. A good receiver, he could be used as a third down back if he can make a little bit of a splash early. However, he wasn't enough of a difference maker, isn't quick enough for a player of his size, and he doesn't have NFL skills to be a regular runner.
CFN Projection: Sixth Round

232. A.J. Edds, OLB Iowa 6-4, 246
Surprisingly quick for a tall, rangy player, he struggled on the bench at the Combine (16 reps) and wasn't fast enough, but he has room to grow into his frame and could be used in a variety of ways. He's not the flashiest player around, but he's tough and makes a ton of plays. He needs to get a lot stronger, he isn't a pass rusher, and he gets by more on want-to than on raw skills. There's a hard ceiling on what he can become, but he could be a functional backup.
CFN Projection: Free Agent

233. Boris Lee, ILB Troy 6-0, 238
Extremely productive at an all-Sun Belt level, he's a fly all over the place, do the dirty work needed playmaker with great quickness to the ball and always attacks, attacks, and attacks some more. While he plays under control, he's extremely aggressive and makes up for his shortcomings, like his lack of footspeed and his height, by playing smart. He's a tweener who's too small to play inside and too slow to be a regular on the outside, but he'll be someone's star on special teams and should make a roster on want-to.
CFN Projection: Free Agent

234. Cole Pemberton, OT Colorado State 6-7, 315
He has a great frame and room to get bigger, and now he has to get into a weight room and not come out until he has added far more bulk and has gotten a lot stronger. The 18 reps on the bench at the Combine were awful, and he was lumbering through the drills. He has excellent size and he's a fighter who'll battle, but he's not quick enough to ever be on the left side and can't handle speed rushers.
CFN Projection: Sixth Round

235. Jay Ross, DT East Carolina 6-3, 313
A big body with the quickness to hope he can be used in a variety of ways, he has the tools. He's strong, can blow through gaps, and is slippery for a player of his bulk. Not always consistent, he's sloppy in his technique and doesn't play up to his skills. For a player who is so strong and so quick, he was pushed around way too much at a Conference USA level.
CFN Projection: Sixth Round

236. Cameron Sheffield, OLB Troy 6-2, 257 (DE)
A disastrous 4.9 40 at the Combine killed his potential as an outside linebacker, but he's too light to be a regular defensive end. However, he's a good pass rusher and is smart enough to make things happen on the move. He'll need time to learn how to play outside linebacker and might need at least a year to figure out what he's doing. The upside is there for a prospect with just enough talent to become a dangerous strongside linebacker.
CFN Projection: Fifth Round

237. Al Woods, DT LSU 6-4, 309
If you didn't see film on him and only went by looks and measurables, he'd be the prototype. It's all there with phenomenal athleticism for a player of his size, rocking the Combine with a tackle-best 37" vertical, and there isn't a lot of wear on the tires. However, there's a reason. He didn't play nearly as well as his skills and, to put it in the most basic terms, he isn't a good football player. He'll be overdrafted because of his million-dollar tools and he'll drive a coaching staff crazy when he's not better than he looks.
CFN Projection: Third Round

238. Lorenzo Washington, DE Alabama 6-4, 291
Very big, he's a 3-4 end who has no hope of ever becoming a regular pass rusher. At his size he could be a 4-3 tackle with the quickness to move well against the run, and he can play anywhere along the line when needed. A smart, tough player who held firm against the line but didn't do much stat-wise, he has to learn how to play up to his size. He plays like a finesse end in the body of a slow tackle.
CFN Projection: Seventh Round

239. Mike Newton, S Buffalo 5-10, 190 (FS)
With decent speed and good college production, he's an interesting prospect who could pop out in a camp if he gets a decent chance. Just fast enough to get by at either safety spot, he moves well on the field and seems to always be in the right place at the right time. While he's not all that big and he needs to get bulkier, he's a strong tackler who doesn't make mistakes. He'll be the type of player who'll run through a brick wall and will be terrific on special teams, but he's not an elite athlete and isn't going to be an NFL ball-hawker.
CFN Projection: Free Agent

240. Sean Allen, C East Carolina 6-3, 306 (OG)
After seeing time early on as a guard, he moved to center and was more than solid. The size is there and he does a little of everything well, moving nicely in pass protection, and he could easily move out to guard without a problem. He's not going to run around anyone and he gets away with way too many holds, but he could find a role as a versatile interior backup.
CFN Projection: Seventh Round

241. Daryll Clark, QB Penn State 6-2, 235
If playing in the NFL was all about intangibles, character, and leadership, Clark would be a top pick. He's built like a linebacker, and is strong like one, with a big arm that can push the ball down the field without a problem. He doesn't have a whole bunch of touch and doesn't have the type of short-to-midrange accuracy to be used as a dinker and dunker at the NFL level. Considering
CFN Projection: DD

242. Kyle Williams, WR Arizona State 5-9, 185
His money will be made as a returner. Too small and too light, he'll have to be a specialist of a receiver if he makes any sort of an impact as a receiver, but he was extremely fast at the Combine, running a 4.42, cuts on a dime, and moves seamlessly in and out of his breaks. However, he was a good college returner but not a great one and is extremely limited in what he can do at an NFL level.
CFN Projection: Sixth Round

243. Greg Middleton, DE Indiana 6-3, 268
With good explosion and a nice burst, he's quick and big. A few years ago he was an elite college pass rusher and was among the nation's top ends leading the country in sacks, but he dropped off the map. He doesn't have a high-revving motor and didn't maintain his production over the course of his career failing to improve or advance his game. There's a chance the light could go on and he could be a decent NFL specialist.
CFN Projection: Free Agent

244. Scott Long, WR Louisville 6-2, 216
While his durability is a concern, he came up with enough nice offseason workouts to get a look. He's big, ran an impressive 4.46, and is tough enough both in the way he plays and trying to fight off injuries to count on him when there are bumps and bruises. However, he has suffered a torn the ACL in both knees and isn't exactly the smoothest receiver around.
CFN Projection: Seventh Round

245. E.J. Wilson, DE North Carolina 6-2, 286
Very thick, but more of a tackle than an end, he doesn't have special skills and doesn't have elite strength to overcome his lack of athleticism. A try-hard type who's reliable and gets a push into the backfield, he won't run around anyone and he's not a closer. There isn't really a spot for what he does if he's not a 4-3 end, but he's just big enough to see time in a camp as a potential run stopper.
CFN Projection: Free Agent

246. Kerry Meier, WR Kansas 6-2, 224
The problem is that he doesn't have a position. A great pass catcher and a strong route runner, the former quarterback is big and tough, but he has no speed whatsoever and he isn't enough of a blocker to be a tight end. He's not an H-Back and he's limited on what he can do, but he's the type of player the coaches want on the roster. He'll do whatever it takes to get by, and his potential as an emergency quarterback could keep him on a team.
CFN Projection: Sixth Round

247. John Estes, C Hawaii 6-2, 295 (OG)
A tremendously productive college player in a pass-happy system, he was one of the WAC's most dominant linemen over the last several years. Very quick off the ball and with a great motor, he's a nasty blocker who could be great in a finesse system. Size is a concern and he's not going to bury anyone, but he could bounce around the league for a while as a try-hard technician.
CFN Projection: Free Agent

248. Andrew Lewis, OG Oklahoma State 6-4, 298, (C)
Way too small to play guar on a regular basis, he'll be tried out at center and could even get a look at tackle. He's fast off the ball and moves well, and he plays big for his tall size. Smart, he'll get the playbook right away and can be used in a variety of ways. However, he's not going to blast anyone off the ball and will have to be in a finesse offense.
CFN Projection: Seventh Round

249. Josh Hull, ILB Penn State 6-3, 237
Really, really, slow, the 4.91 40 at the Combine was a disaster for a player of his size. However, he proved to be far quicker through the short drills and he moved surprisingly well. On the field, it took a little while but he eventually grew into a rock-solid player who didn't miss many tackles and swallowed up everything that came his way. However, he was a walk-on for a reason; he doesn't have the basic skills. He'll bust his tail to make a lineup, but he'll likely be a half-step too slow for most NFL defenses.
CFN Projection: Free Agent

250. Tim Hiller, QB Western Michigan 6-4, 229
You could do a lot worse than getting a guy who'll be a near-perfect backup and potentially a spot starter who can step in and produce whenever needed. One of the smarter players in the draft, Hiller has book smarts and football smarts with great decision-making ability and a solid, accurate arm. However, he doesn't have a big time gun and he can't start for a long stretch without the ability to drive the ball down the field to scare any secondary. His biggest problem is a knee that was destroyed in 2006. There's no mobility whatsoever and he might be one bad hit away from being done. If he's your starter for a long stretch, you're in trouble, but he'll hang around the league because of his intelligence.
CFN Projection: Free Agent

251. Darius Marshall, RB Marshall 5-9, 190 (Jr.)
Productive, he's a quick, slippery runner who did a great job finding the creases to make positive yards out of nothing. Despite his size, he's good at finishing off runs and is tough to bring down. However, he's wispy, won't be able to run over anyone at the next level, and is a knucklehead. He was suspended for a stretch for drug possession.
CFN Projection: Free Agent

252. Toney Baker, RB NC State 5-10, 229
A strong, tough runner who had the upside and the potential to be a great NFL prospect, but he suffered a major knee injury and was never the same. He has good power, busts his tail, and has done everything possible to try to become a great player, but his knee is too much of a problem, he doesn't have NFL quickness, and he looks like he's laboring a bit as a runner. Even so, he's worth a shot just to see if he has something in the tank for a few good years.
CFN Projection: Fifth Round

253. Eric Olsen, OG Notre Dame 6-4, 306 (C)
While he was a standout among the centers at the Combine, at least on the bench with 35 reps, he doesn't have enough athleticism to overcome his lack of pure bulk. He's a tough, nasty blocker who isn't afraid to hit anyone, and he's the type of high-character leader who coaches love to have. However, he just doesn't move well enough. He might be fine in a phone booth, but that's it. If he makes it, it'll be because of his versatility.
CFN Projection: Seventh Round

254. Zac Robinson, QB Oklahoma State 6-3, 214
While there's no upside whatsoever as a pure passer, he's one of the better athletes among the quarterbacks with the ability to make things happen on the move. He has a good enough arm to hit the deep ball and is accurate enough to potentially be solid in a West Coast offense. However, he played behind a tremendous line and didn't have to deal with a steady pass rush. While his arm is fine, he doesn't have enough to push it outside the hash marks. Because of his running ability he might make a roster with some thought of making him a backup safety and a third QB, but he's not a starter.
CFN Projection: Free Agent

255. Kurtis Gregory, OG Missouri 6-4, 305
A high-character, hard working plugger who knows what he's doing. He has the room to grow a little bit and to get a bit stronger, and with the way his motor is always running, he might make it on want-to alone. However, he's not smooth at all and labors when he moves. The lack of athleticism isn't compensated by power; he's not a road grader.
CFN Projection: Sixth Round